107

Is it possible to fix the height of a row (tr) on a table?

The problem appears when I shrink the window of the browser, some rows start playing around, and I can not fix the height of the row.

I tried several ways: tr width="20" / tr style="height:20px" / td height="20" / td style="height:20px"

I am using IE7

Style

.tableContainer{
    color:#0076BF;
    margin: -10px 0px -10px 0px;
    border-spacing: 10px;
    empty-cells:show;
    width:90%;
    text-align:left;
} 

.tableContainer tr td{
    white-space:nowrap;
    text-align:left;
}

HTML code.

<table class="tableContainer" cellspacing="10px">
    <tr style="height:15px;">
        <td>NHS Number</td>
        <td>&#160;</td>
        <td>Date of Visit</td>
        <td>&#160;</td>
        <td colspan="3">Care Time Started</td>
        <td>&#160;</td>
        <td rowspan="2" style="text-align:right;vertical-align:bottom;">&#9745;</td>
        <td rowspan="2" style="font-weight:bold;vertical-align:bottom;">Tick when<br/>                        care starts</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td width="90" class="tableContainerRow2">&#160;</td>
        <td >&#160;</td>
        <td width="80" class="tableContainerRow2">&#160;</td>
        <td >&#160;</td>
        <td width="40" class="tableContainerRow2">&#160;</td>
        <td  width="5">:</td>
        <td width="40" class="tableContainerRow2">&#160;</td>        
        <td >&#160;</td>
    </tr>
</table>
103

Tables are iffy (at least, in IE) when it comes to fixing heights and not wrapping text. I think you'll find that the only solution is to put the text inside a div element, like so:

td.container > div {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    overflow:hidden;
}
td.container {
    height: 20px;
}
<table>
    <tr>
        <td class="container">
            <div>This is a long line of text designed not to wrap 
                 when the container becomes too small.</div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

This way, the div's height is that of the containing cell and the text cannot grow the div, keeping the cell/row the same height no matter what the window size is.

6
  • 1
    Thanks for the advise, It seems to work, but it looks a bit messy though. – Amra Jan 19 '10 at 11:10
  • Happy to help :-) Unfortunately, messy code is usually the case in hacks and workarounds. – Andy E Jan 19 '10 at 11:24
  • I use [code].container { width: 100%; max-height: 40px; overflow:hidden; }[/code] and [code]<div class='container'></div>[/code]. – Cees Timmerman Jul 4 '12 at 12:08
  • I've did the same method, putting a div inside a <th> tag and it worked well. I had this issue only on Chrome. FFox, Safari and IE supported well the height set on the table header. Thanks for sharing! :) – Mário Rodrigues Jan 16 '13 at 9:30
  • doesn't work in safari... you need to set the actual height and width on the div as well, not only the td – Radu Simionescu Aug 3 '15 at 10:56
16

Try putting the height into one of the cells, like this:

<table class="tableContainer" cellspacing="10px">
 <tr>
  <td style="height:15px;">NHS Number</td>
  <td>&#160;</td>

Note however, that you won't be able to make the cell smaller than the content requires it to be. In that case you would have to make the text smaller first.

2
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure you don't use "px" in html attributes. – unflores May 9 '16 at 14:17
  • 10
    I'm pretty sure you can use in style attribute. – Burak Dobur Nov 16 '16 at 13:03
11

Setting the td height to less than the natural height of its content

Since table cells want to be at least big enough to encase their content, if the content has no apparent height, the cells can be arbitrarily resized.

By resizing the cells, we can control the row height.

