37

I have code which works in VC9 (Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 SP1) but not in GCC 4.2 (on Mac):

struct tag {};

template< typename T >
struct C
{   
    template< typename Tag >
    void f( T );                 // declaration only

    template<>
    inline void f< tag >( T ) {} // ERROR: explicit specialization in
};                               // non-namespace scope 'structC<T>'

I understand that GCC would like me to move my explicit specialization outside the class but I can't figure out the syntax. Any ideas?

// the following is not correct syntax, what is?
template< typename T >
template<>
inline void C< T >::f< tag >( T ) {}
32

You can't specialize a member function without explicitly specializing the containing class.
What you can do however is forward calls to a member function of a partially specialized type:

template<class T, class Tag>
struct helper {
    static void f(T);   
};

template<class T>
struct helper<T, tag1> {
    static void f(T) {}
};

template<class T>
struct C {
    // ...
    template<class Tag>
    void foo(T t) {
        helper<T, Tag>::f(t);
    }
};
  • This is similar to the solution I'm using, thanks! I wonder if there's a way to do this less verbosely using Boost? – jwfearn Jan 24 '10 at 20:45
  • 1
    Not really, it doesn't get easier in general. You need a helper function to avoid the issue of "enclosing class has to be explicitly specialized" and you need to move that one into a class to do partial specialization. – Georg Fritzsche Jan 25 '10 at 8:40
8

GCC is in the clear, here. MSVC has a non-standard extension that allows in-class specialization. The standard, however, says:

14.7.3.2:
2. An explicit specialization shall be declared in the namespace of which the template is a member, or, for member templates, in the namespace of which the enclosing class or enclosing class template is a member. An explicit specialization of a member function, member class or static data member of a class template shall be declared in the namespace of which the class template is a member.

Additionally, you can't partially specialize a function. (Though I'm unsure about the details in your case, that would be the final blow.)

You could do this:

#include <iostream>

struct true_type {};
struct false_type {};

template <typename T, typename U>
struct is_same : false_type
{
    static const bool value = false;
};

template <typename T>
struct is_same<T, T> : true_type
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

struct tag1 {};
struct tag2 {};

template< typename T >
struct C
{
    typedef T t_type;

    template< typename Tag >
    void foo( t_type pX)
    {
        foo_detail( pX, is_same<Tag, tag1>() );
    }

private:
    void foo_detail( t_type, const true_type& )
    {
        std::cout << "In tag1 version." << std::endl;
    }
    void foo_detail( t_type, const false_type& )
    {
        std::cout << "In not tag1 version." << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    C<int> c;
    c.foo<tag1>(int());
    c.foo<tag2>(int());
    c.foo<double>(int());
}

Though this is somewhat ugly.

  • 5
    Maybe it is the C++ standard that is not in the clear... If Microsoft can do it why can't the other compilers? – P i Nov 5 '14 at 0:35
1

Try this:

template <> template<typename T> inline void C<T> :: foo<tag2>(T) {}
  • nope, that doesn't work – jwfearn Jan 19 '10 at 23:02
  • sorry - I think I mixed up the order of thw two template qualifiers. Try placing the one with the empty brackets on the very left. – Alexander Gessler Jan 19 '10 at 23:06
  • nope again (error: template partial specialization not allowed) 'foo<tag2' is not allowed). Thanks for the suggestion though. – jwfearn Jan 20 '10 at 0:52
0

I know this may not satisfy you, but I do not believe you may not have a specialization enclosed within a non-explicitly-specialized structure.

template<>
template<>
inline void C< tag1 >::foo< tag2 >( t_type ) {}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.