48

Like the title suggests, I have a short demo program that compiles on with all of those compilers, but core dumps when ran after compiling with gcc 4.8 and gcc 4.9:

Any ideas as to why?

#include <unordered_map>

struct Foo : std::unordered_map<int,int> {
    using std::unordered_map<int, int>::unordered_map;
    // ~Foo() = default; // adding this allows it to work
};

struct Bar {
    Bar(Foo f = {}) : _f(std::move(f)) {}
    // using any of the following constructors fixes the problem:
    // Bar(Foo f = Foo()) : _f(std::move(f)) {}
    // Bar(Foo f = {}) : _f(f) {}

    Foo _f;
};

int main() {
    Bar b;

    // the following code works as expected
    // Foo f1 = {};
    // Foo f2 = std::move(f1);
}

My compilation settings:

g++ --std=c++11 main.cpp

Here is a backtrace from GDB:

#0  0x00007fff95d50866 in __pthread_kill ()
#1  0x00007fff90ba435c in pthread_kill ()
#2  0x00007fff8e7d1bba in abort ()
#3  0x00007fff9682e093 in free ()
#4  0x0000000100002108 in __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node_base*>::deallocate ()
#5  0x0000000100001e7d in std::allocator_traits<std::allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node_base*> >::deallocate ()
#6  0x0000000100001adc in std::__detail::_Hashtable_alloc<std::allocator<std::__detail::_Hash_node<std::pair<int const, int>, false> > >::_M_deallocate_buckets ()
#7  0x000000010000182e in std::_Hashtable<int, std::pair<int const, int>, std::allocator<std::pair<int const, int> >, std::__detail::_Select1st, std::equal_to<int>, std::hash<int>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<false, false, true> >::_M_deallocate_buckets ()
#8  0x000000010000155a in std::_Hashtable<int, std::pair<int const, int>, std::allocator<std::pair<int const, int> >, std::__detail::_Select1st, std::equal_to<int>, std::hash<int>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<false, false, true> >::~_Hashtable ()
#9  0x000000010000135c in std::unordered_map<int, int, std::hash<int>, std::equal_to<int>, std::allocator<std::pair<int const, int> > >::~unordered_map ()
#10 0x00000001000013de in Foo::~Foo ()
#11 0x0000000100001482 in Bar::~Bar ()
#12 0x0000000100001294 in main ()

*** error for object 0x1003038a0: pointer being freed was not allocated ***

27
  • 2
    what flags are you using on gcc? – ThomasMcLeod Jan 7 '14 at 22:17
  • 10
    A bit simplified version: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/7be23631a99ee9f0 (reduced to default argument {} and std::unordered_map constructors/destructors) – zch Jan 7 '14 at 22:31
  • 6
    @DanielFrey, reference? I don't think inheriting standard containers is illegal. – zch Jan 7 '14 at 23:17
  • 2
    @vmrob I recall seeing a bug report, and I think Foo f = {} is the culprit. Here it is. It's probably unrelated, though. If so, ignore my comment. – user1508519 Jan 7 '14 at 23:46
  • 1
    I'm not sure why I first thought it was with libstdc++, but after realizing that just adding that explicitly defined default destructor fixed it, I couldn't imagine it being the library. I have to agree, I don't think it has to do with unordered_map. See this and this. I may be wrong though. – user1508519 Jan 10 '14 at 23:50
11

Update

It appears a fix for the problem has been checked in.


