I see Java...

Coming from a Java background, there's something you install to get Java to run - i.e. the JRE. You're able to see the Java executable files right there on your hard drive.

But I don't see JavaScript...

Now enter JavaScript. I'll type something in notepad, save it and open it on my browser. And it works just like magic!

Where exactly is JavaScript? Obviously it's embedded in the browser code, but there must be some core JavaScript library somewhere. Any browser didn't exist at one point, surely they got their core JavaScript code from some source.

In short...

  1. Where is the source code of JavaScript itself? Something like jquery.js, backbone.js ... where is the "javascript.js"?

  2. Who is the authority that establishes the requirements for JavaScript? While the custodian of Java is clearly Oracle, I don't see any counterpart "owner" for JavaScript.

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    I suspect the answers you seek lie here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript – Ennui Dec 31 '13 at 13:22
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    Javascript has no javascript.js. The language is specified and every browser creates it's own implementation which follows (as good as possible) the javascript specification. – hamon Dec 31 '13 at 13:22
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    It's embedded in the browser, and browser vendors use different engines to parse the code, and you can find the source code for those online -> code.google.com/p/v8/wiki/Source – adeneo Dec 31 '13 at 13:23
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    Javascript is ECMAScript: ecmascript.org/docs.php – yochannah Dec 31 '13 at 13:23
  • @Ennui Yup I saw that before posting, it says: Netscape and Mozilla. That confused me: how can 2 groups share ownership? – Question Everything Dec 31 '13 at 13:24
up vote 38 down vote accepted

1) *JavaScript Engines...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript_engine

Which engine is used differs by browser.

For example...

2) Who owns *JavaScript?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript

It was born at Netscape ( first called 'Mocha' ), so it is maintained by Mozilla, i.e...

Netscape created The Mozilla Foundation, long ago, and the Mozilla suite of Firefox, Thunderbird, etc... is where Netscape Communicator went.

But yes, the trademark is technically "owned" by Oracle:

*JavaScript is actually an implementation of ECMAScript!

It is standardized by ECMA: http://www.ecma-international.org/

Language Specification: http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.htm

JavaScript is so integral to so many technologies that it is standardized. As I mentioned, it is maintained by ECMA, just like HTML, XML and CSS are standards maintained by W3C.

( ECMA: European Computer Manufacturers Association )

Node.js... JavaScript has gone beyond the browser engines.

JavaScript is moving in a direction similar to Java too, with things like Node.js happening. Node.js is a JavaScript Engine, without a browser... meaning, JavaScript is now server-side as well as client-side. It is becoming as much a programming language as it is a scripting language, some believe.


In my opinion ... as with other scripting and programming languages, JavaScript is truly owned by the Open Source community. Coders make suggestions about its specification and contribute to its engines. Testers, developers, 'users' and technology manufacturers and inventors who expand JavaScript are the ones who guide it in reality.

The "legal" owners depend on the Open Source community. They benefit from the community, and hold ownership like a trophy, or a title to defend, often just to protect the reliability of the technology as a viable corporate option. Oracle is well known for doing this. They did this with MySQL, VirtualBox, etc. Oracle is more of a curator than an owner.

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    Aaah Engine! That's the keyword. – Question Everything Dec 31 '13 at 13:25
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    Hmm about question 2: who "owns" Javascript? – Question Everything Dec 31 '13 at 13:28
  • @QuestionEverything - Noone owns javascript, but it's currently maintained by Mozilla – adeneo Dec 31 '13 at 13:31
  • Updated my answer for you. – digitalextremist Dec 31 '13 at 13:34
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    @digitalextremist Thank you. That's solid. – Question Everything Dec 31 '13 at 13:37

Javascript (JS) is the client side language and it is embeded into the browser's parser which is actually the core of the browser and control the browser. In parser there are also css, html and other client side languages thats why browser execute the javascript, css, html, xml and other client side languages.

It has also become common in server-side programming, game development and the creation of desktop applications. Its syntax was influenced by C. JavaScript copies many names and naming conventions from Java, but the two languages are otherwise unrelated and have very different semantics. The key design principles within JavaScript are taken from the Self and Scheme programming languages. It is a multi-paradigm language, supporting object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

JavaScript was formalized in the ECMAScript language standard and is primarily used as part of a web browser (client-side JavaScript). This enables programmatic access to computational objects within a host environment.

Javascript appeared in 1995 and designed by Brendan Eich and developer was Netscape Communications Corporation, Mozilla Foundation.

When ever you see the javascript file it has extension of js (javascript).

JavaScript was born at Sun Microsystems. It was used under license for technology invented and implemented by Netscape Communications and current entities such as the Mozilla Foundation.

jQuery is written in javascript language.

jQuery is a cross-platform, fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library and greatly simplifies JavaScript programming.

See also the link

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript_engine

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript

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