345

I want to do something like this :

myYear = record.GetValueOrNull<int?>("myYear"),

Notice the nullable type as the generic parameter.

Since the GetValueOrNull function could return null my first attempt was this:

public static T GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
  where T : class
{
    object columnValue = reader[columnName];

    if (!(columnValue is DBNull))
    {
        return (T)columnValue;
    }
    return null;
}

But the error I'm getting now is:

The type 'int?' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method

Right! Nullable<int> is a struct! So I tried changing the class constraint to a struct constraint (and as a side effect can't return null any more):

public static T GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
  where T : struct

Now the assignment:

myYear = record.GetValueOrNull<int?>("myYear");

Gives the following error:

The type 'int?' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method

Is specifying a nullable type as a generic parameter at all possible?

1
  • 3
    Pls pls make your signature IDataRecord from DbDataRecord..
    – nawfal
    Feb 7, 2013 at 5:56

13 Answers 13

294

Change the return type to Nullable<T>, and call the method with the non nullable parameter

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int? i = GetValueOrNull<int>(null, string.Empty);
}


public static Nullable<T> GetValueOrNull<T>(DbDataRecord reader, string columnName) where T : struct
{
    object columnValue = reader[columnName];

    if (!(columnValue is DBNull))
        return (T)columnValue;

    return null;
}
9
  • 2
    I suggest you use "columnValue == DBNull.Value" instead of the 'is' operator, because its slightly faster =)
    – driAn
    Mar 26, 2009 at 21:33
  • 50
    Personal preference, but you can use the short form T? instead of Nullable<T>
    – Dunc
    Sep 9, 2010 at 15:04
  • 11
    This is fine for value types, but then I think it won't work at all with reference types (e.g. GetValueOrNull<string>) because C# doesn't seem to like Nullable<(ref type)> like "string?". Robert C Barth & James Jones's solutions, below, seem much better to me if that's your need.
    – bacar
    Jul 28, 2011 at 10:43
  • 2
    @bacar - right, hence the "where T : struct", if you want reference types you can create a similar method with "where T: class"
    – Greg Dean
    Aug 15, 2011 at 23:30
  • 4
    @Greg - sure, but then you need a second method, and you can't overload the name. As I say, if you want to handle both val and ref types, I think cleaner solutions are presented on this page.
    – bacar
    Aug 17, 2011 at 7:55
123
public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this IDataRecord rdr, int index)
{
    object val = rdr[index];

    if (!(val is DBNull))
        return (T)val;

    return default(T);
}

Just use it like this:

decimal? Quantity = rdr.GetValueOrDefault<decimal?>(1);
string Unit = rdr.GetValueOrDefault<string>(2);
6
  • 7
    This could be shortened to: return rdr.IsDBNull(index) ? default(T) : (T)rdr[index];
    – Foole
    Nov 9, 2011 at 4:33
  • 16
    I think this question explicitly wants null, not default(T).
    – mafu
    Feb 16, 2014 at 18:24
  • 7
    @mafu default(T) will return null for reference types, and 0 for numerical types, making the solution more flexible. Mar 15, 2014 at 19:52
  • 2
    I think it's clearer to either call this GetValueOrDefault to clarify that it returns default(T) rather than null. Alternatively, you could have it throw an exception if T is not nullable.
    – Sam
    Jul 14, 2014 at 0:36
  • This method has a lot of advantages, and forces you to think about returning something other than null as well. Jun 25, 2018 at 17:45
67

Just do two things to your original code – remove the where constraint, and change the last return from return null to return default(T). This way you can return whatever type you want.

By the way, you can avoid the use of is by changing your if statement to if (columnValue != DBNull.Value).

3
  • 9
    This solution does not work, as there is a logical difference between NULL and 0
    – Greg Dean
    Oct 17, 2008 at 11:53
  • 18
    It works if the type he passes is int?. It will return NULL, just like he wants. If he passes int as the type, it will return 0 since an int can't be NULL. Besides the fact that I tried it and it works perfectly. Oct 23, 2008 at 0:20
  • 2
    This is the most correct and flexible answer. However, return default is sufficient (you don't need the (T), the compiler will infer it from the signature return type).
    – McGuireV10
    Jan 19, 2018 at 12:58
7

Disclaimer: This answer works, but is intended for educational purposes only. :) James Jones' solution is probably the best here and certainly the one I'd go with.

C# 4.0's dynamic keyword makes this even easier, if less safe:

public static dynamic GetNullableValue(this IDataRecord record, string columnName)
{
  var val = reader[columnName];

  return (val == DBNull.Value ? null : val);
}

Now you don't need the explicit type hinting on the RHS:

int? value = myDataReader.GetNullableValue("MyColumnName");

In fact, you don't need it anywhere!

var value = myDataReader.GetNullableValue("MyColumnName");

value will now be an int, or a string, or whatever type was returned from the DB.

The only problem is that this does not prevent you from using non-nullable types on the LHS, in which case you'll get a rather nasty runtime exception like:

Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder.RuntimeBinderException: Cannot convert null to 'int' because it is a non-nullable value type

As with all code that uses dynamic: caveat coder.

