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I am using ASP.NET MVC5 with C#. I have a form, and after the user fills out the form and clicks Save, I have a RedirectToAction("ThankYou") - which sends them to a "Thank you" page. This is where I want to pause execution for say, 1500 ms. So, the "ThankYou" view will remain on the screen for 1500 milliseconds, then I want to further redirect them back to the form. Here's my View code - very plain, simple, and vanilla:

public ActionResult ThankYou()
{
    return View();
}

What I want to do is something like:

public ActionResult ThankYou()
{
    // pause execution for 1500 milliseconds
    return RedirectToAction("Create");
}

What's the best way to accomplish this, whether it be the way I was thinking or something else?

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    This makes no sense if you think about it (from a server side point of view). Your server side code is done once you call return. You can't return a view.. pause, then return another. This is a client-side task. – Simon Whitehead Jan 8 '14 at 22:19
  • @SimonWhitehead I can send the user to the ThankYou view, then RedirectToAction, can't I? If I remember right, I've done this before. – Mike Marks Jan 8 '14 at 22:22
  • You just might get away with a dirty Thread.Sleep(1500) but that would be horrible judging on what you said you want to accomplish, and it would depend on the browser whether it's: a) frozen stiff and not showing anything; b) frozen stiff and showing whatever was last shown; c) usable but not sending any further HTTP requests. As you can see.. @SimonWhitehead is perfectly right. You should use some sort of javascript delay mechanism (setTimeout maybe) to trigger a refresh or an ajax call. – Eduard Dumitru Jan 8 '14 at 22:22
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    @MikeMarks - once your controller action returns, the HttpContext is gone. Using a Thread.Sleep will simply make the server appear to be taking a little longer than usual, however, you cannot return a view, then return a redirect in the same request. – Tommy Jan 8 '14 at 22:26
  • @MikeMarks That is incorrect. You have a large misunderstanding of how ASP.NET works (or any server-side language). – Simon Whitehead Jan 8 '14 at 22:28
4

If you pause execution on the server side, it will simply appear as though the server is taking 1.5 seconds longer to respond. You need to return the ThankYou view, have the browser wait 1.5 seconds and then redirect the users to the appropriate URL.

There are two ways I can think of to do this:

Javascript Only Solution

<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = function ()
{
    setTimeout(RedirectToUrl, 1500);
}
function RedirectToUrl()
{
    window.location = "/New/Url/";
}
</script>

JQuery Solution

<script type="text/javascript">
   $(function(){
      window.setTimeout(function(){
           window.location = "/New/Url";
       },1500);
   });
</script>

Meta Tag Solution

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="2;url=http://mywebsite.com/New/Url">

I don't think the meta tag takes decimals, though I could be mistaken. The jQuery version is a little quicker and easier, however the meta tag method works on all browsers, even in javascript is disabled.

| improve this answer | |
  • That's not a "Javascript/JQuery" Solution it's a "JQuery Solution" meaning that the "JQuery" part is not optional. It's clear that the asking user is not familiar with these things so if you truly would like to help him, I would suggest you refer to "JQuery" via a link, show how one could include a script tag for "JQuery" and say a few words about why you find it necessary just for implementing a simple setTimeout call at the proper moment in time. Otherwise I would suggest you present the asking user with a simple "Javascript" version of the solution (just to separate concerns) – Eduard Dumitru Jan 8 '14 at 22:27
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    @EduardDumitru - The assumption is that almost every MVC project template comes with jQuery by default. However, point taken, will update with some additional codes. – Tommy Jan 8 '14 at 22:28
  • @Tommy I think that is a perfectly valid assumption. – Simon Whitehead Jan 8 '14 at 22:29
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    There are people in this world who are not using Visual Studio you know :). JQuery is not an essential part of MVC and it's just a fact that people who don't much about what's what and what should be used when are only using those things because a wizard's templates just happen to include those things (the New Project wizard for MVC apps). On the other hand, @Tommy's answer is straightforward and deserves +1 without doubt. I was only trying to point out that whenever possible we should try to enlighten and disambiguate the spaghetti which web development may seem to novices. – Eduard Dumitru Jan 8 '14 at 22:34
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I totally agree with others about the correct solution (a client-side JavaScript or <meta> tag redirect), so take the following just as a side note.

Never block the server thread with Thread.Sleep. If you really need to suspend server-side execution, e.g. to simulate a high-latency network, use asynchronous ASP.NET, e.g.:

public async Task<ActionResult> ThankYou()
{
    await Task.Delay(2000);
    return RedirectToAction("Create");    
}

This can be extended to many other blocking calls, but again, this is not a solution for your scenario.

| improve this answer | |
0

Use a setTimeout call in javascript. That way, your view loads and javascript will call a new url or redirect after 1500 ms.

setTimeout(function(){
    // code to redirect to a new url
}, 1500);

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Window.setTimeout

| improve this answer | |
0

The solution I went with was inside the Create POST action, upon a successful Create request, I simply return the same Create view, but before I do, I add a "Thank you" message to my ViewBag, as follows:

        [HttpPost]
        [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
        public ActionResult Create(string appId, AppFeedback feedback)
        {
            feedback.CreatedDate = DateTime.Now;
            feedback.CreatedBy = HttpContext.User.Identity.Name;

            response = client.PostAsJsonAsync("api/appfeedback", feedback).Result;
            if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
            {
                ViewBag.CustomMessage = "Thank you for submitting feedback!";
                return View("Create", new AppFeedback() { AppId = appId });
            }
            else
            {
                LoggerHelper.GetLogger().InsertError(new Exception(string.Format(
                    "Cannot create a new feedback record due to HTTP Response Status Code not being successful: {0}", response.StatusCode)));
                return View("Problem");
            }
        }

Then, on my Create view, at the very top, I have:

<div class="content" style="margin-left:30px;">
        @if (ViewBag.CustomMessage != null)
        {
            <div>@ViewBag.CustomMessage</div>
        }
...

This doesn't really answer my specific question - I decided to go a different route. So when the user submits their form, they then see the same form again with a "Thank you" message at the very top.

| improve this answer | |

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