I want to insert data in my table, but insert only that doesn't exist in my DB!

here is my code:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidosInsert]
  (@_DE nvarchar(50),
   @_ASSUNTO nvarchar(50),
   @_DATA nvarchar(30) )
AS
BEGIN
   INSERT INTO EmailsRecebidos (De, Assunto, Data)
   VALUES (@_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA)
   WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM EmailsRecebidos 
                   WHERE De = @_DE
                   AND Assunto = @_ASSUNTO
                   AND Data = @_DATA);
END

And the error is:

Msg 156, Level 15, State 1, Procedure EmailsRecebidosInsert, Line 11
Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'WHERE'.

  • 9
    You should not rely on this check alone to ensure no duplicates, it is not thread safe and you will get duplicates when a race condition is met. If you really need unique data add a unique constraint to the table, and then catch the unique constraint violation error. See this answer – GarethD Jan 7 '14 at 12:54
  • 1
    You can use MERGE query or If not exist( select statement ) begin insert values END – Abdul Hannan Ijaz Jan 20 '16 at 6:50
  • It depends on the scenario if you should relay or not on this check. If you are developing a deploy script that writes data to a "static" table for example, this is not an issue. – AxelWass Nov 9 '16 at 16:48
  • you can use "if not exists (select * from..." like this stackoverflow.com/a/43763687/2736742 – A. Morel May 3 '17 at 15:11
  • @GarethD: what do you mean "not thread safe"? It may not be elegant but it looks correct to me. A single insert statement is always a single transaction. It's not as if the SQL Server evaluates the subquery first and then at some later point, and without holding a lock, goes on to do the insert. – Ed Avis Aug 17 '17 at 11:40
up vote 208 down vote accepted

instead of below Code

BEGIN
   INSERT INTO EmailsRecebidos (De, Assunto, Data)
   VALUES (@_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA)
   WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM EmailsRecebidos 
                   WHERE De = @_DE
                   AND Assunto = @_ASSUNTO
                   AND Data = @_DATA);
END

replace with

BEGIN
   IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM EmailsRecebidos 
                   WHERE De = @_DE
                   AND Assunto = @_ASSUNTO
                   AND Data = @_DATA)
   BEGIN
       INSERT INTO EmailsRecebidos (De, Assunto, Data)
       VALUES (@_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA)
   END
END

Updated : (thanks to @Marc Durdin for pointing)

Note that under high load, this will still sometimes fail, because a second connection can pass the IF NOT EXISTS test before the first connection executes the INSERT, i.e. a race condition. See stackoverflow.com/a/3791506/1836776 for a good answer on why even wrapping in a transaction doesn't solve this.

  • 14
    Note that under high load, this will still sometimes fail, because a second connection can pass the IF NOT EXISTS test before the first connection executes the INSERT, i.e. a race condition. See See stackoverflow.com/a/3791506/1836776 for a good answer on why even wrapping in a transaction doesn't solve this. – Marc Durdin Sep 25 '14 at 6:52
  • 7
    SELECT 1 FROM EmailsRecebidos WHERE De = @_DE AND Assunto = @_ASSUNTO AND Data = @_DATA To use 1 instead of * would be more efficient – Reno Feb 10 '15 at 15:13
  • 1
    Put a write lock around the whole thing and then you won't have any chance of duplicates. – Kevin Finkenbinder Mar 31 '16 at 9:53
  • 8
    @jazzcat select * in this case makes no difference whatsoever because it's being used in an EXISTS clause. SQL Server will always optimize it and has been doing it for ages. Since I'm very old I usually write these queries as EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM...) but it is not needed anymore. – Loudenvier Oct 7 '16 at 1:59
  • 7
    Why does this kind of simple question generate more doubt than certainty? – drowa Jun 28 '17 at 18:26

For those looking for the fastest way, I recently came across these benchmarks where apparently using "INSERT SELECT... EXCEPT SELECT..." turned out to be the fastest for 50 million records or more.

Here's some sample code from the article (the 3rd block of code was the fastest):