1
  • 2
    I'd avoid dynamic types in this case as they are not necessary. Dynamic types have a significant performance overhead.
    – Dave Black
    Mar 4 at 21:19
6

I think you want to handle Reference types and struct types. I use it to convert XML Element strings to a more typed type. You can remove the nullAlternative with reflection. The formatprovider is to handle the culture dependent '.' or ',' separator in e.g. decimals or ints and doubles. This may work:

public T GetValueOrNull<T>(string strElementNameToSearchFor, IFormatProvider provider = null ) 
    {
        IFormatProvider theProvider = provider == null ? Provider : provider;
        XElement elm = GetUniqueXElement(strElementNameToSearchFor);

        if (elm == null)
        {
            object o =  Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
            return (T)o; 
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                Type type = typeof(T);
                if (type.IsGenericType &&
                type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>).GetGenericTypeDefinition())
                {
                    type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
                }
                return (T)Convert.ChangeType(elm.Value, type, theProvider); 
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                object o = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
                return (T)o; 
            }
        }
    }

You can use it like this:

iRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<int?>("top_overrun_length");
Assert.AreEqual(100, iRes);



decimal? dRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<decimal?>("top_overrun_bend_degrees");
Assert.AreEqual(new Decimal(10.1), dRes);

String strRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<String>("top_overrun_bend_degrees");
Assert.AreEqual("10.1", strRes);
5

Multiple generic constraints can't be combined in an OR fashion (less restrictive), only in an AND fashion (more restrictive). Meaning that one method can't handle both scenarios. The generic constraints also cannot be used to make a unique signature for the method, so you'd have to use 2 separate method names.

However, you can use the generic constraints to make sure that the methods are used correctly.

In my case, I specifically wanted null to be returned, and never the default value of any possible value types. GetValueOrDefault = bad. GetValueOrNull = good.

I used the words "Null" and "Nullable" to distinguish between reference types and value types. And here is an example of a couple extension methods I wrote that compliments the FirstOrDefault method in System.Linq.Enumerable class.

    public static TSource FirstOrNull<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
        where TSource: class
    {
        if (source == null) return null;
        var result = source.FirstOrDefault();   // Default for a class is null
        return result;
    }

    public static TSource? FirstOrNullable<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource?> source)
        where TSource : struct
    {
        if (source == null) return null;
        var result = source.FirstOrDefault();   // Default for a nullable is null
        return result;
    }
4

Just had to do something incredible similar to this. My code:

public T IsNull<T>(this object value, T nullAlterative)
{
    if(value != DBNull.Value)
    {
        Type type = typeof(T);
        if (type.IsGenericType && 
            type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>).GetGenericTypeDefinition())
        {
            type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
        }

        return (T)(type.IsEnum ? Enum.ToObject(type, Convert.ToInt32(value)) :
            Convert.ChangeType(value, type));
    }
    else 
        return nullAlternative;
}
4

Incase it helps someone - I have used this before and seems to do what I need it to...

public static bool HasValueAndIsNotDefault<T>(this T? v)
    where T : struct
{
    return v.HasValue && !v.Value.Equals(default(T));
}
3

This may be a dead thread, but I tend to use the following:

public static T? GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
where T : struct 
{
    return reader[columnName] as T?;
}
1
  • 2
    "The type 'T' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Nullable<T>'" Mar 8, 2017 at 0:34
3

The shorter way :

public static T ValueOrDefault<T>(this DataRow reader, string columnName) => 
        reader.IsNull(columnName) ? default : (T) reader[columnName];

return 0 for int, and null for int?

2

I just encountered the same problem myself.

... = reader["myYear"] as int?; works and is clean.

It works with any type without an issue. If the result is DBNull, it returns null as the conversion fails.

1
  • In fact, you could probably do int v=reader["myYear"]??-1; or some other default instead of -1. However, this might bring up issues if the value is DBNull...
    – nurchi
    Nov 27, 2017 at 17:43
2

I know this is old, but here is another solution:

public static bool GetValueOrDefault<T>(this SqlDataReader Reader, string ColumnName, out T Result)
{
    try
    {
        object ColumnValue = Reader[ColumnName];

        Result = (ColumnValue!=null && ColumnValue != DBNull.Value) ? (T)ColumnValue : default(T);

        return ColumnValue!=null && ColumnValue != DBNull.Value;
    }
    catch
    {
        // Possibly an invalid cast?
        return false;
    }
}

Now, you don't care if T was value or reference type. Only if the function returns true, you have a reasonable value from the database. Usage:

...
decimal Quantity;
if (rdr.GetValueOrDefault<decimal>("YourColumnName", out Quantity))
{
    // Do something with Quantity
}

This approach is very similar to int.TryParse("123", out MyInt);

2
  • It would be good if you worked on your naming conventions. They lack consistency. In one place there is a variable without a capital then there is one with. The same with parameters to the methods. Nov 25, 2017 at 4:38
  • 1
    Done and done! Hope code looks better now. Bob's your auntie :) All is skookum
    – nurchi
    Nov 27, 2017 at 17:40
0

Here is an extension method I've used for years:

public static T GetValue<T>(this DbDataReader reader, string columnName)
{
    if (reader == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(reader));
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(columnName))
        throw new ArgumentException("Value cannot be null or whitespace.", nameof(columnName));

    // do not swallow exceptions here - let them bubble up to the calling API to be handled and/or logged
    var index = reader.GetOrdinal(columnName);
    if (!reader.IsDBNull(index))
    {
        return (T)reader.GetValue(index);
    }
    return default;
}

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