2

I am using a module in a script but one action inside the host application doesn't load this module so the script fails. It's fine if it fails because it doesn't need to run, but I don't want to see the error message box.

Is there a way to check if the module is available, like:

isavailable ( mymodule )

# safe to use the module

But I also want the function to early return, break the execution if it's not available.

3
  • Is this one of your own modules, or part of a package that was installed as a setuptools distribution?
    – Lukas Graf
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:38
  • It's a built in module but not mine or python's. It's the app's own module that's loaded at startup.
    – Joan Venge
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:39
  • 1
    Ok, then @kroolik's answer is the way to go. (In case of a setuptools package it would have been better to check for pkg_resources.get_distribution('foobar'))
    – Lukas Graf
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:42

6 Answers 6

3
try:
    import my_module
except ImportError:
    available = False
else:
    available = True
12
  • Wouldn't this, in fact, import the module? I suppose you could define a function that does this e.g. def import_avail(module): try: __import__(module) except ImportError: return False else: return True but otherwise you'll have one heck of a side effect!
    – Adam Smith
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:42
  • @adsmith, you can move the try: import except: else: clause into eval and check for errors/sentinel variables. And yes, by importing you are exposing yourself to side-effects of the module's init, but then, I would really reevaluate if I would use a module that fires a bomb on import.
    – Maciej Gol
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:50
  • Thanks, btw do you know if I can just halt the execution using return? I am not inside a function, but I want the rest of the commands that comes after not to be executed. Not sure how I could modify your code to do that. I guess I can just encapsulate the rest of the code in an if statement but it's long.
    – Joan Venge
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:54
  • 1
    @JoanVenge, I would go with raise ImportError('Module `my_module` is not available.') and handle the ImportError in the importing module, but that depends on your use case. Sometimes you might want to mock my_module with my_module_compat when the prior is not available, try: import my_module except ImportError: import my_module_compat as my_module. my_module_compat would either implement a noop variant of my_module, or whole different implementation.
    – Maciej Gol
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 20:00
  • @kroolik: Why raise ImportError(…)? You're just handling ImportError by raising an almost-identical error with a different message…
    – abarnert
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 20:40
3

You can do the following:

import importlib

def import_if_available(name, package=None):
    try:
        return importlib.import_module(name, package)
    except ImportError:
        return None

print import_if_available('os.path')

From importlib documentation.

The purpose of the importlib package is two-fold. One is to provide an implementation of the import statement (and thus, by extension, the import() function) in Python source code. This provides an implementation of import which is portable to any Python interpreter. This also provides a reference implementation which is easier to comprehend than one implemented in a programming language other than Python. Two, the components to implement import are exposed in this package, making it easier for users to create their own custom objects (known generically as an importer) to participate in the import process. Details on custom importers can be found in PEP 302.

6
  • 1
    No reason to do this rather than just a regular import.
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:40
  • 1
    Your answer also hardcodes the module name, and the question doesn't indicate that the module name needs to be dynamic.
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:42
  • Answer edited, my previous version of the answer was addressing to this version. Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:48
  • 1
    import_if_available("namespace.package") - oops, doesn't work. That's why you shouldn't use __import__ unless you really know what you're doing.
    – Lukas Graf
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 19:48
  • @LukasGraf what about now? ;) Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 20:11
2

The easiest way to check if a module is available is to import it. And this is almost always what you want, as well. If the module isn't available, this will fail. If the module is available… well, the reason you're checking is because you need to verify that you will be able to import it, so you're not wasting any time importing it now.

More generally, in Python, it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. If you want to know whether you can do something, just try to do it.

So, this is almost an answer on its own:

import mymodule

The code will "early return, break the execution if it's not available." The only problem is that you don't want to see the error message.

There are two ways around this.


First, you could wrap the code up like this:

try:
    import mymodule
except ImportError:
    pass
else:
    # everything else you were going to do.

Whether "the code" is the whole function body, or the line of code that calls the function, or a chunk of top-level code in your script or module, or whatever, it makes no difference.


If you want to avoid the extra block indent, you can "return early" in various different ways. (Although really, it's almost always trivial to just extract all the indented code out into a new function, which means you end up with just a one-line function call being in the else block.)

How you do that depends on what level you're trying to return from, and that isn't clear from your question. If you want to return early from a function, just return (possibly with an appropriate value). If you want to return early from the whole program, just sys.exit(0). So:

try:
    import mymodule
except ImportError:
    sys.exit(0)
# the rest of your code

You could also exit with a positive value, which is a way to tell the shell or whoever else called your program that it "failed", without printing out an error traceback.

1

Although it's a little unusual to want a called function to halt execution, you can do it, as shown below. You'll have to pass the module's name as a string to the function, since presumably the variable mymodule won't exist yet when it's called. If it's successful it will return the imported module so the result can be assigned to variable name for subsequent use.

import sys

def isavailable(modulename):
    try:
        module = __import__(modulename)
    except ImportError:
        sys.exit(1)  # stop execution
    else:
        return module

Sample usage:

mymodule = isavailable('mymodule')  # program will terminate if not found
mymodule.method()
2
  • 1
    Same as with @Raydel's answer: isavailable("namespace.package") will fail.
    – Lukas Graf
    Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 20:11
  • @LukasGraf see my new version. Commented Jan 6, 2014 at 20:13
0

I am not sure if this comes late, but I believe that an easy way to check for this would be using the sys.modules dict:

import sys

if 'my_module' in sys.modules: 
    print ('Module available')
else:
    print ('Module not available')

If you want to put this in a function:

import sys

def isavailable(m):
    if m in sys.modules: 
        return True
    else:
        return False

isavailable('mymodule')
0

sys.modules check appears to be more elegant? Unfortunately while working in notebook, does not seem to work when used in py file when run as python mycode.py. Have no idea why - I guess "replace user and press anykey?"

import sys

# https://stackoverflow.com/questions/20957811/how-to-check-if-a-module-is-available-for-import
if 'geopandas' in sys.modules:
    print ('geopandas is available')
else:
    print ('geopandas is not available') # for whatever reason prints this when in fact is available

# redundant, just for the record

try:
    import geopandas as gpd
except ImportError:
    print('Geopandas is not available. Please "conda install geopandas",\n \
    or switch environment where geopandas is installed "conda activate geopandas_env_name"')
    sys.exit(0)
# the rest of your code

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

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