64

When I run my code, Node.js throw "RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded" exception caused by too much recursion calls. I tried to increase Node.js stack-size by sudo node --stack-size=16000 app, but Node.js crash without any error message. When I run this again without sudo, then Node.js print 'Segmentation fault: 11'. Is there a possibility to solve this without removing recursion call?

Thanks

  • 3
    Why do you need such deep recursion in the first place? – Dan Abramov Jan 5 '14 at 22:36
  • Please, can you post some code? Segmentation fault: 11 usually means a bug in node. – vkurchatkin Jan 6 '14 at 6:33
  • 1
    @Dan Abramov: Why deep recursion? This can be a problem if you wish to iterate over an array or list and perform an async operation on each (e.g. some database operation). If you use the callback from the async operation to move on to the next item, then there will be at least one extra level of recursion for each item in the list. The anti-pattern provided by heinob below stops the stack from blowing out. – Philip Callender Dec 11 '14 at 15:58
  • 1
    @PhilipCallender I didn't realize you were doing async stuff, thanks for clarification! – Dan Abramov Dec 11 '14 at 20:18
  • @DanAbramov Doesn't have to be deep either to crash. V8 doesn't get the chance to clean out stuff allocated on the stack. Functions called earlier which have long since stopped executing might have created variables on the stack which are not referenced anymore but still held in memory. If you are doing any intensive time consuming operation in a synchronous fashion and allocating variables on the stack while you're at it, you're still going to crash with the same error. I got my synchronous JSON parser to crash at a callstack depth of 9. kikobeats.com/synchronously-asynchronous – FeignMan Sep 29 '16 at 13:50
88

You should wrap your recursive function call into a

  • setTimeout,
  • setImmediate or
  • process.nextTick

function to give node.js the chance to clear the stack. If you don't do that and there are many loops without any real async function call or if you do not wait for the callback, your RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded will be inevitable.

There are many articles concerning "Potential Async Loop". Here is one.

Now some more example code:

// ANTI-PATTERN
// THIS WILL CRASH

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            // this will crash after some rounds with
            // "stack exceed", because control is never given back
            // to the browser 
            // -> no GC and browser "dead" ... "VERY BAD"
            potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});

This is right:

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            // Now the browser gets the chance to clear the stack
            // after every round by getting the control back.
            // Afterwards the loop continues
            setTimeout( function() {
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
            }, 0 );
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});

Now your loop may become too slow, because we loose a little time (one browser roundtrip) per round. But you do not have to call setTimeout in every round. Normally it is o.k. to do it every 1000th time. But this may differ depending on your stack size:

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            if( i % 1000 === 0 ) {
                setTimeout( function() {
                    potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
                }, 0 );
            } else {
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
            }
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});
  • 5
    There were some good and bad points in your answer. I really liked that you mentioned setTimeout() et al. But there is no need to use setTimeout(fn, 1), since setTimeout(fn, 0) is perfectly fine (so we don't need the setTimeout(fn, 1) every % 1000 hack). It allows the JavaScript VM to clear the stack, and immediately resume execution. In node.js the process.nextTick() is slightly better because it allows node.js to do some other stuff (I/O IIRC) also before letting your callback resume. – joonas.fi Mar 1 '14 at 10:44
  • 2
    you are right. 0 is better. fixed it. – heinob Mar 1 '14 at 11:17
  • 1
    I would say it's better to use setImmediate instead of setTimeout in these cases. – BaNz Mar 7 '14 at 11:19
  • 4
    @joonas.fi: My "hack" with %1000 is necessary. Doing a setImmediate/setTimeout (even with 0) on every loop is dramatically slower. – heinob Mar 26 '14 at 6:14
  • 3
    Care to update your in-code German comments with English translation...?:) I do understand but others might not be so lucky. – Robert Rossmann Jan 21 '15 at 10:35
20

I found a dirty solution:

/bin/bash -c "ulimit -s 65500; exec /usr/local/bin/node --stack-size=65500 /path/to/app.js"

It just increase call stack limit. I think that this is not suitable for production code, but I needed it for script that run only once.

