146

Let's say I have the following entities:

public class Parent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}
public class Child
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int ParentId { get; set; }
}

What is the code first fluent API syntax to enforce that ParentId is created in the database with a foreign key constraint to the Parents table, without the need to have a navigation property?

I know that if I add a navigation property Parent to Child, then I can do this:

modelBuilder.Entity<Child>()
    .HasRequired<Parent>(c => c.Parent)
    .WithMany()
    .HasForeignKey(c => c.ParentId);

But I don't want the navigation property in this particular case.

6
  • 1
    I dont think this is actually possible with just EF, you probably need to use some raw SQL in a manual migration to set it up
    – undefined
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 15:35
  • @LukeMcGregor that is what I feared. If you make that an answer I'll be glad to accept it, assuming it is correct. :-) Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 16:22
  • Is there any specific reason for not having the navigation property? Would making the navigation property private work for you - wouldn't be visible outside the entity but would please EF. (Note I have not tried this but I think this should work - take a look at this post about mapping private properties romiller.com/2012/10/01/…)
    – Pawel
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 23:26
  • 15
    Well I don't want it because I don't need it. I don't like having to put extra unnecessary stuff in a design just to satisfy the requirements of a framework. Would it kill me to put in the nav prop? No. In fact that's what I've done for the time being. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 2:46
  • You always need navigation property on at least one side to build a relation. For more information stackoverflow.com/a/7105288/105445 Commented Mar 13, 2014 at 12:50

6 Answers 6

205

Although this post is for Entity Framework not Entity Framework Core, It might be useful for someone who wants to achieve the same thing using Entity Framework Core (I am using V1.1.2).

I don't need navigation properties (although they're nice) because I am practicing DDD and I want Parent and Child to be two separate aggregate roots. I want them to be able to talk to each other via foreign key not through infrastructure-specific Entity Framework navigation properties.

All you have to do is to configure the relationship on one side using HasOne and WithMany without specifying the navigation properties (they're not there after all).

public class AppDbContext : DbContext
{
    public AppDbContext(DbContextOptions<AppDbContext> options) : base(options) {}

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
    {
        ......

        builder.Entity<Parent>(b => {
            b.HasKey(p => p.Id);
            b.ToTable("Parent");
        });

        builder.Entity<Child>(b => {
            b.HasKey(c => c.Id);
            b.Property(c => c.ParentId).IsRequired();

            // Without referencing navigation properties (they're not there anyway)
            b.HasOne<Parent>()    // <---
                .WithMany()       // <---
                .HasForeignKey(c => c.ParentId);

            // Just for comparison, with navigation properties defined,
            // (let's say you call it Parent in the Child class and Children
            // collection in Parent class), you might have to configure them 
            // like:
            // b.HasOne(c => c.Parent)
            //     .WithMany(p => p.Children)
            //     .HasForeignKey(c => c.ParentId);

            b.ToTable("Child");
        });
        
        ......
    }
}

I am giving out examples on how to configure entity properties as well, but the most important one here is HasOne<>, WithMany() and HasForeignKey().

Multiple bounded contexts scenario

If you have your Entity Framework entities defined in multiple projects (trying to follow BoundedContext pattern), b.HasOne<Parent>() won't work either!

For example, you have an entity called VehicleType from one project, and ServicePricing entity from another project, and they're one-to-many: one vehicle type can have multiple pricings (because they're versioned):

namespace DL.VehicleManagement.Data.EFCore.Entities
{
    public class VehicleType
    {
        public Guid Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; } = null!;
        ...
    }
}

namespace DL.Pricing.Data.EFCore.Entities
{
    public class ServicePricing
    {
        public Guid Id { get; set; }
        
        public Guid VehicleTypeId { get; set; }
        public int Version { get; set; }

        ...
    }
}

If they were in one project, you can set their relationship even without using navigation properties as described at the beginning:

public class ServicePricingConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<ServicePricing>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<ServicePricing> builder)
    {
        builder.HasKey(x => x.Id);

        // Setup composite key
        builder.HasAlternateKey(x => new { x.VehicleTypeId, x.Version });

        builder.HasOne<VehicleType>()
            .WithMany()
            .HasForeignKey(x => x.VehicleTypeId);

        ...
    }
}

However, that would give you errors when those entities exist in different projects.

