146

I want to print the second last column or field in awk. The number of fields is variable. I know that I should be able to use $NF but not sure how it can be used.

And this does not seem to work:

awk ' { print ( $NF-- )  } '
  • 10
    NF is the last field index, $NF is the value of the last field – glenn jackman Jan 19 '10 at 21:00
  • that makes sense now. thats why the dollar outside the parenthesis works I suppose – Brian G Feb 11 '10 at 17:09
245
awk '{print $(NF-1)}'

Should work

  • 1
    This does not work for me. I get "title:5: command not found: NF-1" in awk 3.1.8 under Ubuntu. – Gurgeh May 2 '12 at 11:20
  • 8
    @Gurgeh: mind the '! – kay May 6 '12 at 20:21
  • 3
    I would avoid the pre/post decrement to make sure you don't change the value of $NF – Gregory Patmore Feb 25 '15 at 16:32
  • This breaks if you try to get the third last field like awk -F '.' '{print $(NF-2)}' – gies0r Jun 6 '18 at 8:01
  • @Gurgeh: This happens because $(..) invokes a command in a subshell depending on which shell you're using. You can work around this by using $ (NF-1) instead of $(NF-1). – wting Oct 14 '18 at 16:16
21

Small addition to Chris Kannon' accepted answer: only print if there actually is a second last column.

(
echo       | awk 'NF && NF-1 { print ( $(NF-1) ) }'
echo 1     | awk 'NF && NF-1 { print ( $(NF-1) ) }'
echo 1 2   | awk 'NF && NF-1 { print ( $(NF-1) ) }'
echo 1 2 3 | awk 'NF && NF-1 { print ( $(NF-1) ) }'
)
12

It's simplest:

 awk '{print $--NF}' 

The reason the original $NF-- didn't work is because the expression is evaluated before the decrement, whereas my prefix decrement is performed before evaluation.

9
awk ' { print ( $(NF-1) ) }' file
4

You weren't far from the result! This does it:

awk '{NF--; print $NF}' file

This decrements the number of fields in one, so that $NF contains the former penultimate.

Test

Let's generate some numbers and print them on groups of 5:

$ seq 12 | xargs -n5
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
11 12

Let's print the penultimate on each line:

$ seq 12 | xargs -n5 | awk '{NF--; print $NF}'
4
9
11
3

Perl solution similar to Chris Kannon's awk solution:

perl -lane 'print $F[$#F-1]' file

These command-line options are used:

  • n loop around every line of the input file, do not automatically print every line

  • l removes newlines before processing, and adds them back in afterwards

  • a autosplit mode – split input lines into the @F array. Defaults to splitting on whitespace

  • e execute the perl code

The @F autosplit array starts at index [0] while awk fields start with $1.
$#F is the number of elements in @F

  • 1
    or use the negative indexing already provided by perl... $F[-2] – Sundeep Sep 28 '17 at 4:49
2

Did you tried to start from right to left by using the rev command ? In this case you just need to print the 2nd column:

seq 12 | xargs -n5 | rev | awk '{ print $2}' | rev
4
9
11
0

If you have many columns and want to print all but not the three cloumns in the last, then this might help

awk '{ $NF="";$(NF-1)="";$(NF-2)="" ; print $0 }'

0

First decrements the value and then print it -

awk ' { print $(--NF)}' file

OR

rev file|cut -d ' ' -f2|rev

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