6

I've seen this question on SO but it doesn't answer my question because I want to remove all instances of a value that is also a duplicate.

For example if I have a list with these values: A, A, C, D, B, A, E, E

I want to write some logic where the new list has these values: C, D, B.

Because A and E are classed as duplicates I want to remove them completely.

So with that in mind this is my code:

// List having duplicate string elements.
List<string> list = new List<string>();
list.Add("A");
list.Add("A");
list.Add("C");
list.Add("D");
list.Add("B");
list.Add("A");
list.Add("E");
list.Add("E");

// Get distinct elements.
var distinct = (from item in list orderby item select item).Distinct();

foreach (string value in distinct)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Distinct : {0}", value);
}

And this is the output:

A, B, C, D, E

2
  • @GrantWinney yeah - thanks just realised! – geedubb Jan 3 '14 at 15:29
  • 1
    Edited my question because you guys are a bit pedantic :( – nick gowdy Jan 3 '14 at 15:40
9

This should do it (C should be in the the list too, it only appears once in the code example)

var distinct = list.GroupBy(x=>x).Where(y=>y.Count()==1).Select(z=>z.Key);
6
  • 2
    Right, but you should use a Select clause to select the actual value; otherwise, distinct is a sequence of IGroupings. – sloth Jan 3 '14 at 15:19
  • @DominicKexel Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question. Why add SELECT to the query? I was going to mark this as correct then I saw your comment. I did CeeTee's code then I added select clause both times when it hits my breakpoint it looks the same. – nick gowdy Jan 3 '14 at 15:25
  • The select makes the query return an IEnumerable<string> - without it the return type is IEnumerable<IGrouping<string, string>>. I updated my answer based on @DominicKexel's comment – Original10 Jan 3 '14 at 15:27
  • 1
    This answer is correct know. The problem was that GroupBy returns a sequence of IGroupings, representing groups where the key of each group is the letter and each group contains all occurences of its letter, e.g. [A->A,A,A], [B->B] etc. Then these groups get filtered, but you're only intereset in the key of each group, not the group itself. – sloth Jan 3 '14 at 15:28
  • @DominicKexel Ok I think I understand. Thanks for the explanation :) – nick gowdy Jan 3 '14 at 15:30
4

Then this will return only non-duplicates:

var filtered = list.Where(item => list.Count(x => x == item) < 2);
3
  • 1
    This is correct. Also is it more efficient than the chosen answer? – geedubb Jan 3 '14 at 15:38
  • 2
    @geedubb This is dramatically less efficient. It's iterating the entire list N+1 times, whereas the accepted answer iterates it once. – Servy Jan 3 '14 at 15:52
  • 1
    True. If you have a large dataset, this will be a lot less efficient. For a small list though, I might have used this just because it is more straight forward to read and understand. – Kjartan Jan 3 '14 at 15:56
1

You can group by each letter, then grab the ones that only occur once.

var singleInstances = list.GroupBy(x => x)
                          .Where(x => x.Count() == 1)
                          .Select(x => x.Key)
                          .ToList();

Output:

C
D
B
1

You could group the items and then select an item from each group that has exactly one item in the group:

var filteredList = list.GroupBy(x => x).Where(grp => grp.Count() == 1).Select(grp => grp.Key);
1

Try this

var duplicates = list.GroupBy(x => x)
                         .Where(g => g.Count() == 1)
                         .Select(g => g.Key)
                         .ToList();

That will return all of the duplicates.

3
  • 1
    Should be == 1, not > 1 – sloth Jan 3 '14 at 15:22
  • Yes - that's better ;) – geedubb Jan 3 '14 at 15:43
  • Hehe wrote it in a rush! – Matt Webber Jan 3 '14 at 15:43
0
   List<string> list = new List<string>();
                            list.Add("A");
                            list.Add("A");
                            list.Add("C");
                            list.Add("D");
                            list.Add("B");
                            list.Add("A");
                            list.Add("E");
                            list.Add("E");

            var distinct = from item in list
                           group item by item into x
                           where x.Count().Equals(1)
                           select x;
0
List<string> list = new List<string>();
                        list.Add("A");
                        list.Add("A");
                        list.Add("C");
                        list.Add("D");
                        list.Add("B");
                        list.Add("A");
                        list.Add("E");
                        list.Add("E");

var query = list.Except(list.GroupBy(x => x).Where(g => g.Count() > 1).Select(g => g.Key));
1
  • Why do the extra work of the except instead of just filtering out the groups with a count of 1 to begin with, like every other answer here? – Servy Jan 3 '14 at 15:59

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