1

I wish to start with a zero-size matrix and keep on assigning columns(number of rows being fixed always) to it either on the left side or the right side based on the direction choice.

Some of the options that I am considering are:

1) Grow the matrix in the right direction and then use circular shift. But if I do this I need to OR the new matrix with the existing matrix which have different number of columns.

So in this case I need to find a simple way of ORing the two matrices of unequal dimensions which I don't know.

2) Somehow (I don't know how yet) I can automatically expand left hand side of the matrix in Matlab like Matlab supports right hand side expansion of the matrix just by assigning values out-of the bound.

Note: I don't want to use padding as in my situation it will lead to a lot of if-else blocks.

For e.g.

mat = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]

If direction is left and

new_mat = [10 11; 12 13; 14 15]

appended_mat = [10 11 1 2 3; 12 13 4 5 6; 14 15 7 8 9]

Please help me.

Thanks.

  • Actually I find avoiding a lot of if statements convenient when trying to write a short function to do some simple scalar additions and/or multiplications. Make sure to watch the readability& maintainability of your code though. If it is just about appending several times, you will probably want to write a function wrapper around the code you will eventually use. – Dennis Jaheruddin Jan 7 '14 at 13:44
2

Here is a simple one line solution to this question, :

Assuming you have two matrices 'old' and 'new' and direction 1 if right, and 0 if left.

[old new]*direction + [new old]*~direction
  • Thanks, this really helped. I was looking for something like this. – DEEPMALA Jan 9 '14 at 6:30
3

Say you have your existing matrix

mat = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]

and you want to include new rows (of equal length) either on the left or right side, e.g.

new_mat = [10 11; 12 13; 14 15]

You can put them together using:

appended_mat = [new_mat mat]

which gives you

appended_mat =

    10    11     1     2     3
    12    13     4     5     6
    14    15     7     8     9
  • I don't want to use this approach as then I will have to write if else condition for direction and then if it is left direction, I will use [new_mat mat]' and if it is right direction, I will use [mat new_mat]'. But I want to avoid if-else blocks. – DEEPMALA Jan 7 '14 at 6:20
  • Hmm I see, I'm afraid I don't know how to do that to be honest. – Fraukje Jan 7 '14 at 6:31
  • 2
    @DEEPMALA: Why do you want to avoid if-else blocks if I may ask? You say you have a choice, either left or right. Choices are implemented as if-else blocks. – Rody Oldenhuis Jan 7 '14 at 6:41
  • I am just looking for an alternative approach where I can avoid if-else. but of course if I don't get any other solution, I will use the above mentioned approach only. – DEEPMALA Jan 7 '14 at 8:11
1

You could write a little function like this:

function [ B ] = appendLR( A,newCol,direction )
  Z{1,2} = A;
  Z{1,2+direction} = newCol;
  B = cell2mat(Z);
end

direction is either 1 for appending on the right or -1 for the left side.

Example:

A = reshape(1:30,5,6);

1     6    11    16    21    26
2     7    12    17    22    27
3     8    13    18    23    28
4     9    14    19    24    29
5    10    15    20    25    30

newCol = 42*ones(5,1);

42
42
42
42
42

and finally:

B = appendLR(A,newCol,-1)

42     1     6    11    16    21    26
42     2     7    12    17    22    27
42     3     8    13    18    23    28
42     4     9    14    19    24    29
42     5    10    15    20    25    30

newCol could also be a matrix as long as the number of rows is equal, as stated!


Alternative solution:

function [ B ] = appendLR( A,newCol,direction )
  Z = [A newCol];
  B = circshift(Z,[0,direction<0]);
end

works equally.

1

OK, I like a challence :)

%// Your matrices
mat = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9];
new_mat = [10 11; 12 13; 14 15];

%// You can of course re-define everything, such that your matrices are 
%// defined as in this cell-array:
mats = {mat new_mat};

%// Set the direction
direction = 1; %// '1' for append to-the-right
%//direction = 2; %// '2' for append to-the-left

%// Auxiliary cell array, needed to avoid 'if-else'
directions = {1:size(mats,2)  size(mats,2):-1:1};
%// or, if you wrap this in a function which concatenates just 2 matrices:
%// directions = {[1 2]  [2 1]};

%// The actual concatentation
appended_mat = horzcat(mats{directions{direction}})

But, in all honesty, I'd urge you to just use if-else constructs. This trick is nice (as is thewaywewalk's function, +1 to you sir), but they are cramped, twisted, contorted, ugly, inefficient, overly complicated, poorly maintainable, etc. etc. ways to work around the seemingly arbitrary constraint you pose of not using if-else. What you want to accomplish can be accomplished simply and elegantly by an if-else. If you don't think so, I smell trouble; then there is probably a deeper problem with your current approach.

  • +0.5 as I also would use if-else constructs actually, one could put them in a function like in my answer, and it shouldn't bother anybody. And +0.5 for disclosing me, that there is something like "Code smell" :D – thewaywewalk Jan 7 '14 at 10:00
  • @thewaywewalk: I also prefer your functional approach, but in MATLAB, I personally try to avoid non-builtin functions whenever possible. Bad programming practice, good MATLAB practice :) Both cell2mat and circshift are m-files, and the core of both is a for-loop. This, plus calling such a function inside a loop or something, may unnecessarily slow things down. – Rody Oldenhuis Jan 7 '14 at 10:04
0

You could try with function handles like this:

mat = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]
new_mat = [10 11; 12 13; 14 15]

right = @(a,b) [a,b]
left = @(a,b) [b,a]

choice = right;

result_mat = choice(mat,new_mat)

of course you still need to make the choice...

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