4

How would I go about taking a number like 123456 and having it print as 1 2 3 4 5 6?

  • I mean how can I implement spaces in printf final display – MusicianCPlus Jan 18 '10 at 8:29
  • I took at shot at reformatting your question. I'm guessing English isn't your first language, so no worries. :) – GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 8:30
  • Thank you GMan :) Yes exactly this is what I want to achive – MusicianCPlus Jan 18 '10 at 8:32
7

As 'jamesdlin' has mentioned in his comment, GMan's approach would work, however you will need to store it in a buffer in order to print out in the correct order (his algorithm would print out "6 5 4 3 2 1" for input 123456). At this point I'd say that it would be much simpler to just use sprintf as 'therefromhere' suggested in his answer (if this is not an algorithm class assignment of course).

In my opinion the simplest way to do it would be using recursion, this way you can print out digits in the right order without using buffers.

The recursive implementation is very simple:

void PrintfRecursivly(int number)
{
     if (number < 0) 
     {
       number *= -1;
       printf("- ");           
     }
     if (number > 10) 
     {
        PrintfRecursivly(number / 10);
        printf(" ");
     }

     printf("%d", number % 10);     
}

int main()
{
   int number = -78900456;
   PrintfRecursivly(number);

   return 0;
}

Input:

-78900456

Output:

- 7 8 9 0 0 4 5 6

EDIT: Thanks to Steve Jessop who suggested a correct algorithm for positive integers while I was away. I changed the above method to print out correctly for all ints (positive and negative), without the last space.

Please note that we can avoid checking for negative values in every recursion, by doing the check just once (in the main function or wherever) but I didn't write it because we would lose more on clarity than gain in performance.

  • You'd be unlikely to run out of stack space even for large integers too. – dreamlax Jan 18 '10 at 9:02
  • It won't work right for 101 it wil print 1 1 and for 0 it won't print anything. Instead of if(res>0) you should do if(number > 0) and then it will work for anything except 0 and negative numbers. You could then write another function in which you check if number is 0 and print 0, or if number is negative and then you printf '-' and PrintfRecursivly(-number). – Razvi Jan 18 '10 at 9:06
  • I am thankful of your help. – MusicianCPlus Jan 18 '10 at 9:07
  • @Razvi : You are not correct, this will work for all int32 numbers greater or equal to 0. (number >= 0). Even for negative numbers (it is true that at the moment it wouldn't work) its a very simple fix, however I'll let that to the MusicianCPlus. – David Božjak Jan 18 '10 at 9:22
  • 1
    It doesn't work for numbers whose first decimal digit is greater than 1. In those cases it prints a spurious "0 " at the start. It also prints a spurious space at the end - the questioner asks for 1 2 3 4 5 6, not 1 2 3 4 5 6 . But since the questioner accepted this answer, I guess he doesn't mind that, and when he says "numbers like 123456" he means "numbers starting with 1" ;-) – Steve Jessop Jan 18 '10 at 11:16
10

The simplest way of doing this (though not the fastest) would probably be to first sprintf the number to a string buffer, and then loop through the buffer printf-ing one character and one space at a time.

There's no built-in way of doing this within the standard printf formatting.

  • crude, but effective – Hassan Syed Jan 18 '10 at 8:38
  • sprintf in C++ not C? I understand not possible in C and I am yet not very advance in C – MusicianCPlus Jan 18 '10 at 8:49
  • I think sprintf exists in C too. – Razvi Jan 18 '10 at 9:08
  • 4
    sprintf is from c itself and carried forward to c++. – Vijay Jan 18 '10 at 11:26
2

A common method would be to extract each digit, and then print that digit. I won't give you the code, but it's the implemented version of:

int d; // your number

/* While `d` is not zero */
/* Modulus `d` with 10 to extract the last digit */
/* Print it, with your space */
/* Divide by 10 to remove the last digit */
/* Repeat */

This will be backwards. I'll leave it as an exercise to you to fix that. (Hint: In the loop, put the result into an array of characters, and when you're finished start at the last index of the array and print backwards.)

  • 2
    This is the right approach, but don't forget to reverse the string afterward. – jamesdlin Jan 18 '10 at 8:40
  • Oops, totally forgot that. – GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 8:42
2

char buffer[50];
int myNum = 123456;
int n;
int i;

n = snprintf(buffer, sizeof buffer, "%d", myNum);

for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    putchar(buffer[i]);
    putchar(' ');
}

putchar('\n');
0
int number = 123456;
char strNumber[64];
strNumber[0] = '\0';
sprintf_s(strNumber, "%d", number);
int i = 0;
while(strNumber[i] != '\0')
    printf("%c ", strNumber[i++]);
  • 1
    Isn't sprintf_s Microsoft-specific? – dreamlax Jan 18 '10 at 9:03
0

This only works for unsigned integers:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

void print_number(unsigned int number) {
    int n = number, c = 0, p;
    while (n > 0) {
        n /= 10;
        c++;
    }
    for (n = c - 1; n >= 0; n--) {
        p = pow(10, n);
        printf("%d ", number / p);
        number -= number / p * p;
    }
    printf("\n");
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    print_number(1);
    print_number(12);
    print_number(123);
    print_number(1234);
    print_number(12345);
    print_number(1234567);
    print_number(12345678);
    print_number(123456789);
    return 0;
}
0
#include <stdio.h>
int main ()
{
    int a, b, c, d, e;
    printf("Write a number of four figures\n");
    scanf("%d", &a);
    printf("Your number is:\n");

    b = (a - (a % 1000)) / 1000;
    c = ((a - (a % 100)) / 100) - b * 10;
    d = ((a - (a % 10)) / 10) - b * 100 - c * 10;
    e = (a - b * 1000 - c * 100 - d * 10);

    printf("%d\t%d\t", b, c);
    printf("%d\t", d);
    printf("%d", e);

    return 0;
}

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