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How do I use the @Size annotation for MySQL DECIMAL(x,y) columns?

I'm using BigDecimal, but when I try to include the @Size max it doesn't work. Here is my code:

@Size(max = 7,2)
@Column(name = "weight")
private BigDecimal weight;

3 Answers 3

28

You could use the Hibernate Validator directly, and annotate your field with @Digits like so:

@Digits(integer=5, fraction=2)
@Column(name = "weight")
private BigDecimal weight;
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17

See this answer

@Column(nullable= false, precision=7, scale=2)    // Creates the database field with this size.
@Digits(integer=9, fraction=2)                    // Validates data when used as a form
private BigDecimal myField;
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  • 1
    I think it should be @Column(nullable= false, precision=9, scale=2) and @Digits(integer=7, fraction=2)
    – Tony Wen
    Nov 10, 2020 at 2:11
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@Column(columnDefinition = "DECIMAL(7,2)")

If you're asking how you should validate, you should use the @Min and @Max annotations or the @DecimalMin and @DecimalMax annotations.

@Size is an annotation used to validate a property, not to define its column. @Size is typically used to assure that a string or a collection is of a certain size.

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  • So how would I use @Max to validate a BigDecimal with 7,2?
    – ThreaT
    Jan 3, 2014 at 16:20
  • @Threat when you say 'validate a BigDecimal with 7,2' ... can you clarify that a bit? When I read that I assume you're speaking about a BigDecimal with a specific scale and precision, which is different from a min and max value.
    – zmf
    Jan 3, 2014 at 16:32
  • In other words, my BigDecimal must conform to, for example, 9999999,99 maximum. The same way that MySQL would validate it as far as I understand.
    – ThreaT
    Jan 3, 2014 at 16:35
  • @ThreaT, DECIMAL(7,2) means a total of 7 digits, 2 of which are after the decimal point. So the maximum value that it can hold is 99999,99 Jan 3, 2014 at 16:37
  • It is throwing me SQL Error: 0, SQLState: 22003, ERROR: numeric field overflow. source is BigDecimal field. I tried to put over @Column(columnDefinition = "DECIMAL(8,8)"), so there is something more I need to discover.
    – kensai
    Jan 30, 2018 at 17:00

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