16

I have an instance of a general purpose class that will be executed both under ASP.NET and a stand alone program. This code is sensative to the process where it is being run - that is, there are certin methods that should not called if running under ASP.NET. How do you determine if the code is executing in an ASP.NET process?

The solution I am currently using is answered below.


I wish someone would add a comment as to why this question has gotten downvoted and/or propose a better way to ask it! I can only assume at least some folks have looked at the question and said "what an idiot, ASP.NET code is .NET code".

1

6 Answers 6

12

HttpContext.Current can also be null within ASP.NET if you're using asynchronous methods, as the asynchronous task happens in a new thread that doesn't share the HttpContext of the original thread. This may or may not be what you want, but if not then I believe that HttpRuntime.AppDomainAppId will be non-null anywhere in an ASP.NET process and null elsewhere.

1
  • 1
    What would be the advantage of using HttpRuntiime.AppDomainAppId vs ghigad's answer which uses HostingEnvironment.IsHosted? Feb 24, 2017 at 15:14
3

Try this:

using System.Web.Hosting;

// ...

if (HostingEnvironment.IsHosted)
{
    // You are in ASP.NET
}
else
{
    // You are in a standalone application
}

Worked for me!

See HostingEnvironment.IsHosted for details...

2

I think what you really want to do is rethink your design. A better way to do this is to use a Factory class that produces different versions of the classes you need (designed to implement interfaces so you can use them interchangeably) depending on how the application is started. This will localize the code to detect web- and non-web-based usage in one place rather than scattering it all over your code.

public interface IDoFunctions
{
    void DoSomething();
}

public static class FunctionFactory
{
  public static IDoFunctions GetFunctionInterface()
  {
     if (HttpContext.Current != null)
     {
        return new WebFunctionInterface();
     }
     else
     {
        return new NonWebFunctionInterface();
     }
   }
}

public IDoFunctions WebFunctionInterface
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        ... do something the web way ...
    }
}

public IDoFunctions NonWebFunctionInterface
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        ... do something the non-web way ...
    }
}
2
  • 4
    Nice idea and way over complicated for what I need which is to toss an exception when a small number of methods are called when running under ASP.NET.
    – jr.
    Oct 17, 2008 at 5:36
  • This will "fail" when running in a Thread if the definition is for "running in an IIS Process", as opposed to "running with a current/valid IIS Request" (this does matter in some cases). So in the end it's a lot of code to show HttpContext.Current != null which has the issue mentioned above.. I'm not opposed to such a design, but it's tangential to the original question and the specific context needs to be accounted for. Feb 8, 2018 at 19:19
1
using System.Diagnostics; 

if (Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName == "w3wp")
    //ASP.NET
1
  • 3
    Please use the edit link explain how this code works and don't just give the code, as an explanation is more likely to help future readers. See also How to Answer. source
    – Jed Fox
    Jan 9, 2017 at 11:15
-1

This is my answer to the question.

First, make sure your project references System.Web and that your code file is "using System.Web;".

public class SomeClass {

  public bool  RunningUnderAspNet    { get; private set; }


  public SomeClass()
    //
    // constructor
    //
  {
    try {
      RunningUnderAspNet = null != HttpContext.Current;
    }
    catch {
      RunningUnderAspNet = false;
    }
  }
}
0
-2
If HttpContext Is Nothing OrElse HttpContext.Current Is Nothing Then
  'Not hosted by web server'
End If
1
  • 1
    HttpContext is the name of a class, so HttpContext can't be null.
    – yfeldblum
    Oct 16, 2008 at 19:13

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