20

Is null evaluated to 0 and undefined to NaN on arithmetic expressions?

According to some testing it seems so:

> null + null
0

> 4 + null
4

> undefined + undefined
NaN

> 4 + undefined
NaN

Is it safe or correct to assume this? (a quote from a documentation would be A+).

11
  • 4
    The spec.
    – Pointy
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:35
  • 1
    @dystroy, yup but that would be a string concatenation, and not an arithmetic expression.
    – talles
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:35
  • 2
    It's safe like a juggler with 10 torches. If he knows exactly what he doing, then it's safe. Jan 8, 2014 at 16:36
  • 1
    @talles it's exactly the same operator - +
    – Pointy
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:36
  • 1
    @Pointy, Just because it's the same character, doesn't mean it's the same operator. string + <thing> is string concatenation, while int + <thing> is integer addition.
    – Brian S
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

16

Is null evaluated to 0 and undefined to NaN on arithmetic expressions? Is it safe or correct to assume this?

Yes, it is. An "arithmetic expression" would use the ToNumber operation:

 Argument Type | Result
 --------------+--------
 Undefined     | NaN
 Null          | +0
 …             |

It is used in the following "arithmetic" expressions:

It is not used by the equality operators, so null == 0 is false (and null !== 0 anyway)!

5

It seems safe to assume so since, in an arithmetic expression (e.g. addition), the method ToNumber would be called on it, evaluating NaN and +0 from undefined and null respectively:

                     To Number Conversions
╔═══════════════╦════════════════════════════════════════════╗
║ Argument Type ║                   Result                   ║
╠═══════════════╬════════════════════════════════════════════╣
║ Undefined     ║ NaN                                        ║
║               ║                                            ║
║ Null          ║ +0                                         ║
║               ║                                            ║
║ Boolean       ║ The result is 1 if the argument is true.   ║
║               ║ The result is +0 if the argument is false. ║
║               ║                                            ║
║ Number        ║ The result equals the input argument (no   ║
║               ║ conversion).                               ║
║               ║                                            ║
║ String        ║ See grammar and note below.                ║
║               ║                                            ║
║ Object        ║ Apply the following steps:                 ║
║               ║   1. Let primValue be ToPrimitive(input    ║
║               ║      argument, hint Number).               ║
║               ║   2. Return ToNumber(primValue).           ║
╚═══════════════╩════════════════════════════════════════════╝

ECMAScript Language Specification - ECMA-262 Edition 5.1

1
  • 1
    However note that if the other operand to + is a string, then ToString is called and string concatenation is carried out. So null + "hello" is the string "nullhello".
    – Pointy
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:49
1

Without being type bound,

null == false == 0

null !== false !== 0

http://www.mapbender.org/JavaScript_pitfalls:_null,_false,_undefined,_NaN#0_6

With that said, null == 0, null + 4 = 4

I hope this helps.

5
  • I think it's fair to say: please don't rely on null for standard operations. You'll get away with it in JS but it's really bad practice.
    – aaron-bond
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:38
  • I totally agree, it is strictly a non type bound language pitfall or advantage depending on how you look at it.
    – Churk
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:39
  • Yeah, it likely depends on where you start. If you get to JS from a more structured language, it's terrifying to think of using it that way. If you started with JS, you'd reach a structured language and wonder why you can't do all the useful things!
    – aaron-bond
    Jan 8, 2014 at 16:42
  • While false == 0 with the non-strict equality, neither false nor 0 are equal to null. Have you tried this?
    – Bergi
    Jan 8, 2014 at 17:14
  • The link seems to be broken. Aug 2, 2018 at 14:47

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