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Can you please tell me the difference between JUMP IF ABOVE AND JUMP IF GREATER in Assembly language? when do i use each of them? do they give me different results?

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As Intel's manual explains, JG interprets the flags as though the comparison was signed, and JA interprets the flags as though the comparison was unsigned (of course if the operation that set the flags was not a comparison or subtraction, that may not make sense). So yes, they're different. To be precise,

  • ja jumps if CF = 0 and ZF = 0 (unsigned Above: no carry and not equal)
  • jg jumps if SF = OF and ZF = 0 (signed Greater, excluding equal)

For example,

cmp eax, edx
ja somewhere ; will go "somewhere" if eax >u edx
             ; where >u is "unsigned greater than"

cmp eax, edx
jg somewhere ; will go "somewhere" if eax >s edx
             ; where >s is "signed greater than"

>u and >s agree for values with the top bit zero, but values with the top bit set are treated as negative by >s and as big by >u (of course if both operands have the top bit set, >u and >s agree again).

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  • Could you give me an example please? does that mean JA ignores the negative sign? – user3157687 Jan 3 '14 at 15:16
  • @user3157687 there is no sign. There are only condition flags. ja ignores the sign flag (SF) though. Example incoming.. – harold Jan 3 '14 at 15:17
  • sorry but what do you mean by u, s ?:) – user3157687 Jan 3 '14 at 15:21
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    @user3157687 unsigned and signed – harold Jan 3 '14 at 15:23
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    @user3157687 no, if you have cmp 5, -6 \ ja somewhere (ignore the syntax error), it will not jump (in that you are right), but the reason is that -6 (aka 0xfffffffa) is much bigger than 5, not that 6 is bigger than 5. cmp 5, -1 wouldn't jump either, -1 is even bigger than -6. "Unsigned bigger", of course. – harold Jan 3 '14 at 15:30
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JA is used for jumping if the last "flag changing" instruction was on unsigned numbers. but on the other hand, JG is used for jumping if the last "flag changing" instruction was on signed numbers.

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