2

According the books, the variations of type integer occupy more or less bytes of memory, depending on the architecture, however the type unsigned short values ​​can get up to 65 535, since the type unsigned long 4 294 967 295.

So far so good, but when we think of the format placeholders, we can see which variations of int type like short and long have your own format placeholders; %hd and %ld, respectively. This way we can know how many bytes will be reserved for this types, because we have we are aware that we are using explicitly the data types, however, for unsigned short and unsigned long types just there a single format placeholder: %u.

For me this means that I have no control about the number that will be set in this variable, I want mean, I must declare the variable like unsigned and the compiler will interpret if he number belongs to range of unsigned short or unsigned long.

What is the correct form of to declare variables of this types?

unsigned short <identifier_variable>;

unsigned short int <identifier_variable>;

or just:

unsigned <identifier_variable>;

and if the number belongs to range of the unsigned short type will reserve 2 bytes for this variable, otherwise if the number assigned belong to unsigned long type all will work normally and the number of bytes reseved for this variable will be 4 bytes.

Then, how I must doing this declarations and is there another format placeholders that I can't find in the GNU documentation?

4
  • What is your question? And is it in C or C++? – Elliott Frisch Jan 7 '14 at 21:31
  • 1. choose C or C++, not both. 2. unsigned is same as unsigned int, unsigned short is same as unsigned short int – Bryan Chen Jan 7 '14 at 21:31
  • uintN_t <stdint.h> in C99. PRIuN <inttypes.h>. – BLUEPIXY Jan 7 '14 at 21:35
  • @ElliottFrisch I Just sign with the tag C++ due the fact of who programming C++ usually have much knowledge in C. I draw attention at title for C, but looking better this not seems a good practice. – Leandro Arruda Jan 7 '14 at 22:47
3

So far so good, but when we think of the format placeholders, we can see which variations of int type like short and long have your own format placeholders; %hd and %ld, respectively. This way we can know how many bytes will be reserved for this types, because we have we are aware that we are using explicitly the data types, however, for unsigned short and unsigned long types just there a single format placeholder: %u.

Correction: unsigned short and unsigned long have %hu and %lu. Notice how these mirror the signed format placeholders. %d and %u are for signed and unsigned ints, respectively. The h and l modifiers change int to either short or long.

%hd     signed short
%hu   unsigned short
%d      signed int
%u    unsigned int
%ld     signed long
%lu   unsigned long

What is the correct form of to declare variables of this types?

unsigned short <identifier_variable>;

unsigned short int <identifier_variable>;

or just:

unsigned <identifier_variable>;

The first two are equivalent. The last one unsigned means unsigned int rather than unsigned short.

Note that short is shorthand for short int, and long is short for long int. Also signed is implied, so signed int is the same as int. (Exception: char is not the same as signed char, it's a distinct type with implementation-defined signedness.)

Here are all the different ways of writing the basic integer types:

char
signed char
unsigned char
short          AKA signed short, signed short int
unsigned short AKA unsigned short int
int            AKA signed, signed int
unsigned       AKA unsigned int
long           AKA signed long, signed long int
unsigned long  AKA unsigned long int
1

%u format specifier is specifying that the variable content should be parsed as unsigned value. You can combine that with length sub-specifier, so you can have %hu (for unsigned short), %lu (for unsigned long), etc.

There is a nice table available here: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/printf/

1

About "placeholders" it will be useful to read the C Standard

h Specifies that a following d, i, o, u, x, or X conversion specifier applies to a short int or unsigned short int argument (the argument will have been promoted according to the integer promotions, but its value shall be converted to short int or unsigned short int before printing); or that a following n conversion specifier applies to a pointer to a short int argument.

As for the declarations then type specifier unsigned used alone is equivalent to unsigned int. If you want to declare an object of type unsigned short you have to specify the both simple specifiers

unsigned short SomeVariable;
1

for unsigned short and unsigned long types just there a single format placeholder: %u.

No. For unsigned sort the format specifier used is %hu while %lu is used for unsigned long.

C11: 7.21.6 Formatted input/output functions:

h Specifies that a following d, i, o, u, x, or X conversion specifier applies to a short int or unsigned short int argument (the argument will have been promoted according to the integer promotions, but its value shall be converted to short int or unsigned short int before printing); or that a following n conversion specifier applies to a pointer to a short int argument.


What is the correct form of to declare variables of this types?

First two are are correct declaration for unsigned sort type. But the third is wrong. It is equivalent to

unsigned int <identifier_variable>;
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.