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To count the number of files in a directory, I typically use

ls directory | wc -l

But is there another command that doesn't use wc ?

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  • 27
    What exactly is the problem with wc that prevents you from using it?
    – vanza
    Jan 3, 2014 at 2:04
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    Not really. Unix commands are generally intended to be used this way, chained in pipes. Jan 3, 2014 at 2:04
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    I am connecting via ssh to another host to access some data . Unfortunately a bunch of basic commands don't seem to work on this host . If I use wc it returns "unrecognized command" . So I am looking for other options .
    – Kantura
    Jan 3, 2014 at 2:25
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    Use the tree command. It will give you the tree and at the bottom tell you how many files and directories there are. If you want hidden files also use tree -a. Mar 3, 2015 at 21:20
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    @vanza "What exactly is the problem with wc" , what if a file has a \n in the file name? Yes, extremely unlikely! But still technically valid and possible. Jun 26, 2015 at 5:57

1 Answer 1

744

this is one:

ls -l . | egrep -c '^-'

Note:

ls -1 | wc -l

Which means: ls: list files in dir

-1: (that's a ONE) only one entry per line. Change it to -1a if you want hidden files too

|: pipe output onto...

wc: "wordcount"

-l: count lines.

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    No wait . I made a booboo . You are absolutely right Sajad Lfc . ls -1 dir | egrep -c '' This returns the number of files in dir . Thanks .
    – Kantura
    Jan 3, 2014 at 2:31
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    @runios that's because ls -l returns an additional line at the top adding up the file sizes for a total amount. You should use ls -1 and not the ls -l. Also if one wants hidden files but without the directories . and .. you should use ls -1A | wc -l Mar 7, 2018 at 11:02
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    A weird favourite of mine: find . -type f -printf "." | wc -c
    – Luke H
    Aug 30, 2019 at 13:52
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    An effective native way without using pipe: du --inodes [root@cs-1-server-01 million]# du --inodes 1000001 ./vdb.1_1.dir 1000003 . [root@cs-1-server-01 million]# Jan 9, 2020 at 7:28
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    Isn't this one against the tradition of not parsing ls? May 14, 2020 at 12:55

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