2

I am trying to write an event-driven simulation in C++. Right now it's just a bare-bones priority queue of unique_ptrs to base Event class:

class Event
{
public:
    double time;
    Event(double time);
    virtual void handle() = 0;
};

struct EventCompare
{
    bool operator()(std::unique_ptr<Event> e1, std::unique_ptr<Event> e2) {
    return e1->time > e2->time;
    }
};

class DumpSimulationEvent : public Event
{
public:
    DumpSimulationEvent(const double time);
    void handle();
};

typedef std::priority_queue<std::unique_ptr<Event>, std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Event>>, EventCompare> EventQueue;

class Simulation
{
    double time;
    EventQueue eventQueue;
public:
    Simulation();
    void run();
};

Event::Event(const double t)
{
    time = t;
}

DumpSimulationEvent::DumpSimulationEvent(const double t) : Event(t)
{
}

void DumpSimulationEvent::handle()
{
    std::cout << "Event time: " << time;
}

Simulation::Simulation()
{
    time = 0;
    eventQueue = EventQueue();
    std::unique_ptr<DumpSimulationEvent> dumpEvent5(new DumpSimulationEvent(5));
  //eventQueue.emplace(dumpEvent5);
}

void Simulation::run()
{
    while (!eventQueue.empty()) {
        std::unique_ptr<Event> currentEvent = std::move(eventQueue.top());
      //eventQueue.pop();
        time += currentEvent->time;
        currentEvent->handle();
    }
}

Main function (not shown above) just creates an instance of Simulation and calls the run() method. Problem is that uncommenting either emplace() or pop() results in

error C2280: 'std::unique_ptr<Event,std::default_delete<_Ty>>::unique_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Ty,std::default_delete<_Ty>> &)' : attempting to reference a deleted function  c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 12.0\vc\include\xutility 521 1

Research indicates that most likely cause is an attempt to copy an unique_ptr. I am, however, at loss whether is it actual reason and does it actually happen at commented lines or just becomes visible there. Adding std::move to emplace argument doesn't seem to help.

  • 3
    std::move(eventQueue.top()); this will fail, as priority_queue only provides const access to top. See stackoverflow.com/q/20149471/420683 – dyp Jan 3 '14 at 16:32
  • Not the cause of the error you're seeing, but the Event class should have a virtual destructor, otherwise it's UB to stick DumpSimulationEvent objects into unique_ptr<Event> – Praetorian Jan 3 '14 at 16:47
  • Does defining virtual destructor means I'll have to explicitly define destructors and move constructors for derived classes? – user3157796 Jan 3 '14 at 17:00
4

Your problem is that you are not moving things correctly, but you are trying to make copies in several places.

Here is a diff that makes your code work, with some commentary:

 struct EventCompare
 {
-    bool operator()(std::unique_ptr<Event> e1, std::unique_ptr<Event> e2) {
+    bool operator()(std::unique_ptr<Event> const &e1, std::unique_ptr<Event> const &e2) {
     return e1->time > e2->time;
     }
 };

Here, as juanchopanza mentioned in his answer, you have to take std::unique_ptrs by reference, not by value, otherwise you are asking the compiler to make copies for you, which is not allowed.

     time = 0;
     eventQueue = EventQueue();
     std::unique_ptr<DumpSimulationEvent> dumpEvent5(new DumpSimulationEvent(5));
-  //eventQueue.emplace(dumpEvent5);
+    eventQueue.emplace(std::move(dumpEvent5));
 }

In the above code, you have to MOVE your std::unique_ptr into the queue. Emplace doesn't magically move things, it just forwards arguments to the constructor. Without std::move here, you are asking to make a copy. You could have also just written: eventQueue.emplace(new DumpSimulationEvent(5)); and skipped the intermediate object.

     while (!eventQueue.empty()) {
-        std::unique_ptr<Event> currentEvent = std::move(eventQueue.top());
-      //eventQueue.pop();
+        std::unique_ptr<Event> currentEvent(std::move(const_cast<std::unique_ptr<Event>&>(eventQueu
+        eventQueue.pop();
         time += currentEvent->time;
         currentEvent->handle();

Finally, in the above code, you are trying to move from eventQueue.top(), but you can't move from a const reference, which is what top() returns. If you want to force the move to work, you have to use both const_cast and std::move() as shown above.

Here is the complete modified code which compiles fine here with g++-4.8 -std=c++11:

#include <memory>
#include <queue>
#include <iostream>

class Event
{
public:
    double time;
    Event(double time);
    virtual void handle() = 0;
};

struct EventCompare
{
    bool operator()(std::unique_ptr<Event> const &e1, std::unique_ptr<Event> const &e2) {
    return e1->time > e2->time;
    }
};

class DumpSimulationEvent : public Event
{
public:
    DumpSimulationEvent(const double time);
    void handle();
};

typedef std::priority_queue<std::unique_ptr<Event>, std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Event>>, EventCompare> EventQueue;

class Simulation
{
    double time;
    EventQueue eventQueue;
public:
    Simulation();
    void run();
};

Event::Event(const double t)
{
    time = t;
}

DumpSimulationEvent::DumpSimulationEvent(const double t) : Event(t)
{
}

void DumpSimulationEvent::handle()
{
    std::cout << "Event time: " << time;
}

Simulation::Simulation()
{
    time = 0;
    eventQueue = EventQueue();
    std::unique_ptr<DumpSimulationEvent> dumpEvent5(new DumpSimulationEvent(5));
    eventQueue.emplace(std::move(dumpEvent5));
}

void Simulation::run()
{
    while (!eventQueue.empty()) {
        std::unique_ptr<Event> currentEvent(std::move(const_cast<std::unique_ptr<Event>&>(eventQueue.top())));
        eventQueue.pop();
        time += currentEvent->time;
        currentEvent->handle();
    }
}
  • Thanks, it worked. Interestingly, it worked without the top() const_reference return workaround. I assume problem will show itself when there will be many events going in or out of queue? – user3157796 Jan 3 '14 at 17:03
  • @user3157796 Are you saying you got it to compile while moving from a const reference? If so, that's probably a compiler or library bug, as a const std::unique_ptr is defined to be immovable. Anyway, keeping the const_cast is (or should be) necessary, but you can use operator= instead of the constructor to do the moving. (I changed it to the constructor when I edited the code, but that wasn't strictly necessary). – wjl Jan 3 '14 at 17:10
  • Yes, it worked with just adding std::move to emplace and changing comparator to references as per juanchopanza (his answer is gone for some reason), while keeping std::move(eventQueue.top()) as is. Compiler in question is MSVC 18.00.21005.1. cplusplus.com/reference/queue/priority_queue/top shows const_reference as return type for C++11 as opposed to const value_type&. Maybe it's a wrapper that can handle move? – user3157796 Jan 3 '14 at 17:30
  • @user3157796 Well, even it were a wrapper, it would still be buggy if it exposed a non-const std::unique_ptr && on conversion. I suspect that MSVC's std::unique_ptr implementation is just being too lenient compared to the standard, which is still a bug, just not one that is causing you any trouble at the moment. I'd keep the const_cast for portability, but it's up to you! =) – wjl Jan 3 '14 at 17:38
  • A-a-and as soon as I add more events to queue, I get access violation in comparator. :( – user3157796 Jan 3 '14 at 17:38

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