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I have found an interesting performance regression in a small C++ snippet, when I enable C++11:

#include <vector>

struct Item
{
  int a;
  int b;
};

int main()
{
  const std::size_t num_items = 10000000;
  std::vector<Item> container;
  container.reserve(num_items);
  for (std::size_t i = 0; i < num_items; ++i) {
    container.push_back(Item());
  }
  return 0;
}

With g++ (GCC) 4.8.2 20131219 (prerelease) and C++03 I get:

milian:/tmp$ g++ -O3 main.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out

Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

        35.206824 task-clock                #    0.988 CPUs utilized            ( +-  1.23% )
                4 context-switches          #    0.116 K/sec                    ( +-  4.38% )
                0 cpu-migrations            #    0.006 K/sec                    ( +- 66.67% )
              849 page-faults               #    0.024 M/sec                    ( +-  6.02% )
       95,693,808 cycles                    #    2.718 GHz                      ( +-  1.14% ) [49.72%]
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-frontend 
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-backend  
       95,282,359 instructions              #    1.00  insns per cycle          ( +-  0.65% ) [75.27%]
       30,104,021 branches                  #  855.062 M/sec                    ( +-  0.87% ) [77.46%]
            6,038 branch-misses             #    0.02% of all branches          ( +- 25.73% ) [75.53%]

      0.035648729 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  1.22% )

With C++11 enabled on the other hand, the performance degrades significantly:

milian:/tmp$ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 main.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out

Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

        86.485313 task-clock                #    0.994 CPUs utilized            ( +-  0.50% )
                9 context-switches          #    0.104 K/sec                    ( +-  1.66% )
                2 cpu-migrations            #    0.017 K/sec                    ( +- 26.76% )
              798 page-faults               #    0.009 M/sec                    ( +-  8.54% )
      237,982,690 cycles                    #    2.752 GHz                      ( +-  0.41% ) [51.32%]
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-frontend 
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-backend  
      135,730,319 instructions              #    0.57  insns per cycle          ( +-  0.32% ) [75.77%]
       30,880,156 branches                  #  357.057 M/sec                    ( +-  0.25% ) [75.76%]
            4,188 branch-misses             #    0.01% of all branches          ( +-  7.59% ) [74.08%]

    0.087016724 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  0.50% )

Can someone explain this? So far my experience was that the STL gets faster by enabling C++11, esp. thanks to move semantics.

EDIT: As suggested, using container.emplace_back(); instead the performance gets on par with the C++03 version. How can the C++03 version achieve the same for push_back?

milian:/tmp$ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 main.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out

Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

        36.229348 task-clock                #    0.988 CPUs utilized            ( +-  0.81% )
                4 context-switches          #    0.116 K/sec                    ( +-  3.17% )
                1 cpu-migrations            #    0.017 K/sec                    ( +- 36.85% )
              798 page-faults               #    0.022 M/sec                    ( +-  8.54% )
       94,488,818 cycles                    #    2.608 GHz                      ( +-  1.11% ) [50.44%]
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-frontend 
  <not supported> stalled-cycles-backend  
       94,851,411 instructions              #    1.00  insns per cycle          ( +-  0.98% ) [75.22%]
       30,468,562 branches                  #  840.991 M/sec                    ( +-  1.07% ) [76.71%]
            2,723 branch-misses             #    0.01% of all branches          ( +-  9.84% ) [74.81%]

   0.036678068 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  0.80% )
share|improve this question
1  
If you compile to assembly, you can see what's going on under the hood. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/8021874/… – Cogwheel Jan 7 '14 at 17:15
7  
What happens if you change push_back(Item()) to emplace_back() in the C++11 version? – Cogwheel Jan 7 '14 at 17:17
7  
See above, that "fixes" the regression. I still wonder why push_back regresses in performance between C++03 and C++11 though. – milianw Jan 7 '14 at 17:24
1  
@milianw It turns out I was compiling the wrong program. Ignore my comments. – user1508519 Jan 7 '14 at 18:03
2  
With clang3.4 the C++11 version is faster, 0.047s vs 0.058 for the C++98 version – Praetorian Jan 7 '14 at 19:33
up vote 216 down vote accepted

I can reproduce your results on my machine with those options you write in your post.