But if you think about it twice, you shouldn't import VehicleManagement.Data.EFCore into Pricing.Data.EFCore (hard referencing) anyway, just because they're in two different contexts!

What I can do is to leave the VehicleTypeId in ServicePricing as it is. I can still query a collection of service pricings by the vehicle type Id (soft referencing).

I guess the last thing I can do on VehicleTypeId is to setup indexes on it, which normally setting up as foreign key would do too:

public class ServicePricingConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<ServicePricing>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<ServicePricing> builder)
    {
        builder.HasKey(x => x.Id);

        // Setup composite key
        builder.HasAlternateKey(x => new { x.VehicleTypeId, x.Version });

        builder.HasIndex(x => x.VehicleTypeId)
            .IsUnique(false)
            .IsClustered(false);

        ...
    }
}
18
  • 20
    This is the correct answer for EF Core, and for those practicing DDD, this is a MUST. Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 2:07
  • 1
    I'm not clear on what has changed to remove the navigational property. Can you please clarify? Commented Feb 22, 2019 at 20:31
  • 3
    @andrew.rockwell: See the HasOne<Parent>() and .WithMany() on thie child configuration. They don't reference the navigation properties at all, since there is no navigation properties defined anyway. I will try to make it clearer with my updates. Commented Feb 22, 2019 at 21:56
  • 3
    @mirind4 unrelated to the specific code sample in the OP, if you're mapping different aggregate root entities to their respective DB tables, according to DDD, those root entites should only reference one another via their identity, and should not contain a full reference to the other AR entity. In fact, in DDD it's also common to make the identity of entities a value object instead of using props with primitive types like int/log/guid (especially AR entities), avoiding primitive obsession and also allowing different ARs to reference entities via the value object ID type. HTH Commented May 18, 2020 at 19:15
  • 1
    Kudos for using clear domain-specific naming (parent, child, parentId). This makes the code absolutely easy to understand.
    – Dima
    Commented Feb 9, 2022 at 16:03
68
+50

With EF Code First Fluent API it is impossible. You always need at least one navigation property to create a foreign key constraint in the database.

If you are using Code First Migrations you have the option to add a new code based migration on the package manager console (add-migration SomeNewSchemaName). If you changed something with your model or mapping a new migration will be added. If you didn't change anything force a new migration by using add-migration -IgnoreChanges SomeNewSchemaName. The migration will only contain empty Up and Down methods in this case.

Then you can modify the Up method by adding the follwing to it:

public override void Up()
{
    // other stuff...

    AddForeignKey("ChildTableName", "ParentId", "ParentTableName", "Id",
        cascadeDelete: true); // or false
    CreateIndex("ChildTableName", "ParentId"); // if you want an index
}

Running this migration (update-database on package manage console) will run a SQL statement similar to this (for SQL Server):

ALTER TABLE [ChildTableName] ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_SomeName]
FOREIGN KEY ([ParentId]) REFERENCES [ParentTableName] ([Id])

CREATE INDEX [IX_SomeName] ON [ChildTableName] ([ParentId])

Alternatively, without migrations, you could just run a pure SQL command using

context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(sql);

where context is an instance of your derived context class and sql is just the above SQL command as string.

Be aware that with all this EF has no clue that ParentId is a foreign key that describes a relationship. EF will consider it only as an ordinary scalar property. Somehow all the above is only a more complicated and slower way compared to just opening a SQL management tool and to add the constraint by hand.

