77
#!/usr/bin/env node
var _ = require('underscore');
var a = [{f: 1}, {f:5}, {f:10}];
var b = _.clone(a);
b[1].f = 55;
console.log(JSON.stringify(a));

This results in:

[{"f":1},{"f":55},{"f":10}]

Clone does not appear to be working! So I RTFM, and see this:

http://underscorejs.org/#clone

Create a shallow-copied clone of the object. Any nested objects or arrays will be copied by reference, not duplicated.

So _.clone is pretty useless. Is there a way to actually copy the array of objects?

122

Well, there is a trick! If clone does not "clone" nested objects, you can force it to by explicitly cloning each object inside a map call! Like this:

#!/usr/bin/env node
var _ = require('underscore');
var a = [{f: 1}, {f:5}, {f:10}];
var b = _.map(a, _.clone);       // <----
b[1].f = 55;
console.log(JSON.stringify(a));

Prints:

[{"f":1},{"f":5},{"f":10}]

Yay! a is unchanged! I can now edit b to my liking!

  • 46
    Be careful, though. This of course only works two levels deep. not for arrays or objects which are nested even more than this example. – Simon Zyx Feb 12 '15 at 20:31
  • 1
    By design, Underscore also won't clone RegExp or Date values properly – Mark K Cowan May 13 '15 at 8:22
  • 1
    Anyone looking here should see my answer below. – gdibble Jan 31 '17 at 6:27
61

Another solution extracted from the issue on Github that works with any level of nested data, and does not require underscore:

JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj))
  • 12
    This works unless the object has a cycle, in which case JSON.stringify throws an error. Which isn't the case in the original but is still an interesting state of affairs. a = {simple: 'thing'}; a.cycle = a ; JSON.stringify(a). – mcdave Oct 15 '15 at 7:07
  • 9
    Also worth noting this solution only works for objects with simple types. For instance, if you're object has Date or Regex instances, they will be serialized to strings. Not the end of the world, but you need to handle it if you're using this and expect Date instances. – cayleyh Dec 24 '15 at 19:33
  • 1
    And if you think someone might try and feed undefined to this you'll want JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj) || null) otherwise it'll throw an error. – Ian Mackinnon Jun 29 '16 at 16:19
  • 1
    Along with what @cayleyh mentioned, this will drop functions altogether. – Marko Grešak Aug 2 '16 at 15:10
13

FWIW, lodash has a cloneDeep function:

This method is like _.clone except that it recursively clones value.

7

Underscore API reference:

_.toArray(list) Creates a real Array from the list (anything that can be iterated over). Useful for transmuting the arguments object.

...or in this case, cloning an array. Try this:

var _ = require('underscore');
var array1 =  [{a:{b:{c:1}}},{b:{c:{a:2}}},{c:{a:{b:3}}}];
var array2 = _.toArray(array1);
console.log(array1 === array2); --> false
console.log(array1[0] === array2[0]); --> true

The following is an addendum I created after Steve's comment below -thx

A Vanilla JS (or using _.clone if wanted) deep cloning recursive helper:

function clone(thing, opts) {
    var newObject = {};
    if (thing instanceof Array) {
        return thing.map(function (i) { return clone(i, opts); });
    } else if (thing instanceof Date) {
        return new Date(thing);
    } else if (thing instanceof RegExp) {
        return new RegExp(thing);
    } else if (thing instanceof Function) {
        return opts && opts.newFns ?
                   new Function('return ' + thing.toString())() :
                   thing;
    } else if (thing instanceof Object) {
        Object.keys(thing).forEach(function (key) {
            newObject[key] = clone(thing[key], opts);
        });
        return newObject;
    } else if ([ undefined, null ].indexOf(thing) > -1) {
        return thing;
    } else {
        if (thing.constructor.name === 'Symbol') {
            return Symbol(thing.toString()
                       .replace(/^Symbol\(/, '')
                       .slice(0, -1));
        }
        // return _.clone(thing);  // If you must use _ ;)
        return thing.__proto__.constructor(thing);
    }
}

