5

I'm trying to split an index_sequence into two halves. For that, I generate an index_sequence with the lower half and use it to skip the leading elements on the full index_sequence. The following is a minimal test case that represents what I'm trying to achieve:

template <int ...I>
struct index_sequence {};

template <int ...I, int ...J>
void foo(index_sequence<I...>, index_sequence<I..., J...>)
{}

int main()
{
    foo(index_sequence<0>{}, index_sequence<0, 1>{});
}

I've tried this with the latest versions of Clang, GCC and MSVC, and they all fail to deduce J.... Is this allowed by the standard? If not, why and what would be a good way to achieve my intent?

3
  • 2
    You could make a template<int... I> struct bar { template<int... J> void foo(index_sequence<I..., J...>); };, or use template <int ...I, int ...J> void foo(index_sequence<I...>, index_sequence<J...>) {} and split the seq in another step.
    – dyp
    Commented Jan 1, 2014 at 23:58
  • Are your sequences always [0,N] and [0,N+x]? Because it would be much simpler to generate an index_sequence with [N,N+x] in the first place than to perform a general prefix-stripping or set difference.
    – Casey
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 3:58
  • @Casey: No. Shifting a sequence is considerably easy. This question is about the general case where you have half an index_sequence and you need to get the remaining half in O(1) instantiations.
    – K-ballo
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

9

If what you want is to split a std::index_sequence instead of removing the common prefix of two std::index_sequences, I think you can benefit from an implementation of slice and using it to split a std::index_sequence into pieces.

I'm going to omit the implementation of std::index_sequence and friends, since you can refer to the paper, N3658, and a sample implementation here.

make_index_range

To implement slice, we'll use a helper called make_integer_range. We want a std::index_sequence generator which gives us [Begin, End) instead of [0, End). Leveraging std::make_integer_sequence, we get:

template <typename T, typename Seq, T Begin>
struct make_integer_range_impl;

template <typename T, T... Ints, T Begin>
struct make_integer_range_impl<T, std::integer_sequence<T, Ints...>, Begin> {
  using type = std::integer_sequence<T, Begin + Ints...>;
};

/* Similar to std::make_integer_sequence<>, except it goes from [Begin, End)
   instead of [0, End). */
template <typename T, T Begin, T End>
using make_integer_range = typename make_integer_range_impl<
    T, std::make_integer_sequence<T, End - Begin>, Begin>::type;

/* Similar to std::make_index_sequence<>, except it goes from [Begin, End)
   instead of [0, End). */
template <std::size_t Begin, std::size_t End>
using make_index_range = make_integer_range<std::size_t, Begin, End>;

slice

Since we don't have a std::get-like functionality for std::index_sequence or a variadic template pack, we just build a temporary std::array to get us std::get. Then explode the array with only the slice we want.

template <std::size_t... Indices, std::size_t... I>
constexpr decltype(auto) slice_impl(
      std::index_sequence<Indices...>,
      std::index_sequence<I...>) {
  using Array = std::array<std::size_t, sizeof...(Indices)>;
  return std::index_sequence<std::get<I>(Array{{Indices...}})...>();
}

template <std::size_t Begin, std::size_t End, std::size_t... Indices>
constexpr decltype(auto) slice(std::index_sequence<Indices...> idx_seq) {
  return slice_impl(idx_seq, make_index_range<Begin, End>());
}

split_at

One example of using the slice we just built is to write a split_at function. We specify the index at which we want to split the std::index_sequence, and return a pair of std::index_sequences split at the given index.

template <std::size_t At, std::size_t... Indices>
constexpr decltype(auto) split_at(index_sequence<Indices...> idx_seq) {
    return std::make_pair(slice<0, At>(idx_seq), 
                          slice<At, sizeof...(Indices)>(idx_seq));
}

Examples of split_at:

static_assert(std::is_same<
                decltype(split_at<2>(index_sequence<1, 4, 2>())),
                std::pair<index_sequence<1, 4>, index_sequence<2>>>(), "");

static_assert(std::is_same<
                decltype(split_at<1>(index_sequence<1, 4, 2, 3>())),
                std::pair<index_sequence<1>, index_sequence<4, 2, 3>>>(), "");
6
  • Interesting idea that of turning an std::index_sequence into an std::array to then use it like an std::tuple.
    – K-ballo
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 15:19
  • @mpark What's std::common_type here for?
    – LogicStuff
    Commented Jul 8, 2016 at 21:01
  • @LogicStuff: Haha that was me being overly fancy and using std::common_type with a single type as "identity". std::common_type actually can't be used as an "identity" so I've edited the answer.
    – mpark
    Commented Jul 8, 2016 at 21:45
  • I'm already using your code and it seems to work without anything special. Just struct make_integer_range_impl<T, std::integer_sequence<T, Ints...>, Begin> : std::integer_sequence<T, (Begin + Ints)...> {};
    – LogicStuff
    Commented Jul 8, 2016 at 22:24
  • Is it possible to implement slice and slice_impl using C++11? Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 20:52
6

14.8.2.5/9 ... If the template argument list of P contains a pack expansion that is not the last template argument, the entire template argument list is a non-deduced context...

Thus, when comparing index_sequence<I..., J...> with index_sequence<0, 1>{}, neither I... nor J... can be deduced.