INSERT INTO #table1 (Id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData)
SELECT Id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData
FROM #table2
WHERE NOT EXISTS (Select Id, guidd From #table1 WHERE #table1.id = #table2.id)
-----------------------------------
MERGE #table1 as [Target]
USING  (select Id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData from #table2) as [Source]
(id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData)
    on [Target].id =[Source].id
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
    INSERT (id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData)
    VALUES ([Source].id, [Source].guidd, [Source].TimeAdded, [Source].ExtraData);
------------------------------
INSERT INTO #table1 (id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData)
SELECT id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData from #table2
EXCEPT
SELECT id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData from #table1
------------------------------
INSERT INTO #table1 (id, guidd, TimeAdded, ExtraData)
SELECT #table2.id, #table2.guidd, #table2.TimeAdded, #table2.ExtraData
FROM #table2
LEFT JOIN #table1 on #table1.id = #table2.id
WHERE #table1.id is null
  • 4
    I like EXCEPT SELECT – Bryan Aug 22 '16 at 16:15
  • First time i've used EXCEPT. Simple and elegant. – jhowe Jun 9 '17 at 16:09
  • But EXCEPT may not be efficient for bulk operations. – Aasish Kr. Sharma Feb 23 at 3:31
  • EXCEPT is not that efficient. – Biswa Aug 3 at 13:02

i would use a merge:

create PROCEDURE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidosInsert]
  (@_DE nvarchar(50),
   @_ASSUNTO nvarchar(50),
   @_DATA nvarchar(30) )
AS
BEGIN
   with data as (select @_DE as de, @_ASSUNTO as assunto, @_DATA as data)
   merge EmailsRecebidos t
   using data s
      on s.de = t.de
     and s.assunte = t.assunto
     and s.data = t.data
    when not matched by target
    then insert (de, assunto, data) values (s.de, s.assunto, s.data);
END

Try below code

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidosInsert]
  (@_DE nvarchar(50),
   @_ASSUNTO nvarchar(50),
   @_DATA nvarchar(30) )
AS
BEGIN
   INSERT INTO EmailsRecebidos (De, Assunto, Data)
   select @_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA
   EXCEPT
   SELECT De, Assunto, Data from EmailsRecebidos
END

The INSERT command doesn't have a WHERE clause - you'll have to write it like this:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidosInsert]
  (@_DE nvarchar(50),
   @_ASSUNTO nvarchar(50),
   @_DATA nvarchar(30) )
AS
BEGIN
   IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM EmailsRecebidos 
                   WHERE De = @_DE
                   AND Assunto = @_ASSUNTO
                   AND Data = @_DATA)
   BEGIN
       INSERT INTO EmailsRecebidos (De, Assunto, Data)
       VALUES (@_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA)
   END
END
  • 1
    You need to handle errors for this procedure because there will be cases where an insert will happen between the check and insert. – Filip De Vos Jan 7 '14 at 12:53
  • @FilipDeVos: true - a possibility, maybe not very likely, but still a possibility. Good point. – marc_s Jan 7 '14 at 13:00
  • What if you wrap both within a transaction? Would that block the possibility? (I'm no expert on transactions, so please forgive if this is a stupid question.) – David Sep 4 '14 at 21:20
  • 1
    See stackoverflow.com/a/3791506/1836776 for a good answer on why a transaction doesn't solve this, @David. – Marc Durdin Sep 25 '14 at 6:51
  • In the IF statement: there's no need to use BEGIN & END if the number of required command lines is just one even if you used more than one line, so you can omit it here. – Wessam El Mahdy Mar 6 '17 at 21:53

I did the same thing with SQL SERVER 2012 and it worked

Insert into #table1 With (ROWLOCK) (Id, studentId, name)
SELECT '18769', '2', 'Alex'
WHERE not exists (select * from #table1 where Id = '18769' and studentId = '2')
  • 1
    Of course it worked, you are using a temporary table (i.e. you don't need to worry about concurrency when using temporary tables). – drowa Jun 28 '17 at 18:31

Depending on your version (2012?) of SQL Server aside from the IF EXISTS you can also use MERGE like so:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidosInsert]
    ( @_DE nvarchar(50)
    , @_ASSUNTO nvarchar(50)
    , @_DATA nvarchar(30))
AS BEGIN
    MERGE [dbo].[EmailsRecebidos] [Target]
    USING (VALUES (@_DE, @_ASSUNTO, @_DATA)) [Source]([De], [Assunto], [Data])
         ON [Target].[De] = [Source].[De] AND [Target].[Assunto] = [Source].[Assunto] AND [Target].[Data] = [Source].[Data]
     WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
        INSERT ([De], [Assunto], [Data])
        VALUES ([Source].[De], [Source].[Assunto], [Source].[Data]);
END

You could use the GO command. That will restart the execution of sql statements after an error. In my case I have a few 1000 INSERT statements, where a handful of those records already exist in the database, I just don't know which ones. I found that after processing a few 100, execution just stops with an error message that it can't INSERT as the record already exists. Quite annoying, but putting a GO solved this. It may not be the fastest solution , but speed was not my problem.

GO
INSERT INTO mytable (C1,C2,C3) VALUES(1,2,3)
GO
INSERT INTO mytable (C1,C2,C3) VALUES(4,5,6)
 etc ...

protected by Mureinik May 2 '15 at 22:07

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