4
  • 2
    The simplification comes from the automation: I don't have access to other environments to which my code is deployed. Being able to perform these changes in code is nice for me. But I like the snark :)
    – pomeroy
    Commented Dec 30, 2016 at 19:45
  • I think you also just set an attribute on the entity, so on parent id, just add [ForeignKey("ParentTableName")]. That will link the property to whatever the key is on the parent table. Now you've got a hard-coded table name though.
    – Triynko
    Commented Feb 27, 2018 at 17:12
  • 4
    It's clearly not impossible, see the other comment below Why is this even marked as correct answer
    – Igor Be
    Commented Jun 22, 2019 at 15:20
  • > Why is this even marked as correct answer -- I guess because this answer is from 2014, and the actual correct answer from Jonatan Dragon is from 2019 ;) Commented Mar 5, 2021 at 6:59
47

In case of EF Core you don't necessarily need to provide a navigation property. You can simply provide a Foreign Key on one side of the relationship. A simple example with Fluent API:

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace EFModeling.Configuring.FluentAPI.Samples.Relationships.NoNavigation
{
    class MyContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Post> Posts { get; set; }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
             modelBuilder.Entity<Post>()
                .HasOne<Blog>()
                .WithMany()
                .HasForeignKey(p => p.BlogId);
        }
    }

    public class Blog
    {
         public int BlogId { get; set; }
         public string Url { get; set; }
    }

    public class Post
    {
         public int PostId { get; set; }
         public string Title { get; set; }
         public string Content { get; set; }

        public int BlogId { get; set; }
    }
}
1
  • 2
    This solution is really nice as it makes the definition of entities much leaner, simple and loosely coupled with the ORM that is being used.
    – Sirch Dcmp
    Commented Jul 17, 2021 at 6:43
22

Small hint for those, who want to use DataAnotations and don't want to expose Navigation Property - use protected

public class Parent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}
public class Child
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int ParentId { get; set; }

    protected virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
}

Thats it - the foreign key with cascade:true after Add-Migration will be created.

4
  • 1
    It can even by private Commented Aug 20, 2015 at 16:15
  • 2
    When creating Child would you have to assign Parent or just ParentId? Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 16:10
  • 6
    @MarcWittke virtual properties can't be private.
    – Jéf Bueno
    Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 14:28
  • @GeorgeMauer: that's a good question! Technically either one would work, but it also becomes problems when you have inconsistent codes like this, because developers (especially new comers) are not sure what to pass in. Commented Feb 22, 2019 at 22:21
6

I'm using .Net Core 3.1, EntityFramework 3.1.3. I have been searching around and the Solution I came up with was using the generic version of HasForeginKey<DependantEntityType>(e => e.ForeginKeyProperty). you can create a one to one relation like so:

builder.entity<Parent>()
.HasOne<Child>()
.WithOne<>()
.HasForeginKey<Child>(c => c.ParentId);

builder.entity<Child>()
    .Property(c => c.ParentId).IsRequired();

Hope this helps or at least provides some other ideas on how to use the HasForeginKey method.

0
0

My reason for not using navigation properties is class dependencies. I separated my models to few assemblies, which can be used or not used in different projects in any combinations. So if I have entity which has nagivation property to class from another assembly, I need to reference that assembly, which I want to avoid (or any project which uses part of that complete data model will carry everything with it).

And I have separate migration app, which is used for migrations (I use automigrations) and initial DB creation. This project references everything by obvious reasons.

Solution is C-style:

  • "copy" file with target class to migration project via link (drag-n-drop with alt key in VS)
  • disable nagivation property (and FK attribute) via #if _MIGRATION
  • set that preprocessor definition in migration app and don't set in model project, so it will not reference anything (don't reference assembly with Contact class in example).

Sample:

    public int? ContactId { get; set; }

#if _MIGRATION
    [ForeignKey(nameof(ContactId))]
    public Contact Contact { get; set; }
#endif

Of course you should same way disable using directive and change namespace.

After that all consumers can use that property as usual DB field (and don't reference additional assemblies if they aren't needed), but DB server will know that it is FK and can use cascading. Very dirty solution. But works.

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