6
  • 1
    "neither I... nor J... can be deduced" from the second argument. I can still be deduced from the first argument.
    – dyp
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 0:03
  • @DyP: But the quote says the entire argument list is a non-deduced context. Which means J won't be deduced even if I can
    – Andy Prowl
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 0:05
  • @AndyProwl Indeed. I'm being a bit nit-picky here ;)
    – dyp
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 0:07
  • I'm not entirely sure how to interpret that paragraph. Obviously template <int ...I, int ...J> void foo(index_sequence<I...>, index_sequence<J...>) works and both I and J are deduced correctly... would you care to elaborate how that paragraph applies to this variation?
    – K-ballo
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 0:09
  • @K-ballo Yeah, the context is missing. That quote is about a single parameter P of a function template, where the parameter type has a template argument list.
    – dyp
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 0:12
2

To get suffix, you may use something like:

template<int ... I> struct get_suffix_helper {
    template<int ... J> static index_sequence<J...> foo(index_sequence<I..., J...>);
};

template<typename T1, typename T2> struct get_suffix;

template<int ... Is1, int ... Is2>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<Is1...>, index_sequence<Is2...>> :
    public decltype(get_suffix_helper<Is1...>::foo(std::declval<index_sequence<Is2...>>())) {};

static_assert(std::is_base_of<index_sequence<>,
                              get_suffix<index_sequence<1, 2>,
                                         index_sequence<1, 2>>>::value, "error");

static_assert(std::is_base_of<index_sequence<42>,
                              get_suffix<index_sequence<1, 2>,
                                         index_sequence<1, 2, 42>>>::value, "error");

Or, with some error check:

template <typename T1, typename T2> struct get_suffix;

template<int ...Is>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<>, index_sequence<Is...>>
{
    typedef index_sequence<Is...> type;
    static const bool valid = true;
};

template<int ...Is>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<Is...>, index_sequence<>>
{
    typedef void type;
    static const bool valid = false;
};

template<>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<>, index_sequence<>>
{
    typedef index_sequence<> type;
    static const bool valid = true;
};

template<int N, int ...Is, int... Js>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<N, Is...>, index_sequence<N, Js...>>
{
    typedef typename get_suffix<index_sequence<Is...>, index_sequence<Js...>>::type type;
    static const bool valid = get_suffix<index_sequence<Is...>, index_sequence<Js...>>::valid;
};

template<int N1, int N2, int ...Is, int... Js>
struct get_suffix<index_sequence<N1, Is...>, index_sequence<N2, Js...>>
{
    typedef void type;
    static const bool valid = false;
};

static_assert(std::is_same<index_sequence<>,
                           get_suffix<index_sequence<1, 2>,
                                      index_sequence<1, 2>>::type>::value, "error");

static_assert(!get_suffix<index_sequence<1, 2, 42>, index_sequence<1, 2>>::valid, "error");
static_assert(!get_suffix<index_sequence<0, 2, 1>, index_sequence<0, 1, 2>>::valid, "error");

static_assert(std::is_same<index_sequence<42>,
                           get_suffix<index_sequence<1, 2>,
                                      index_sequence<1, 2, 42>>::type>::value, "error");
2
  • The number of instantiations in a recursive solution is of linear complexity, which tends to perform poorly at compile time.
    – K-ballo
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 1:13
  • @K-ballo: Added an improved version (but without error checking)
    – Jarod42
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 1:17
0

Not an answer, but a workaround: recursively trim off the leading elements a la:

template <typename, typename> struct remove_prefix;

template <std::size_t... I>
struct remove_prefix<index_sequence<>, index_sequence<I...>> {
  using type = index_sequence<I...>;
};

template <std::size_t First, std::size_t... I, std::size_t... J>
struct remove_prefix<index_sequence<First, I...>,
                     index_sequence<First, J...>> {
  using type = typename remove_prefix<index_sequence<I...>,
                                      index_sequence<J...>>::type;
};

Demo at Coliru.

1
  • The number of instantiations in a recursive solution is of linear complexity, which tends to perform poorly at compile time.
    – K-ballo
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 1:11
0

I needed to split an index_sequence into a head and tail at a particular point and this was the implementation that I came up with:

template<size_t N, typename Lseq, typename Rseq>
struct split_sequence_impl;

template<size_t N, size_t L1, size_t...Ls, size_t...Rs>
struct split_sequence_impl<N,index_sequence<L1,Ls...>,index_sequence<Rs...>>  { 
  using next = split_sequence_impl<N-1,index_sequence<Ls...>,index_sequence<Rs...,L1>>;
  using head = typename next::head;
  using tail = typename next::tail;
};

template<size_t L1, size_t...Ls, size_t...Rs>
struct split_sequence_impl<0,index_sequence<L1,Ls...>,index_sequence<Rs...>> {
  using tail = index_sequence<Ls...>;
  using head = index_sequence<Rs...,L1>;
};

template<typename seq, size_t N> 
using split_sequence = split_sequence_impl<N-1,seq,empty_sequence>;

template<typename seq, size_t N>
using sequence_head_t = typename split_sequence<seq,N>::head;

template<typename seq, size_t N>
using sequence_tail_t = typename split_sequence<seq,N>::tail;

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