3

Is it possible to override vals or defs in the subclass's constructor? I want to initialize (or set) trait's members or abstract class's members in the subclass's constructor as parameters.

The following is an example.

trait A {
  def memberDef: Int => String
  val memberVal: String
}

class B(
    override val memberDef: Int => String,
    override val memberVal: String)
  extends A {
  ...
}

Here, class B's memberDef overrides trait A's memberDef, and class B's memberVal overrides trait A's memberVal.

When I compiled this, there was no error. However, I want to know whether there are any bugs in this implementation, or whther there is a better implementation.

3

The answer to the title of the post is yes. For the most part.

It is hard to say what might be a "better" implementation since I don't know what you are trying to accomplish with this code (besides a proof of concept). But there are two things to consider.

You don't generally want a trait with a val in it. There are tricky, well-documented initialization problems solved only by using lazy val or def at the trait level. Also, while def in a trait can be implemented by a def, val, lazy val or object, val in a trait can only be implemented by val. So there is a lot less flexibility there.

The other thing to consider is less about Scala syntax but more general object design. I know your example is contrived, but just keep in mind you have created a leaky abstraction by giving the caller a way of altering the public API of B. Leaky abstractions are never good.

5

I would like to add one more possible solution using early initializers:

class B(memberDefParam: Int => String, memberValParam: String) extends {
  val memberVal: String = memberValParam
} with A {
  val memberDef: Int => String = memberDefParam
}

I would use this because Martin Odersky said that if you use early initializers you have achieved the holy grail - Level L3: Expert library designer: http://www.scala-lang.org/old/node/8610

By the way overriding a public method by a function provided as a constructor argument doesn't look nice to me at all, but that's another story.

  • This is quite clever. – Vidya Jan 3 '14 at 7:36
  • 1
    "I would use this because Martin Odersky said that if you use early initializers you have achieved the holy grail - Level L3: Expert library designer: scala-lang.org/old/node/8610" I'd say this is exactly the opposite of his meaning. An expert library designer should understand why and when to use these features, not just how to use them (of course, same applies to all other levels). – Alexey Romanov Jan 3 '14 at 10:50
  • 2
    L3 really isn't the holy grail! If I can draw an analogy to judo, then L3 would be your black belt. After that you have several dan grades, olympic medals, etc. to strive for. Just wait until you get to macros :) – Kevin Wright Jan 3 '14 at 13:32

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