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I'm new to SPSS and I'm a bit stuck on a problem. I have about 200 variables and I want to loop through pairs of them looking for variables with correlation coefficients above 0.7. I know that I can use CORRELATIONS to get a matrix of coefficients but it would be huge and difficult to look through. Basically, in pseudocode, what I want to do is:

for (i = W1_1 to W1_200) {
    for (j = i to W1_200) {
        if CORRELATIONS(i,j)>0.7 {
            print i, j, CORRELATIONS(i,j)
        }
    }
}

I can't for the life of me work out how to do any of this in SPSS. Help!

0

SPSS has a helper function on the CORRELATIONS command to export the correlation matrix. From there you can manipulate the data to give the correlation pairs that meet your criteria. So first, lets make some fake data to illustrate.

*Making fake data.
set seed 5.
input program.
loop i = 1 to 100.
end case.
end loop.
end file.
end input program.
dataset name test.
compute #base = RV.NORMAL(0,1).
vector X(20).
loop #i = 1 to 20.
compute X(#i) = #base*(#i/20)  + RV.NORMAL(0,1).
end loop.
exe.

Now, we can run the CORRELATIONS command and export the table to a new dataset (which I named here Corrs).

DATASET DECLARE Corrs.
CORRELATIONS
  /VARIABLES=X1 to X20
  /MATRIX=OUT('Corrs'). 

Unfortunately SPSS returns the full matrix (plus other info on the sample size). We can only select the rows we are interested in (ones with "CORR" in the ROWTYPE_ column) and then use a DO REPEAT to set the upper or lower half of the matrix to system missing values.

DATASET ACTIVATE Corrs.
SELECT IF ROWTYPE_ = "CORR".
*Now only making lower half of matrix.
COMPUTE #iter = 0.
DO REPEAT X = X1 TO X20.
  COMPUTE #iter = #iter + 1.
  IF #iter > ($casenum-1) X = $SYSMIS.
END REPEAT.

I set them to system missing values because the next part I will reshape the data using VARSTOCASES. This by default drops missing values, so we won't end up having redundant correlation pairs.

VARSTOCASES
/MAKE Corr FROM X1 TO X20
/INDEX X2 (Corr)
/DROP ROWTYPE_.
RENAME VARIABLES (VARNAME_ = X1).

Now you have your correlation pairs list and can just select out the correlations that meet your criteria.

SELECT IF ABS(Corr) >= .5.

Making of the correlation pairs can be made into a MACRO function pretty easily to return the pair list. Below is that function, recreating the exact steps used here.

DEFINE !CorrPairs (!POSITIONAL !CMDEND)
DATASET DECLARE Corrs.
CORRELATIONS
  /VARIABLES=!1
  /MATRIX=OUT('Corrs'). 
DATASET ACTIVATE Corrs.
SELECT IF ROWTYPE_ = "CORR".
COMPUTE #iter = 0.
DO REPEAT X = !1.
  COMPUTE #iter = #iter + 1.
  IF #iter > ($casenum-1) X = $SYSMIS.
END REPEAT.
VARSTOCASES
/MAKE Corr FROM !1
/INDEX X2 (Corr)
/DROP ROWTYPE_.
RENAME VARIABLES (VARNAME_ = X1).
!ENDDEFINE.

The macro just takes a list of variables (in the active dataset) to grab the correlations, and returns a second dataset named Corrs with the correlation pairs and the variable names defined in the X1 and X2 columns. Then after the above macro is defined the above steps can be recreated simply by below.

!CorrPairs X1 to X20.
SELECT IF ABS(Corr) >= .5.
EXECUTE.
0

My suggestion is to use OMS to extract your correlation values from the output into a datafile. Use a macro to only run the correlations you need:

DATASET DECLARE  Correlations.
OMS   /SELECT TABLES  /IF COMMANDS=['Correlations'] SUBTYPES=['Correlations']  
 /DESTINATION FORMAT=SAV NUMBERED=TableNumber_    OUTFILE='Correlations' VIEWER=YES.
define runCorrs ()
!do !i1=1 !to 200
!do !i2=!i1 !to 200
!if (!i2<>!i1) !then
corr !concat("W_",!i1) with !concat("W_",!i2).
!ifend
!doend !doend 
!enddefine.
runCorrs.
OMSEND.
datas act Correlations.
select if var2="Pearson Correlation".
VARSTOCASES /make crlVal  from W_2 to W_200/index=withvar(crlVal)
            /drop TableNumber_ Command_ Subtype_ Label_ Var2.

now you have a nice list of all the correlations to work with:

select if crlVal>0.7.
exe.

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