However, if I also enable link time optimization (I also pass the -flto flag to gcc 4.7.2), the results are identical:

(I am compiling your original code, with container.push_back(Item());)

$ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 -flto regr.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out 

 Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

         35.426793 task-clock                #    0.986 CPUs utilized            ( +-  1.75% )
                 4 context-switches          #    0.116 K/sec                    ( +-  5.69% )
                 0 CPU-migrations            #    0.006 K/sec                    ( +- 66.67% )
            19,801 page-faults               #    0.559 M/sec                  
        99,028,466 cycles                    #    2.795 GHz                      ( +-  1.89% ) [77.53%]
        50,721,061 stalled-cycles-frontend   #   51.22% frontend cycles idle     ( +-  3.74% ) [79.47%]
        25,585,331 stalled-cycles-backend    #   25.84% backend  cycles idle     ( +-  4.90% ) [73.07%]
       141,947,224 instructions              #    1.43  insns per cycle        
                                             #    0.36  stalled cycles per insn  ( +-  0.52% ) [88.72%]
        37,697,368 branches                  # 1064.092 M/sec                    ( +-  0.52% ) [88.75%]
            26,700 branch-misses             #    0.07% of all branches          ( +-  3.91% ) [83.64%]

       0.035943226 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  1.79% )



$ g++ -std=c++98 -O3 -flto regr.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out 

 Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

         35.510495 task-clock                #    0.988 CPUs utilized            ( +-  2.54% )
                 4 context-switches          #    0.101 K/sec                    ( +-  7.41% )
                 0 CPU-migrations            #    0.003 K/sec                    ( +-100.00% )
            19,801 page-faults               #    0.558 M/sec                    ( +-  0.00% )
        98,463,570 cycles                    #    2.773 GHz                      ( +-  1.09% ) [77.71%]
        50,079,978 stalled-cycles-frontend   #   50.86% frontend cycles idle     ( +-  2.20% ) [79.41%]
        26,270,699 stalled-cycles-backend    #   26.68% backend  cycles idle     ( +-  8.91% ) [74.43%]
       141,427,211 instructions              #    1.44  insns per cycle        
                                             #    0.35  stalled cycles per insn  ( +-  0.23% ) [87.66%]
        37,366,375 branches                  # 1052.263 M/sec                    ( +-  0.48% ) [88.61%]
            26,621 branch-misses             #    0.07% of all branches          ( +-  5.28% ) [83.26%]

       0.035953916 seconds time elapsed  

As for the reasons, one needs to look at the generated assembly code (g++ -std=c++11 -O3 -S regr.cpp). In C++11 mode the generated code is significantly more cluttered than for C++98 mode and inlining the function
void std::vector<Item,std::allocator<Item>>::_M_emplace_back_aux<Item>(Item&&)
fails in C++11 mode with the default inline-limit.

This failed inline has a domino effect. Not because this function is being called (it is not even called!) but because we have to be prepared: If it is called, the function argments (Item.a and Item.b) must already be at the right place. This leads to a pretty messy code.

Here is the relevant part of the generated code for the case where inlining succeeds:

.L42:
    testq   %rbx, %rbx  # container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_finish
    je  .L3 #,
    movl    $0, (%rbx)  #, container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_finish_136->a
    movl    $0, 4(%rbx) #, container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_finish_136->b
.L3:
    addq    $8, %rbx    #, container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_finish
    subq    $1, %rbp    #, ivtmp.106
    je  .L41    #,
.L14:
    cmpq    %rbx, %rdx  # container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_finish, container$D13376$_M_impl$_M_end_of_storage
    jne .L42    #,

This is a nice and compact for loop. Now, let's compare this to that of the failed inline case:

.L49:
    testq   %rax, %rax  # D.15772
    je  .L26    #,
    movq    16(%rsp), %rdx  # D.13379, D.13379
    movq    %rdx, (%rax)    # D.13379, *D.15772_60
.L26:
    addq    $8, %rax    #, tmp75
    subq    $1, %rbx    #, ivtmp.117
    movq    %rax, 40(%rsp)  # tmp75, container.D.13376._M_impl._M_finish
    je  .L48    #,
.L28:
    movq    40(%rsp), %rax  # container.D.13376._M_impl._M_finish, D.15772
    cmpq    48(%rsp), %rax  # container.D.13376._M_impl._M_end_of_storage, D.15772
    movl    $0, 16(%rsp)    #, D.13379.a
    movl    $0, 20(%rsp)    #, D.13379.b
    jne .L49    #,
    leaq    16(%rsp), %rsi  #,
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rdi  #,
    call    _ZNSt6vectorI4ItemSaIS0_EE19_M_emplace_back_auxIIS0_EEEvDpOT_   #

This code is cluttered and there is a lot more going on in the loop than in the previous case. Before the function call (last line shown), the arguments must be placed appropriately:

leaq    16(%rsp), %rsi  #,
leaq    32(%rsp), %rdi  #,
call    _ZNSt6vectorI4ItemSaIS0_EE19_M_emplace_back_auxIIS0_EEEvDpOT_   #

Even though this is never actually executed, the loop arranges the things before:

movl    $0, 16(%rsp)    #, D.13379.a
movl    $0, 20(%rsp)    #, D.13379.b

This leads to the messy code. If there is no function call because inlining succeeds, we have only 2 move instructions in the loop and there is no messing going with the %rsp (stack pointer). However, if the inlining fails, we get 6 moves and we mess a lot with the %rsp.

