2

I have a php page with my mysql connection string ($conn) at the top and then I have created a function that I will run later on down the page.

my function has it's own arguments but as I am going to be creating many functions I don't want to have to put my $conn in everyone but unless I do, I cannot connect to the database within the function

For example,

function one ($var1, $var2) {
    //mysql stuff here
}

Does not work because it cannot find the $conn

function one ($var1, $var2, $conn) {
    //mysql stuff here
}

Does work because it has the $conn variable passed in the function

So is there anyway I can create my functions without having to put the $conn in them all?

3
  • It's a common scope issue; php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php You have to use a reference or global access
    – user1467267
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:03
  • @DavidEugenePeterson welll the only thing that will work is putting $conn in my function arguements like function one ($conn...) {
    – user2135867
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:07
  • it's because php is a dynamically typed language you have to explicitly declare that $conn is global, or else it assumes you are defining a new variable called $conn inside the scope of that function....
    – A.O.
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:08

1 Answer 1

2

You can use the global keyword to access $conn from inside a function.

function one ($var1, $var2) {
     //mysql stuff here
     global $conn;

}

See notes on Variable scope for more information.

I suggest using a Constant instead of a variable to hold your connection string:

8
  • I may as well just do the second example in my question?
    – user2135867
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:07
  • 2
    Yukkie, constants. Might aswel just use a Static library for your database. Especially for the situation the OP is in. I +1 the answer tho. Globals are the solution
    – user1467267
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:07
  • Allendar, how often is the cnx string going to change? Most likely never and. Making it a constant will ensure the "$conn" variable name doesn't conflict in any other function across the entire codebase.
    – sikander
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:10
  • @charliejsford Knowing something you do is redundant is already a point where you cut yourself. You should make coding easy, not harder for yourself (and maybe others that have to work in the sam code later on). If you eventually have let's say 50 of these functions, it will be a pain to adjust them all, because your logic changed.
    – user1467267
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:10
  • @Allendar sorry lol, what's your point about having loads of functions?
    – user2135867
    Commented Dec 30, 2013 at 23:12

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