107

I would like to display a pandas dataframe with a given format using print() and the IPython display(). For example:

df = pd.DataFrame([123.4567, 234.5678, 345.6789, 456.7890],
                  index=['foo','bar','baz','quux'],
                  columns=['cost'])
print df

         cost
foo   123.4567
bar   234.5678
baz   345.6789
quux  456.7890

I would like to somehow coerce this into printing

         cost
foo   $123.46
bar   $234.57
baz   $345.68
quux  $456.79

without having to modify the data itself or create a copy, just change the way it is displayed.

How can I do this?

  • 2
    Is cost the only float column, or are there other float columns that should not be formatted with $? – unutbu Jan 5 '14 at 18:43
  • I'd like to do it for the cost column only (my real data has other columns) – Jason S Jan 5 '14 at 19:00
  • i realize that once $ is attached, the data type automatically changes to object. – Nguai al Jan 24 at 16:00
184
import pandas as pd
pd.options.display.float_format = '${:,.2f}'.format
df = pd.DataFrame([123.4567, 234.5678, 345.6789, 456.7890],
                  index=['foo','bar','baz','quux'],
                  columns=['cost'])
print(df)

yields

        cost
foo  $123.46
bar  $234.57
baz  $345.68
quux $456.79

but this only works if you want every float to be formatted with a dollar sign.

Otherwise, if you want dollar formatting for some floats only, then I think you'll have to pre-modify the dataframe (converting those floats to strings):

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame([123.4567, 234.5678, 345.6789, 456.7890],
                  index=['foo','bar','baz','quux'],
                  columns=['cost'])
df['foo'] = df['cost']
df['cost'] = df['cost'].map('${:,.2f}'.format)
print(df)

yields

         cost       foo
foo   $123.46  123.4567
bar   $234.57  234.5678
baz   $345.68  345.6789
quux  $456.79  456.7890
  • 2
    This solution does not work in Pandas 0.14. – holocronweaver Jul 3 '14 at 19:10
  • 2
    This solution still works properly for me as of pandas 0.22. – Taylor Edmiston Feb 3 '18 at 20:31
  • 2
    as shown e.g. here, you can modify the options only for the a given block by using with pd.option_context('display.float_format', '${:,.2f}'.format'): – Andre Holzner Aug 17 '18 at 16:18
60

If you don't want to modify the dataframe, you could use a custom formatter for that column.

import pandas as pd
pd.options.display.float_format = '${:,.2f}'.format
df = pd.DataFrame([123.4567, 234.5678, 345.6789, 456.7890],
                  index=['foo','bar','baz','quux'],
                  columns=['cost'])


print df.to_string(formatters={'cost':'${:,.2f}'.format})

yields

        cost
foo  $123.46
bar  $234.57
baz  $345.68
quux $456.79
  • Is it possible to get the formatter to work on a multilevel column? – user2579685 Sep 21 '15 at 14:05
  • AFAICT, this example works without the second line pd.options.display.float_format = '${:,.2f}'.format – pianoJames Jan 24 '18 at 15:21
29

As of Pandas 0.17 there is now a styling system which essentially provides formatted views of a DataFrame using Python format strings:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

constants = pd.DataFrame([('pi',np.pi),('e',np.e)],
                   columns=['name','value'])
C = constants.style.format({'name': '~~ {} ~~', 'value':'--> {:15.10f} <--'})
C

which displays

enter image description here

This is a view object; the DataFrame itself does not change formatting, but updates in the DataFrame are reflected in the view:

constants.name = ['pie','eek']
C

enter image description here

However it appears to have some limitations:

  • Adding new rows and/or columns in-place seems to cause inconsistency in the styled view (doesn't add row/column labels):

    constants.loc[2] = dict(name='bogus', value=123.456)
    constants['comment'] = ['fee','fie','fo']
    constants
    

enter image description here

which looks ok but:

C

enter image description here

  • Formatting works only for values, not index entries:

    constants = pd.DataFrame([('pi',np.pi),('e',np.e)],
                   columns=['name','value'])
    constants.set_index('name',inplace=True)
    C = constants.style.format({'name': '~~ {} ~~', 'value':'--> {:15.10f} <--'})
    C
    

enter image description here

  • 2
    This should be now the accepted answer... – Nicolás Oct 23 '18 at 13:39
  • 1
    Can I use the DataFrame.style from inside the interpreter? – Jms Jan 10 at 23:21
16

Similar to unutbu above, you could also use applymap as follows:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame([123.4567, 234.5678, 345.6789, 456.7890],
                  index=['foo','bar','baz','quux'],
                  columns=['cost'])

df = df.applymap("${0:.2f}".format)
  • I like using this approach before calling df.to_csv() to make sure all the columns in my .csv file have the same "digit width." Thanks! – jeschwar Oct 25 '18 at 15:44
0

I like using pandas.apply() with python format().

import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([1.357, 1.489, 2.333333])

make_float = lambda x: "${:,.2f}".format(x)
s.apply(make_float)

Also, it can be easily used with multiple columns...

df = pd.concat([s, s * 2], axis=1)

make_floats = lambda row: "${:,.2f}, ${:,.3f}".format(row[0], row[1])
df.apply(make_floats, axis=1)
0

summary:


    df = pd.DataFrame({'money': [100.456, 200.789], 'share': ['100,000', '200,000']})
    print(df)
    print(df.to_string(formatters={'money': '${:,.2f}'.format}))
    for col_name in ('share',):
        df[col_name] = df[col_name].map(lambda p: int(p.replace(',', '')))
    print(df)
    """
        money    share
    0  100.456  100,000
    1  200.789  200,000

        money    share
    0 $100.46  100,000
    1 $200.79  200,000

         money   share
    0  100.456  100000
    1  200.789  200000
    """

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