504

I want two classes with different names to have the same property in CSS. I don't want to repeat the code.

.abc {
   margin-left:20px;
}  
.xyz {
   margin-left:20px;
}
<a class="abc">Lorem</a>
<a class="xyz">Ipsum</a>

Since both classes are doing the same thing, I should be able to merge it into one. How can I do that?

9 Answers 9

966
.abc, .xyz { margin-left: 20px; }

is what you are looking for.

1
  • 16
    +1, exactly what I was looking for. You can also then have a second, separate entry for .abc and/or .xyz for properties you don't want to apply to both e.g. .xyz {font-weight: bold;} will combine to make .xyz bold and margin-left'ed by 20px but .abc only margin-left'ed. Sep 16, 2014 at 8:50
103

You can have multiple CSS declarations for the same properties by separating them with commas:

.abc, .xyz {
   margin-left: 20px;
}
1
  • 4
    although the selected answer is completely correct we can not guarantee that newbies will understand what it is doing. I would go with the one explained more. Since it is more of "how to fish" instead of "here is the fish".
    – Olgun Kaya
    Apr 18, 2019 at 11:58
28

Don’t Repeat Your CSS

 a.abc, a.xyz{
    margin-left:20px;
 }

OR

 a{
    margin-left:20px;
 }
1
  • 4
    I think abc was meant as one class name.. and xyz as another. Your suggestion is to use use a common class name for common properties which is unnecessary and confusing, given the question.
    – Arete
    Jun 13, 2016 at 14:03
22

just seperate the class name with a comma.

.a,.b{
your styles
}
18

If you use as following, your code can be more effective than you wrote. You should add another feature.

.abc, .xyz {
margin-left:20px;
width: 100px;
height: 100px;
} 

OR

a.abc, a.xyz {
margin-left:20px;
width: 100px;
height: 100px;
} 

OR

a {
margin-left:20px;
width: 100px;
height: 100px;
} 
11

And if you have set these classes with their parents before, you should set them with parents (repeat each time) again as below:

parent .abc, parent .xyz
1
  • Thanks :) This is something I should have known, but....
    – KECG
    Feb 9, 2022 at 23:46
9

Using CSS pseudo-classes :is (previously :any and :matches) and :where, you can use comma to match multiple classes on any level.

At the root level, :is(.abc, .xyz) and .abc, .xyz function almost identically. However, :is allows matching only a part of the selector without copying the whole selector multiple times.

For example, if you want to match .root .abc .child and .root .xyz .child, you can write code like this:

.root :is(.abc, .xyz) .child {
   margin-left: 20px;
}  
<div class="root">
  <a class="abc">
    <span class="child">Lorem</span>
  </a>
  <a class="xyz">
    <span class="child">Ipsum</span>
  </a>
</div>

The difference between :is and :where is that :where is ignored when calculating specificity of the selector:

  • specificity of .root :is(.abc, .xyz) .child = specificity of .root .abc .child
  • specificity of .root :where(.abc, .xyz) .child = specificity of .root .child

Both pseudo-classes accept a forgiving selector list, meaning that if one selector fails to be parsed (due to unsupported syntax, either too new, too old or just incorrect), the other selectors would still work. This makes :is useful even at the root level, because it allows combining selectors using modern CSS features without fear that one selector will break the rest.

P.S. This question answers a more difficult variation of the question, but Google returns this page on too many queries, so I think this information will be relevant here.

0
3

You can apply styles to multiple classes at once, by just writing their names and separating them with a comma.

For example, let's say there are two classes with names "one" and "two" and you have to apply some common styles to both of them. You can have a look at the code given below and understand.

.one, .two{ 
display: inline-block;
background-color: #ffffff;
}
1

There is also a way to use @extend to achieve this with SCSS.

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