13

I want to use tuple consisting of int,char,char in my unordered_map. I am doing like this:

#include <string>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

using namespace std;

tuple <int,char,char> kk;
unordered_map<kk,int> map;

int main()
{
    map[1,"c","b"]=23;
    return 0;
}

but this gives me following errors:

map.cpp:9:21: error: type/value mismatch at argument 1 in template parameter list     for ‘template<class _Key, class _Tp, class _Hash, class _Pred, class _Alloc> class    std::unordered_map’
map.cpp:9:21: error:   expected a type, got ‘kk’
map.cpp:9:21: error: template argument 3 is invalid
map.cpp:9:21: error: template argument 4 is invalid
map.cpp:9:21: error: template argument 5 is invalid
map.cpp:9:26: error: invalid type in declaration before ‘;’ token
map.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
map.cpp:14:16: error: assignment of read-only location ‘"b"[map]’

What I am doing wrong in this?

15

The template arguments for an unordered_map looks like this:

template<

    class Key,
    class T,
    class Hash = std::hash<Key>,
    class KeyEqual = std::equal_to<Key>,
    class Allocator = std::allocator< std::pair<const Key, T> >
> class unordered_map;

std::hash is not specialized for tuples (scroll down to Standard specializations for library types). Therefore you need to provide your own, something like this:

typedef std::tuple<int, char, char> key_t;

struct key_hash : public std::unary_function<key_t, std::size_t>
{
 std::size_t operator()(const key_t& k) const
 {
   return std::get<0>(k) ^ std::get<1>(k) ^ std::get<2>(k);
 }
};
// ..snip..
typedef std::unordered_map<const key_t,data,key_hash,key_equal> map_t;
//                                             ^ this is our custom hash

And finally, as Benjamin Lindley answer already addresses, you need to use std::make_tuple:

// d is data
m[std::make_tuple(1, 'a', 'b')] = d;
auto itr = m.find(std::make_tuple(1, 'a', 'b'));

The code was grabbed from Using a std::tuple as key for std::unordered_map and here is the Live Example.

  • Can you please explain how you have defined key_hash? or what is being done inside key_hash? – Xara Jan 1 '14 at 7:54
  • @Zara See the link for more information. key_hash is defined above. Later, we use it as one of the template arguments (where unordered_map requires a Hash). – user1508519 Jan 1 '14 at 7:56
  • XOR'ing the fields is a terrible hash function. Please do not use this code as-is. See e.g. open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2014/n3876.pdf – jkff Oct 28 '16 at 22:48
11

First error:

map.cpp:9:21: error:   expected a type, got ‘kk’

As the error clearly says, the template parameter needs to be a type. kk is not a type, it is an object. Perhaps you meant to make it a typedef?

typedef tuple <int,char,char> kk;
unordered_map<kk,int> map;

Second error:

map[1,"c","b"]=23;

Two problems here. First, putting commas between values does not make a tuple out of them. You need to be explicit about it, either calling the constructor of your tuple type, or using a function which returns a tuple (e.g. std::make_tuple). Second, your tuple is expecting chars ('c','b'), not strings ("c","b").

map[std::make_tuple(1,'c','b')] = 23;
  • 2
    Wow, that was a fast upvote. How could you have read my answer that fast? – Benjamin Lindley Dec 30 '13 at 7:06
  • No, I didn't upvote yet btw thanks for clearing up the things. :) – Xara Dec 30 '13 at 7:08
  • @Zara: I wasn't suggesting it was you. But whoever it was, it was like 2 seconds after I clicked to upload. – Benjamin Lindley Dec 30 '13 at 7:09
7

As pointed out, std::hash is not specialized for tuples. However, if your tuple consists of standard hashable types like string and int, the following code from generic-hash-for-tuples-in-unordered-map-unordered-set will automatically add such support in c++11.