Interesting question. It definitely seems to be a bug with how GCC handles = {} initialized default arguments, which was a late addition to the standard. The problem can be reproduced with a pretty simple class in place of std::unordered_map<int,int>:

#include <utility>

struct PtrClass
{
    int *p = nullptr;
 
    PtrClass()
    {
        p = new int;
    }

    PtrClass(PtrClass&& rhs) : p(rhs.p)
    {
        rhs.p = nullptr;
    }

    ~PtrClass()
    {
        delete p;
    }
};

void DefArgFunc(PtrClass x = {})
{
    PtrClass x2{std::move(x)};
}

int main()
{
    DefArgFunc();
    return 0;
}

Compiled with g++ (Ubuntu 4.8.1-2ubuntu1~12.04) 4.8.1, it displays the same problem:

*** glibc detected *** ./a.out: double free or corruption (fasttop): 0x0000000001aa9010 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x7eb96)[0x7fc2cd196b96]
./a.out[0x400721]
./a.out[0x4006ac]
/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xed)[0x7fc2cd13976d]
./a.out[0x400559]
======= Memory map: ========
bash: line 7:  2916 Aborted                 (core dumped) ./a.out

Digging a little deeper, GCC seems to create an extra object (though it only calls the constructor and destructor once each) when you use this syntax:

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

struct SimpleClass
{    
    SimpleClass()
    {
        std::cout << "In constructor: " << this << std::endl;
    }

    ~SimpleClass()
    {
        std::cout  << "In destructor: " << this << std::endl;
    }
};

void DefArgFunc(SimpleClass x = {})
{
        std::cout << "In DefArgFunc: " << &x << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    DefArgFunc();
    return 0;
}

Output:

In constructor: 0x7fffbf873ebf
In DefArgFunc: 0x7fffbf873ea0
In destructor: 0x7fffbf873ebf

Changing the default argument from SimpleClass x = {} to SimpleClass x = SimpleClass{} produces

In constructor: 0x7fffdde483bf
In DefArgFunc: 0x7fffdde483bf
In destructor: 0x7fffdde483bf

as expected.

What seems to be happening is that an object is created, the default constructor is called, and then something similar to a memcpy is performed. This "ghost object" is what is passed to the move constructor and modified. However, the destructor is called on the original, unmodified, object, which now shares some pointer with the move-constructed object. Both eventually try to free it, causing the issue.

The four changes that you noticed fixed the problem make sense given the above explanation:

// 1
// adding the destructor inhibits the compiler generated move constructor for Foo,
// so the copy constructor is called instead and the moved-to object gets a new
// pointer that it doesn't share with the "ghost object", hence no double-free
~Foo() = default;

// 2
// No  `= {}` default argument, GCC bug isn't triggered, no "ghost object"
Bar(Foo f = Foo()) : _f(std::move(f)) {}

// 3
// The copy constructor is called instead of the move constructor
Bar(Foo f = {}) : _f(f) {}

// 4
// No  `= {}` default argument, GCC bug isn't triggered, no "ghost object"
Foo f1 = {};
Foo f2 = std::move(f1);

Passing an argument to the constructor (Bar b(Foo{});) rather than using the default argument also solves the problem.

4
  • Yep, it's definitely a bug that persists in gcc 4.9 (or at least the snapshot I have.) clang doesn't have the same bug. There already is a bug report and a couple of others that seem similar. But +1 for clarifying the issue with the test case. The problem goes away if you do SimpleClass x = SimpleClass{}. – user1508519 Jan 15 '14 at 19:39
  • Yeah, sorry, I see the full comment chain on the question now. I hadn't read through all the hidden comments before. Oh well, I found it an interesting exercise anyway :) – jerry Jan 15 '14 at 19:47
  • @remyabel I tried several different default arguments, only = {...} triggered the bug. I have to guess it's related to the late addition, but it's still strange because it should act exactly the same as SimpleClass x = SimpleClass{}, it's only a grammar change. The output when &x == 0x7fffdde483bf was from code that used that syntax. – jerry Jan 15 '14 at 20:05
  • @jerry I think the semantics of = SimpleClass{} and = {} are different. The first is default initialization in the case of non-POD types and just about the same as SimpleClass a; memset(a,0,sizeof(a)); for POD types whereas Simpleclass a = {} is construction via std::initializer_list for non-POD types and aggregate initialization for POD types. I don't really ever use the = SimpleClass{} form though, so I might be wrong. – vmrob Jan 16 '14 at 1:56

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