  • 21
    I wish you good luck! – heinob Mar 1 '14 at 11:18
  • Cool trick, although personally I would suggest using correct practices to avoid mistakes and create a more well rounded solution. – indospace.io Mar 19 '18 at 17:00
5

In some languages this can be solved with tail call optimization, where the recursion call is transformed under the hood into a loop so no maximum stack size reached error exists.

But in javascript the current engines don't support this, it's foreseen for new version of the language Ecmascript 6.

Node.js has some flags to enable ES6 features but tail call is not yet available.

So you can refactor your code to implement a technique called trampolining, or refactor in order to transform recursion into a loop.

  • Thank you. My recursion call does not return value, so is there any way to call function and not wait for the result? – user1518183 Jan 5 '14 at 19:17
  • And does the function it alter some data, like an array, what does it do the function, what are the inputs/outputs? – Angular University Jan 5 '14 at 19:31
1

If you don't want to implement your own wrapper, you can use a queue system, e.g. async.queue, queue.

1

I had a similar issue as this. I had an issue with using multiple Array.map()'s in a row (around 8 maps at once) and was getting a maximum_call_stack_exceeded error. I solved this by changing the map's into 'for' loops

So if you are using alot of map calls, changing them to for loops may fix the problem

Edit

Just for clarity and probably-not-needed-but-good-to-know-info, using .map() causes the array to be prepped (resolving getters , etc) and the callback to be cached, and also internally keeps an index of the array (so the callback is provided with the correct index/value). This stacks with each nested call, and caution is advised when not nested as well, as the next .map() could be called before the first array is garbage collected (if at all).

Take this example:

var cb = *some callback function*
var arr1 , arr2 , arr3 = [*some large data set]
arr1.map(v => {
    *do something
})
cb(arr1)
arr2.map(v => {
    *do something // even though v is overwritten, and the first array
                  // has been passed through, it is still in memory
                  // because of the cached calls to the callback function
}) 

If we change this to:

for(var|let|const v in|of arr1) {
    *do something
}
cb(arr1)
for(var|let|const v in|of arr2) {
    *do something  // Here there is not callback function to 
                   // store a reference for, and the array has 
                   // already been passed of (gone out of scope)
                   // so the garbage collector has an opportunity
                   // to remove the array if it runs low on memory
}

I hope this makes some sense (I don't have the best way with words) and helps a few to prevent the head scratching I went through

If anyone is interested, here is also a performance test comparing map and for loops (not my work).

https://github.com/dg92/Performance-Analysis-JS

For loops are usually better than map, but not reduce, filter, or find

0

Regarding increasing the max stack size, on 32 bit and 64 bit machines V8's memory allocation defaults are, respectively, 700 MB and 1400 MB. In newer versions of V8, memory limits on 64 bit systems are no longer set by V8, theoretically indicating no limit. However, the OS (Operating System) on which Node is running can always limit the amount of memory V8 can take, so the true limit of any given process cannot be generally stated.

Though V8 makes available the --max_old_space_size option, which allows control over the amount of memory available to a process, accepting a value in MB. Should you need to increase memory allocation, simply pass this option the desired value when spawning a Node process.

It is often an excellent strategy to reduce the available memory allocation for a given Node instance, especially when running many instances. As with stack limits, consider whether massive memory needs are better delegated to a dedicated storage layer, such as an in-memory database or similar.

0

Please check that the function you are importing and the one that you have declared in the same file do not have the same name.

I will give you an example for this error. In express JS (using ES6), consider the following scenario:

import {getAllCall} from '../../services/calls';

let getAllCall = () => {
   return getAllCall().then(res => {
      //do something here
   })
}
module.exports = {
getAllCall
}

The above scenario will cause infamous RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded error because the function keeps calling itself so many times that it runs out of maximum call stack.

Most of the times the error is in code (like the one above). Other way of resolving is manually increasing the call stack. Well, this works for certain extreme cases, but it is not recommended.

Hope my answer helped you.

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