22

I have a file:

header
trigger
text1
text2
trigger
text5
trigger
...
trigger
...

I want sed to only match between the first two occurrences of 'trigger'. So I tried:

sed -n '/trigger/,/trigger/p'

But as the man page for sed says, that matches all occurrences within two lines with 'trigger'. I want sed to quit after the first match, so the output would be:

trigger
text1
text2
trigger

How do I accomplish this?

27

You can do this with a loop in GNU sed:

sed -n '/trigger/{p; :loop n; p; /trigger/q; b loop}'

Explanation:

  1. When you see the first /trigger/, start a block of commands
  2. p -- print the line
  3. :loop -- set a label named loop
  4. n -- get the next line
  5. p -- print the line
  6. /trigger/q -- if the line matches /trigger/ then exit sed
  7. jump to loop
  • Aren't you missing a semicolon after b loop? – Mateusz Piotrowski Nov 4 '16 at 18:31
  • 1
    @MateuszPiotrowski no, I tried it again now, it works just like that – janos Nov 4 '16 at 18:32
  • Maybe it's just my OS X sed then. – Mateusz Piotrowski Nov 4 '16 at 18:34
  • 1
    @MateuszPiotrowski yeah, unfortunately it doesn't work in BSD sed. At all. I'd be very interested in making that work. I added a note to clarify that. Btw some packages add GNU tools in OSX, with a "g" prefix, such as gsed, gawk, gdate. You can try, maybe you have it. – janos Nov 4 '16 at 18:51
  • Amazing! Thanks for posting this. – phyatt May 8 '17 at 19:11
2

While jason's ans is what you're looking for, I would have preferred using awk for this task

awk '/trigger/{p++} p==2{print; exit} p>=1' file

Output:

trigger
text1
text2
trigger

This would provide more flexibility to chose lines between nth and mthe occurrence of trigger.

E.g.

$ awk -v n=2 -v m=3 '/trigger/{p++} p==m{print; exit} p>=n' file
trigger
text5
trigger
  • Thanks. In this particular case, I'm actually needing sed because of a bunch of other commands I haven't shown in the question, but I'd definitely find your awk based solution in the general case. And definitely so for flexibility of the n/mth occurence. Thanks again! – PonyEars Jan 6 '14 at 7:45
0

Another awk variation:

awk '/trigger/{f++} f; f>1 {exit}' file

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