Just paste the code in a header file and include it whenever needed:

#include <tuple>
// function has to live in the std namespace 
// so that it is picked up by argument-dependent name lookup (ADL).
namespace std{
    namespace
    {

        // Code from boost
        // Reciprocal of the golden ratio helps spread entropy
        //     and handles duplicates.
        // See Mike Seymour in magic-numbers-in-boosthash-combine:
        //     https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4948780

        template <class T>
        inline void hash_combine(std::size_t& seed, T const& v)
        {
            seed ^= hash<T>()(v) + 0x9e3779b9 + (seed<<6) + (seed>>2);
        }

        // Recursive template code derived from Matthieu M.
        template <class Tuple, size_t Index = std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value - 1>
        struct HashValueImpl
        {
          static void apply(size_t& seed, Tuple const& tuple)
          {
            HashValueImpl<Tuple, Index-1>::apply(seed, tuple);
            hash_combine(seed, get<Index>(tuple));
          }
        };

        template <class Tuple>
        struct HashValueImpl<Tuple,0>
        {
          static void apply(size_t& seed, Tuple const& tuple)
          {
            hash_combine(seed, get<0>(tuple));
          }
        };
    }

    template <typename ... TT>
    struct hash<std::tuple<TT...>> 
    {
        size_t
        operator()(std::tuple<TT...> const& tt) const
        {                                              
            size_t seed = 0;                             
            HashValueImpl<std::tuple<TT...> >::apply(seed, tt);    
            return seed;                                 
        }                                              

    };
}
2

I had a requirement of map instead of unordered map:
key was 3-tuple and
value was a 4-tuple

seeing all answers, I was about to change to pairs

but, below worked for me:

// declare a map called map1
map <
  tuple<short, short, short>,
  tuple<short, short, short, short>
> map1;

// insert an element into map1
map1[make_tuple(1, 1, 1)] = make_tuple(0, 0, 1, 1);

// this also worked
map1[{1, 1, 1}] = { 0, 0, 1, 1 };

I am using visual studio community 2015 ide

0

Here is a method to use tuple as a key for an unordered_map without using a hash specialization:

#include <string>
#include <tuple>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <vector>
#include <unordered_map>
using namespace std;

string fToStr(unordered_map<double,int>& dToI,float x)
{
   static int keyVal=0;
   stringstream ss;
   auto iter = dToI.find(x);
   if(iter == dToI.end()) {
      dToI[x]=++keyVal;
      ss << keyVal;
   } else {
      ss <<  iter->second;
   }
   return ss.str();
}

typedef tuple<int,char,char> TICC;
const char ReservedChar=',';
string getKey(TICC& t)
{
   stringstream ss;
   ss << get<0>(t) << ReservedChar << get<1>(t) << ReservedChar << get<2>(t);
   return ss.str();
}

int main()
{
   unordered_map< string,TICC > tupleMp;
   vector<TICC> ticc={make_tuple(1, 'a', 'b'),make_tuple(1, 'b', 'c'),make_tuple(2, 'a', 'b')};
   for(auto t : ticc)
      tupleMp[getKey(t)]=t;

   for(auto t : ticc) {
      string key = getKey(t);
      auto val = tupleMp[key];
      cout << "tupleMp[" << key << "]={" << get<0>(val) << "," << get<1>(val) <<  ","<< get<2>(val) << "} ";
   }
   cout << endl;

   //for float tuple elements use a second float to int key map 
   unordered_map< double,int > dToI;
   vector<float> v{1.234,1.234001,1.234001};
   cout << "\nfloat keys: ";
   for(float f : v)
      cout <<  setprecision(7) << f << "=" << fToStr(dToI,f) << " ";
   cout << endl;
   return 0;
}

Output is:

tupleMp[1,a,b]={1,a,b} tupleMp[1,b,c]={1,b,c} tupleMp[2,a,b]={2,a,b}

float keys: 1.234=1 1.234001=2 1.234001=2

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