One way to do this, is to set the content with an absolute position within the relative cell, and set the height of the cell, and the left and top of the content.

table {
  width: 100%;
}
td {
  border: 1px solid #999;
}
.set-height td {
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
  height: 3em;
}
.set-height p {
  position: absolute;
  margin: 0;
  top: 0;
}
/* table layout fixed */
.layout-fixed {
  table-layout: fixed;
}
/* td width */
.td-width td:first-child {
  width: 33%;
}
<table><tbody>
  <tr class="set-height">
    <td><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p></td>
    <td>Foo</td></tr><tr><td>Bar</td><td>Baz</td></tr><tr><td>Qux</td>
    <td>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</td>
  </tr>
</tbody></table>
<h3>With <code>table-layout: fixed</code> applied:</h3>
<table class="layout-fixed"><tbody>
  <tr class="set-height">
    <td><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p></td>
    <td>Foo</td></tr><tr><td>Bar</td><td>Baz</td></tr><tr><td>Qux</td>
    <td>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</td>
  </tr>
</tbody></table>
<h3>With <code>&lt;td&gt; width</code> applied:</h3>
<table class="td-width"><tbody>
  <tr class="set-height">
    <td><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p></td>
    <td>Foo</td></tr><tr><td>Bar</td><td>Baz</td></tr><tr><td>Qux</td>
    <td>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</td>
  </tr>
</tbody></table>

The table-layout property

The second table in the snippet above has table-layout: fixed applied, which causes cells to be given equal width, regardless of their content, within the parent.

According to caniuse.com, there are no significant compatibility issues regarding the use of table-layout as of Sept 12, 2019.

Or simply apply width to specific cells as in the third table.

These methods allow the cell containing the effectively sizeless content created by applying position: absolute to be given some arbitrary girth.

Much more simply...

I really should have thought of this from the start; we can manipulate block level table cell content in all the usual ways, and without completely destroying the content's natural size with position: absolute, we can leave the table to figure out what the width should be.

table {
  width: 100%;
}
td {
  border: 1px solid #999;
}
table p {
  margin: 0;
}
.cap-height p {
  max-height: 3em;
  overflow: hidden;
}
<table><tbody>
  <tr class="cap-height">
    <td><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p></td>
    <td>Foo</td>
  </tr>
  <tr class="cap-height">
    <td><p>Bar</p></td>
    <td>Baz</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Qux</td>
    <td><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</p></td>
  </tr>
</tbody></table>

6
  • Finally an answer that looks promising! Gotta try it as soon as I will be at work, I will give feedback if I don't forget. – jeromej Nov 20 '15 at 15:19
  • 1
    Worked like a charm! (Warning that it does remove text-align: center and other centering tricks though… as it relies on position: absolute) – jeromej Nov 20 '15 at 20:27
  • This works for the height in my case, but when using postion: absolute, I lose the automatic cell width. Trying to find a way to have the table still properly calculate cell width while taking control over row height. Any thoughts? – ash Sep 11 '19 at 21:09
  • @ash - I'm not immediately thinking of any way to keep the fully automatic width after effectively destroying the content's size, but we can force the table cells to be arbitrarily wide. I have expanded the example snippet to show one method that might help you out. I will give it some more thought, and add more details if anything useful comes to mind :) – Fred Gandt Sep 12 '19 at 20:08
  • Thanks Fred. Note that I could have headers (<th>) to give a fixed size to the columns, but then I am concerned the headers might be too narrow or too wide. – ash Sep 12 '19 at 20:47
8

Putting div inside a td made it work for me.

<table width="100%">
    <tr><td><div style="font-size:2px; height:2px; vertical-align:middle;">&nbsp;</div></td></tr>
0
2

Your table width is 90% which is relative to it's container.

If you squeeze the page, you are probably squeezing the table width as well. The width of the cells reduce too and the browser compensate by increasing the height.

To have the height untouched, you have to make sure the widths of the cells can hold the intented content. Fixing the table width is probably something you want to try. Or perhaps play around with the min-width of the table.

0
1

I had to do this to get the result that I wanted:

<td style="font-size:3px; float:left; height:5px; vertical-align:middle;" colspan="7"><div style="font-size:3px; height:5px; vertical-align:middle;"><b><hr></b></div></td>

It refused to work with only the cell or the div and needed both.

-5

That is because the words are wrapping and are going on new lines hence stretching the TR. This should fix your problem:

overflow:hidden;

Put that in the TR styles Although it should work, why not just let it stretch o0

PS. i aint tested it so dont hate XD

1

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