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Recently I wrote a recursion-based algorithm to print a binary tree horizontally. Generally I don't have any problems converting recursion-based algorithms to iteration-based ones but I just can't figure out how to do this.

say we a vector

std::vector<int> tree = {10,9,8,7,6,5,4};

which represents the following tree:

     10
    / \
   9   8
  /\   /\
 7 6   5 4

my algorithm works by taking the following routes:

index ->  left -> left      Or in our case 10 -> 9 -> 7
               -> right                            -> 6
      -> right -> left                        -> 8 -> 5
               -> right                            -> 4

etc and expanding depending on the size of the tree. What I can't wrap my mind around is how I can translate the code to while loops when I use recursion conditionally. I am not that good at explaining so here is the code.

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <unistd.h>

/* The Padding function handles the spacing and the vertical lines whenever we print a  *
 * right child. This depends on the previous parent-child hierarchy of the child        *
 * Printer handles the work of printing the elements and uses a depth-first-search      *
 * algorithm as it's core. Left children are printed horizontally while the right ones  *   
 * are printed vertically. Print_tree is a wrapper. It also finds the max-length value  *
 * which will be used for formatting so that the formatting won't get messed up because *
 * of the different number of digits.                                                   */           

std::string do_padding (unsigned index, unsigned mlength){
  std::string padding;
  while(int((index-1)/2) != 0){
    padding = (int((index-1)/2) % 2 == 0) ?
    std::string(mlength+4,' ') + " "  + padding :
    std::string(mlength+3,' ') + "| " + padding ;
    index = int((index-1)/2);
  }
  return padding;
}

template <class T>
void printer (std::vector<T> const & tree, unsigned index, unsigned mlength){
  auto last = tree.size() - 1 ;
  auto  left = 2 * index + 1 ;
  auto  right = 2 * index + 2 ;
  std::cout << " " << tree[index] << " " ;
  if (left <= last){
    auto llength = std::to_string(tree[left]).size();
    std::cout << "---" << std::string(mlength - llength,'-');
    printer(tree,left,mlength);
    if (right <= last) {
      auto rlength = std::to_string(tree[right]).size();
      std::cout << std::endl<< do_padding(right,mlength) << std::string(mlength+ 3,' ') << "| " ;
      std::cout << std::endl << do_padding(right,mlength) << std::string(mlength+ 3,' ') << "└─" <<
      std::string(mlength - rlength,'-');
      printer(tree,right,mlength);
    }
  }
}

template <class T>
void print_tree (std::vector<T> & tree){
  unsigned mlength = 0;
  for (T & element : tree){
    auto length = std::to_string(element).size();
    if (length > mlength) {
      mlength = length;
    }
  }
  std::cout <<  std::fixed << std::string(mlength- std::to_string(tree[0]).size(),' ') ;
  printer(tree,0,mlength);
}

int main() {
  std::vector<int> test;
  for (auto i =0; i != 200; ++i) {
    test.push_back(rand() % 12200);
  }
  std::make_heap(test.begin(),test.end());
  std::cout << std::endl << "Press ENTER to show heap tree.." << std::endl;
  std::cin.ignore();
  print_tree(test);
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

It's probably not worth rewriting this but I would like to know how to handle such a recursion in case I have to do something similar in the future.

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I remember, you posted the Print heap array in tree format question. So, to me (without having read the code), your core algorithm for tree traversal is a DFS.

What you can do to make this recursive algorithm iterative is to use a stack. The stack basically holds all visited nodes and enables to walk back the path it took. An example is given at Iterative DFS vs Recursive DFS and different elements order.

  • This appears to be exactly what I'm looking for. Since we will have to use a stack though, I am wondering if it's worth it. It feels like it's taking away the advantages of using an iterative method. – Veritas Jan 5 '14 at 18:58
  • "[...] advantages of using an iterative method." did you mean recursive? Anyway: advantages and disadvantages are described in the linked question. – Sebastian Dressler Jan 5 '14 at 19:00
  • Well I find the advantage of iteration to be that it doesn't use system stack. If I have to use a stack myself and lose readability it doesn't seem to make much sense to use the iterative method. I'm not that great on the theoretical part, I'm pretty much self-taught so maybe I got it wrong. – Veritas Jan 5 '14 at 19:07
  • I think the crucial point is to get the ordering of the items on the stack right (reverse!). Personally I'd prefer the iterative method, b/c I think it might be easier to debug plus it's portable to e.g. VHDL, but that may not matter ;) – Sebastian Dressler Jan 5 '14 at 19:17
  • Thanks for your help! Much appreciated. – Veritas Jan 5 '14 at 19:56
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For most algorithms that walk through a tree, you will need an additional data structure if you want to formulate them in a non-recursive way. For depth first traversal (as in your case), you'll typically use a stack (for breadth first traversal, a queue is used...)

In pseudo-code, printing the tree would look like

function print_tree(tree_vector)
  s = new stack<int>()
  s.push(0)
  while (!s.empty())
    index = s.pop()
    print (tree_vector[index])
    left = 2*index + 1
    right = 2*index + 2
    if (right < tree_vector.size())
      s.push(right)
    if (left < tree_vector.size())
      s.push(left)
  end while
end function

Note that this stack implicitely represents the call stack internally used by the compiler when making the recursive calls.

  • Very clear answer, it also addresses my concerns on Sebastian's answer. Surprisingly there isn't much of a loss on readability. – Veritas Jan 5 '14 at 19:16
  • By the way, I am not sure since this is the first time I'm seeing this algorithm but maybe it should check for the right and then for the left? – Veritas Jan 5 '14 at 19:32
  • You're right: in order to get the same behaviour as in the original algorithm, the order of the condition checks should be exchanged ... – MartinStettner Jan 6 '14 at 12:21

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