2

I'm searching for the biggest number meeting some condition, out of the set of numbers that are the product of all three-digit numbers.

The straightforward way is this:

(apply max (filter 
            my-test? 
            (for [x (range 100 1000)
                  y (range x 1000)]
              (* x y))))

But this involves calculating half of all 900*900 products. If I find, e.g., (* 380 455) matches my my-test? predicate, I don't need to search any products where either factor is less than 380. Of course, I will also want to search the list from the biggest to the smallest if I'm doing this.

In psuedo-Clojure, I want to say something like this:

(for [x (range 999 99 -1) :while (>= x P)
      y (range x 99 -1) :while (>= y P)]
  (* x y))

where P is something I magically set to (min x y) each time I find a match.

Is there a way to do this in Clojure?

(I realize I could search the numbers in a diagonal fashion, given this specific problem I've set up. However, I'm now trying to solve for the general case of figuring out how to tell the for-loop that some its branches need pruned.)

  • From the question and the constraints on the for variables I infer that you are trying to solve Project Euler's #4, in which case you want your for to return a single result. In this case, why use for (which is not a "for" loop but a list comprehension, meant to return a list) over loop/recur ? – omiel Jan 5 '14 at 0:45
  • The right answer is not necessarily the first one I hit. Although as an exercise for myself I'm going to give loop/recur a try. – Dan Jameson Jan 5 '14 at 1:07
  • @omiel is right, this is a much much better way of doing it. Here is the way that gives a list of candidates that I then need to get the (max) of: (loop [x 999 y 999 min 99 candidates []] (cond (<= x min) candidates (<= y min) (recur (dec x) 999 min candidates) (my-test? (* x y)) (recur x (dec y) (max min y) (conj candidates (* x y))) true (recur x (dec y) min candidates) )) – Dan Jameson Jan 5 '14 at 1:21
  • You should add that as an answer. Also, it's idiomatic to use :else as the catch-all for cond. – Shepmaster Jan 5 '14 at 2:19
  • 1
    If I find, e.g., (* 380 455) matches my my-test? predicate, I don't need to search any products where either factor is less than 380 - this seems completely wrong, if your goal is to find the largest product of two numbers satisfying some predicate. eg, (* 379 999) is still larger than (* 380 455). All you can really do is skip pairs where both multiplicands are less than 380, in this example. – amalloy Jan 5 '14 at 2:30
5

@omeil suggested a loop/recur process, and this works much better. for loops just aren't built for this.

(loop [x 999 y 999 min 99 candidates []]
    (cond (<= x min)          candidates ; exit condition
          (<= y min)          (recur (dec x) 999 min candidates) ; step x
          (my-test? (* x y)) (recur x (dec y) (max min y) (conj candidates (* x y)))
          :else               (recur x (dec y) min candidates) ; step y
     ))
1

A very ugly solution would be to use an atom:

(let [P (atom 0)]
  (for [x (range 999 99 -1) :while (>= x @P)
        y (range x 99 -1)   :while (>= y @P)]
    (do
      (reset! P (+ x y))
      (* x y))))

One thing that I think will get in the way is that the for loop doesn't really care what the "output" is, so I am unable to see how it would be able to get that information natively.

The "right" solution is probably a recursive one that allows you to pass in (a.k.a. update) your minimum as you know more.

  • This is close to what I had come up with just about a minute after your answer. I needed to put in a :when (my-test? (* x y)) to the first argument of the for-loop so that P only gets reset on successful matches. I agree it doesn't feel very "Clojure-y". – Dan Jameson Jan 4 '14 at 23:06

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