var a = {
    a: undefined,
    b: null,
    c: 'a',
    d: 0,
    e: Symbol('a'),
    f: {},
    g: { a:1 },
    h: [],
    i: [ { a:2 }, { a:3 } ],
    j: [ 1, 2 ],
    k: function (a) { return a; },
    l: /[a-z]/g,
    z: [ {
        a: undefined,
        b: null,
        c: 'b',
        d: 1,
        e: Symbol(1),
        f: {},
        g: { b:2 },
        h: { c:{ c:3 } },
        i: { a:Symbol('b') },
        j: { a:undefined, b:null },
        k: [],
        l: [ 1, [ 1, 2 ], [ [ 1, 2, 3 ] ] ],
        m: function (a) { return !a; },
        n: { a:function (a) { return !!a; } },
        o: /(a|b)/i
       } ]
};
var b = clone(a);
var c = clone(a, { newFns:true });


/* Results - value beneath each for reference:

a.a === b.a --> true
undefined

a.b === b.b --> true
null

a.c === b.c --> true
'a'

a.d === b.d --> true
0

a.e === b.e --> false
Symbol(a)

a.f === b.f --> false
{}

a.g === b.g --> false
{ a:1 }

a.h === b.h --> false
[]

a.i === b.i --> false
[ { a:2 }, { a:3 } ]

a.i[0] === b.i[0] --> false
{ a:2 }

a.i[0].a === b.i[0].a --> true
2

a.j === b.j --> false
[ 1, 2 ]

a.k === b.k --> true
a.k === c.k --> false
function (a) { return a; }

a.l === b.l --> false
/[a-z]/g

a.z === b.z --> false
[Object]

a.z[0].a === b.z[0].a --> true
undefined

a.z[0].b === b.z[0].b --> true
null

a.z[0].c === b.z[0].c --> true
'b'

a.z[0].d === b.z[0].d --> true
1

a.z[0].e === b.z[0].e --> 
false
Symbol(1)

a.z[0].f === b.z[0].f --> false
{}

a.z[0].g === b.z[0].g -- > false
{ b:2 }

a.z[0].g.b === b.z[0].g.b --> true
2

a.z[0].h === b.z[0].h --> false
{ c:{ c:3 } }

a.z[0].h.c === b.z[0].h.c --> false
{ c:3 }

a.z[0].h.c.c === b.z[0].h.c.c --> true
3

a.z[0].i === b.z[0].i --> false
{ a:Symbol(b) }

a.z[0].i.a === b.z[0].i.a --> false
Symbol(b)

a.z[0].j === b.z[0].j --> false
{ a:undefined, b:null }

a.z[0].j.a === b.z[0].j.a --> true
undefined

a.z[0].k === b.z[0].k --> false
[]

a.z[0].l === b.z[0].l --> false
[ 1, [ 1, 2 ], [ [ 1, 2, 3 ] ] ]

a.z[0].l[1] === b.z[0].l[1] --> false
[ 1, 2 ]

a.z[0].l[1][1] === b.z[0].l[1][1] --> true
2

a.z[0].m === b.z[0].m --> true
a.z[0].m === c.z[0].m --> false
function (a) { return !a; }

a.z[0].n === b.z[0].n --> false
{ a:function (a) { return !!a; } }

a.z[0].n.a === b.z[0].n.a --> true
a.z[0].n.a === c.z[0].n.a --> false
function (a) { return !!a; }

a.z[0].o === b.z[0].o --> false
/(a|b)/i

*/
  • This is the best answer. – Pierre Mar 16 '17 at 13:52
  • _.toArray(list) doesn't clone objects in an array. var array1 = [{a: 1}, {a: 2}, {a: 3}]; var array2 = _.toArray(array1); array2[0].a = 999; console.log(array1[0]); --> {a: 999} – Steve Lang May 8 '17 at 5:41
  • @SteveLang thanks for pointing that out. Oops. Therefore I took some time to make the vanilla JS fn above, which if the user really must can use the _.clone in the else condition ;) – gdibble May 10 '17 at 23:04

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.