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It is recommended to use a minified version of CSS for production environments, as minified versions of CSS loads faster; but what makes a minified version of CSS load faster?

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    because it has lesser code!! :)
    – NoobEditor
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:12
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    Less characters in a file = less file size = faster download time. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:13
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    ok how come it has the lesser codes?
    – Ihsahs
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:13
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    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minification_(programming)
    – techfoobar
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:13
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    Worth noting - because it's not immediately apparent to logical thinking - that spaces and other whitespace characters are still characters, and hence increase the file size. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 12:00

3 Answers 3

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"Minified" CSS (or javascript, or HTML or whatever) is a version of a file that has been reduced in size - normally by some automated process.

The aim of minimising is to make it smaller, and thus quicker to download, without changing the behaviour of the code / markup / whatever.

For CSS this is normally just a case of reducing the amount of whitespace and removing comments. Basically taking out characters that will have no effect on the behaviour.

The downside of minimising is that it makes the file more difficult for humans to read. many of the 'superfluous' characters are used to make the files more readable.

It is for this reason that minified versions are generally only used in production environments - or where the file is not intended to be changed by the developer (e.g. a jQuery library).

It is usually an automated process so that developers can work on a human readable version, and then the files are minimised as the deployment is made to production.

For other file types (Javascript, HTML, etc) the minimisation process may go further than just remove superfluous characters. For example variable, function and class names will be shortened (e.g. thingThatMeansSomethingToYou may become a).

In all cases the aim is the same - behaviour of the code remains the same, but the size of the file is reduced.

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  • I think the key point of this answer is not the bolded section. The key reason why this is the correct answer is thus quicker to download Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:26
  • @GreenAsJade Good point, well made, answer updated. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:29
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It is stripped of all unnecessary parts (spaces, newlines, comments) resulting in a smaller file.

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It loads usually faster because minified CSS/JS file is simply smaller in size, so it takes less to download and process.

See here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minification_(programming)

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    what makes it smaller in size?
    – Ihsahs
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:14
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    I actually think this is a decent question. Does it take less time to parse? Or just less time to download? Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:14
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    "what makes it smaller in size?" Did you compare a minified file to one that isn't before asking?
    – Popnoodles
    Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:19
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    both. you got less data to load and then less data to work on (like less white spaces, newlines, no comments) Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:19
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    I imagine that there probably is a marginal improvement in parse time, but I suspect that the amount of time saved ignoring whitespace and comments is generally insignificant in comparison to the saving on download time. IMO Stripping such things is probably not expensive. However - I have no numbers to back this up and so would be interested to hear a counter argument. Commented Jan 3, 2014 at 11:27

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