18

I'm still trying to get my head around using loops to plot in R. I would like to plot (any plot to visualise the data will do) columns z_1 against z_2 in the data frame below according to the different names in column x_1.

x_1 <- c("A1", "A1","A1", "B10", "B10", "B10","B10", "C100", "C100", "C100")


z_1 <- rnorm(10, 70) 

z_2 <- rnorm(10, 1.7)

A <- data.frame(x_1, z_1, z_2)

As such, I would like to end up with three different plots; one for category A1, one for B10 and another for C100. I can do this using three different codes but I would like to be able to use a loop or any other single code to execute all three plots on the same page. In reality, I have a large dataset (4,000 rows) and would like to plot a couple of IDs on a page (say 5 on a page).

I hope this makes sense. Thanks for your help.

Here's my attempt at plotting them individually:

for A1:

data_A1 <- A[which(A$x_1 == "A1"), ]
plot(data_A1$z_2, data_A1$z_1)

I also tried something like this but getting error messages

for ( i in A$x_1[[i]]){

plot(A[which(A$x_1==A$x_1[[i]]), ], aspect = 1)
}
5
  • 3
    If you showed an actual attempt that you've made thus far, and explain how it didn't work, I might be tempted to help.
    – joran
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 21:32
  • @joran, I'll edit my post to include my attempt so far. Thanks.
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 21:39
  • 1
    Small thing, but you're making the common mistake of over-using which. Try running x <- runif(10), then compare x[x < 0.5] and x[which(x < 0.5)]. As in your code above, you can omit which to get the same result. Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 23:27
  • @ Shujaa, any chance you could help re-write my original code to make it work?
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 23:58
  • @John I'll add an answer dissecting where your code doesn't work, but we'll basically arrive at Mark's answer. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 0:08

5 Answers 5

23

Just to understand why your original code didn't work:

Setting up data works fine

x_1 <- c("A1", "A1", "A1", "B10", "B10", "B10","B10", "C100", "C100", "C100")
z_1 <- rnorm(10, 70) 
z_2 <- rnorm(10, 1.7)
A <- data.frame(x_1, z_1, z_2)

The individual plot works fine, but as I said in a comment, the which is unnecessary

data_A1 <- A[which(A$x_1 == "A1"), ] # your way
plot(data_A1$z_2, data_A1$z_1)

data_A1 <- A[A$x_1 == "A1", ]    # deleting which() makes it cleaner
with(data_A1, plot(z_2, z_1))    # you can also use with() to save typing

Now the for loop. Let's review a simple for loop in R (pretty close to the example in ?"for"):

for (i in 1:5) {
   print(1:i)
}

Pretty straightforward, 1:5 is c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), so first i is 1, then 2, etc. Your for loop has a problem in that first line:

for (i in A$x_1[[i]]) { ## already a problem

First i is A$x_1[[i]]? That won't work, i isn't defined yet. Also, A$x_1 is a vector, not a list, so you shouldn't be using [[ to subset it. But we don't want a subset yet, we want a vector of the values i should take. What we want in this case is for (i in c("A1", "B10", "C100")), but we also want to do it programmatically instead of typing out all the different possibilities. There's a couple common ways to get that:

unique(A$x_1) # as in Mark's solution
levels(A$x_1) # works because A$x_1 is a factor

We can put either of those expressions after the in. I changed your [[ to [ in the plot call. [[ is for lists only. I also took out the unnecessary which()

for (i in unique(A$x_1)) {   # this line is good
    plot(A[A$x_1==A$x_1[i], ], aspect = 1)  # still a problem
}

Let's remind ourselves what values i is taking: "A1", "B10", "C100". What's A$x_1 == A$x_1["A1"] going to give? Nothing useful.

for (i in unique(A$x_1)) {  
    plot(A[A$x_1 == i, ], aspect = 1)  # getting there
}

The above code plots something, and it's neat, but it's not what you want. There's a bunch of warnings, all of them telling us that aspect isn't a valid argument, so we'll delete it. Looking at the plot, you'll see that it's plotting 3 variables, because we haven't told it what to put on the x and y axes.

for (i in unique(A$x_1)) {   
    plot(A[A$x_1==i, "z_2"], A[A$x_1==i, "z_1"])  # z_2 on x, z_1 on y 
}   # Works!!!

