57

I’ve got a <div> with padding. I‘ve set it to height: 0, and given it overflow: hidden and box-sizing: border-box.

HTML

<div>Hello!</div>

CSS

div {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    height: 0;
    overflow: hidden;

    padding: 40px;

    background: red;
    color: white;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/FA29u/2/

As I understand, this should make the <div> disappear.

However, it’s still visible (in Chrome 31 and Firefox 25 on my Mac). The height declaration doesn’t appear to be applying to the padding, despite the box-sizing declaration.

Is this expected behaviour? If so, why? The MDN page on box-sizing doesn’t seem to mention this issue.

Nor, as far as I can tell, does the spec — it reads to me like both width and height should include padding when box-sizing: border-box (or indeed padding-box) are set.

  • 2
    Yes, if you want to use this kind of div in real world, you should make extra wrapper DIV inside this and move padding to it. – Hardy Dec 29 '13 at 16:38
39

The exact definition of border-box is:

That is, any padding or border specified on the element is laid out and drawn inside this specified width and height. The content width and height are calculated by subtracting the border and padding widths of the respective sides from the specified ‘width’ and ‘height’ properties.

So you modify the height an width properties but padding and border never change.

As the content width and height cannot be negative ([CSS21], section 10.2), this computation is floored at 0.

Then if height is 0 you can't make the padding be inside because that implies the height will be negative.

  • 3
    Right, gotcha. That makes sense. – Paul D. Waite Dec 29 '13 at 16:54
10

The declaration of height: 0; is applied. If you leave it at height: auto;, you would see a 20px difference (the height of the line with "Hello!"), making it a total 100px high. With height set to zero, it's only 80px high: padding-top + padding-bottom = 80px

So the answer is: Yes, it's expected behavior.

You could set width and height to any value between 0 and 80px (if you have 40px of padding) and still get the same dimensions.

Update: As Hardy mentioned, using an additional wrapper div gets around this issue.

Demo

HTML:

<div class="div-1">
    <div class="div-2">
        Hello!
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.div-1 {
    padding: 40px;

    /* This is not visible! */
    border: 1px solid dashed;
}
.div-2 {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    height: 0px;
    width: 0px;
    background: red;
    color: white;
    overflow: hidden;
}
  • 1
    So, you’re saying that box-sizing doesn’t have any effect on top and bottom padding? Only left and right? – Paul D. Waite Dec 29 '13 at 16:40
  • 1
    You can't set width: 0; along with padding: 40px; either and making it invisible. Width width and height set to zero, you'll still have a 80px x 80px big box. – kleinfreund Dec 29 '13 at 16:44
  • 1
    Aha, I see. So, with box-sizing: border-box, the browser will set the size of the content area so that the overall width or height of the element is as close to the supplied width/height dimension as possible. But the content area can’t have a negative dimension, so the padding will always be visible. Got it, thank you. – Paul D. Waite Dec 29 '13 at 16:51
  • The definition is a bit squishy when it comes to this point, I understand your confusion. – kleinfreund Dec 29 '13 at 16:52
  • 2
    Another workaround would to add ::before and ::after elements with display: block; height: 40px; to create the same effect as the padding would create, while retaining the ability to set the height to values less than the combined vertical "padding". – Jon z Nov 16 '15 at 15:36

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