Just to substantiate my theory (note the -finline-limit), both in C++11 mode:

 $ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 -finline-limit=105 regr.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out

 Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

         84.739057 task-clock                #    0.993 CPUs utilized            ( +-  1.34% )
                 8 context-switches          #    0.096 K/sec                    ( +-  2.22% )
                 1 CPU-migrations            #    0.009 K/sec                    ( +- 64.01% )
            19,801 page-faults               #    0.234 M/sec                  
       266,809,312 cycles                    #    3.149 GHz                      ( +-  0.58% ) [81.20%]
       206,804,948 stalled-cycles-frontend   #   77.51% frontend cycles idle     ( +-  0.91% ) [81.25%]
       129,078,683 stalled-cycles-backend    #   48.38% backend  cycles idle     ( +-  1.37% ) [69.49%]
       183,130,306 instructions              #    0.69  insns per cycle        
                                             #    1.13  stalled cycles per insn  ( +-  0.85% ) [85.35%]
        38,759,720 branches                  #  457.401 M/sec                    ( +-  0.29% ) [85.43%]
            24,527 branch-misses             #    0.06% of all branches          ( +-  2.66% ) [83.52%]

       0.085359326 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  1.31% )

 $ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 -finline-limit=106 regr.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out

 Performance counter stats for './a.out' (10 runs):

         37.790325 task-clock                #    0.990 CPUs utilized            ( +-  2.06% )
                 4 context-switches          #    0.098 K/sec                    ( +-  5.77% )
                 0 CPU-migrations            #    0.011 K/sec                    ( +- 55.28% )
            19,801 page-faults               #    0.524 M/sec                  
       104,699,973 cycles                    #    2.771 GHz                      ( +-  2.04% ) [78.91%]
        58,023,151 stalled-cycles-frontend   #   55.42% frontend cycles idle     ( +-  4.03% ) [78.88%]
        30,572,036 stalled-cycles-backend    #   29.20% backend  cycles idle     ( +-  5.31% ) [71.40%]
       140,669,773 instructions              #    1.34  insns per cycle        
                                             #    0.41  stalled cycles per insn  ( +-  1.40% ) [88.14%]
        38,117,067 branches                  # 1008.646 M/sec                    ( +-  0.65% ) [89.38%]
            27,519 branch-misses             #    0.07% of all branches          ( +-  4.01% ) [86.16%]

       0.038187580 seconds time elapsed                                          ( +-  2.05% )

Indeed, if we ask the compiler to try just a little bit harder to inline that function, the difference in performance goes away.


So what is the take away from this story? That failed inlines can cost you a lot and you should make full use of the compiler capabilities: I can only recommend link time optimization. It gave a significant performance boost to my programs (up to 2.5x) and all I needed to do is to pass the -flto flag. That's a pretty good deal! ;)

However, I do not recommend trashing your code with the inline keyword; let the compiler decide what to do. (The optimizer is allowed to treat the inline keyword as white space anyway.)


Great question, +1!

share|improve this answer
2  
NB: inline has nothing to do with function inlining; it means “defined inline” not “please inline this”. If you want to actually ask for inlining, use __attribute__((always_inline)) or similar. – Jon Purdy Jan 24 '14 at 19:07
1  
@JonPurdy Not quite, for example class member functions are implicitly inline. inline is also a request towards the compiler that you would like the function to be inlined and for example the Intel C++ Compiler used to give performance warnings if it didn't fulfill your request. (I haven't checked icc recently if it still does.) Unfortunately, I've seen people trashing their code with inline and waiting for miracle to happen. I would not use __attribute__((always_inline)); chances are the compiler developers know better what to inline and what not to. (Despite the counterexample here.) – Ali Jan 24 '14 at 19:25
1  
@JonPurdy On the other hand, if you define a function inline which is not a member function of a class, then you have indeed no choice but to mark it inline otherwise you will get multiple definition errors from the linker. If that is what you meant then OK. – Ali Jan 24 '14 at 19:25
1  
Yes, that is what I meant. The standard does say “The inline specifier indicates to the implementation that inline substitution of the function body at the point of call is to be preferred to the usual function call mechanism.” (§7.1.2.2) However, implementations are not required to perform that optimisation, as it’s largely a coincidence that inline functions often happen to be good candidates for inlining. So it’s better to be explicit and use a compiler pragma. – Jon Purdy Jan 25 '14 at 1:05
3  
@JonPurdy As for the first half: Yes, that is what I meant by saying "The optimizer is allowed to treat the inline keyword as white space anyway." As for the compiler pragma, I wouldn't use that, I would leave it up to the link time optimization whether to inline or not. It does a pretty good job; it also automatically resolved this issue discussed here in the answer. – Ali Jan 25 '14 at 1:12

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