Notice that this is almost identical to Mark's answer. You don't have to use i and j in for loops, he used cat. It's good practice to use a more descriptive name. Now let's fancy it up a little:

for (i in unique(A$x_1)) {   
    plot(A[A$x_1==i, "z_2"], A[A$x_1==i, "z_1"],
         xlim = range(A$z_2), ylim = range(A$z_1), # base the axes on full data range
         main = paste("Plot of", i))  # Give each a title
}

Next time: don't forget that you can run tiny pieces of code to see what they are. If you have a line like for (i in A$x_1[[i]]) that you're not sure if it's right, enter A$x_1[[i]] at the console, hopefully that will help you figure out that you haven't defined i, so you'll change it to

for (i in A$x_1)

then you run A$x_1 and realize it's length is 10. You want 3 graphs, not 10, so you need i to take 3 values, all of them different, etc.

1
  • 4
    that was brilliant! This is probably the best answer I've ever received from this forum. Now I understand loops a lot better. thanks shujaa.
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 20:57
19

A simple approach with loops would be

for (cat in unique(x_1)){
  d <- subset(A, x_1 == cat)
  plot(d$z_1, d$z_2)
}

unique(x_1) gets you all the unique values of x_1. Then, for each of these values get a corresponding subset and use this subset for plotting.

6
  • @ Mark Heckmann, Thank you so much for the codes, it works beautifully. I'm trying to edit it to make it plot all three on a single page using the layout function-not quite there yet.
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 21:56
  • @ Mark Heckmann, I've just had a second look at the code. I'm not too sure why i'm getting just the C100 category as an output for d in the above code. Why does it give the C100 category as opposed to A1 or B10?
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 22:22
  • @John I cannot reproduce you problem, please elaborate. For me it works fine. Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 22:24
  • I'm really sry to bother you. I've just executed the code again to be sure. My output for d <- subset(A, x_1==cat) gives me the ff 3 rows: 8 C100 71.08877 1.892950, 9 C100 71.29257 1.144764, 10 C100 71.28251 1.974991. Is this not what you're getting?
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 22:32
  • 1
    @John The point of the for loop is that d gets overwritten each time, once for each unique value of x_1. Since C100 is the last value, when the for loop is finished d will be in it's final state. Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 23:31
3

Perhaps you don´t need a loop. Try using ggplots facet_grid(). Here is the documentation, full of examples.

library(ggplot2)
library(reshape2)

melted_a <- melt(A)


ggplot(melted_a, aes(variable, value)) +
  geom_jitter() +
  facet_grid(. ~ x_1)

ggplot(melted_a, aes(variable, value)) +
  geom_jitter() +
  facet_grid(variable ~ x_1)

Edit Perhaps this solves this problem. But if you need to do many plots that have a similar structure, you could make a function and use aes_string() instead of aes(). Note: I'm not an expert at writing functions, so probably someone could edit and improve it. (not tested)

ggplot_fun <- function(data, x, y, rowfacet, colfacet, ...){
  p <- ggplot(data, aes_string(x, y))
  p <- p + geom_jitter()
  p <- p + facet_grid(as.formula(sprintf("%s ~ %s", rowfacet, colfacet))
}

ggplot_fun(melted_a, variable, value, variable, x_1)

Idea taken from this question.

1
  • @ Martin Bel, thank you so much for the useful references and codes, I shall take my time to read through them all.
    – John_dydx
    Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 21:57
1

You also tweak around the data, for example like I did here....

If I want datewise plots and xlab, ylab and title of the plot to have specific details...

 for ( i in 1:length(unique(wheeldata$Date)) ){
     d <- subset( wheeldata, Date == unique ( wheeldata$Date )[i] )
     plot(d$X, d$Y, xlab = "X", ylab = "Y", main = paste0("Date: ",  unique(d$Date)) )
 }
0
ggplot_fun <- function(data, x, y, rowfacet, colfacet, ...){
p <- ggplot(data, aes_string(x, y))
p <- p + geom_jitter()
p <- p + facet_grid(as.formula(sprintf("%s ~ %s", rowfacet, colfacet))
}

ggplot_fun(melted_a, variable, value, variable, x_1)

I have tried the code above within a loop, but it didn't work. I just figured out that the print function is required to make it work. In case someone uses it and thinks it doesn't work.

1
  • Would you mind editing the code so that it includes the print function as you mentioned? If someone inexperienced with R comes about this answer, they may not know what to do exactly. Commented Nov 25, 2022 at 17:48

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