65

I have a list that countain values, one of the values I got is 'nan'

countries= [nan, 'USA', 'UK', 'France']

I tried to remove it, but I everytime get an error

cleanedList = [x for x in countries if (math.isnan(x) == True)]
TypeError: a float is required

When I tried this one :

cleanedList = cities[np.logical_not(np.isnan(countries))]
cleanedList = cities[~np.isnan(countries)]

TypeError: ufunc 'isnan' not supported for the input types, and the inputs could not be safely coerced to any supported types according to the casting rule ''safe''
  • 4
    That looks like the string "nan", not an actual NaN value. – BrenBarn Jan 9 '14 at 4:49
  • 1
    yes, it is a string. [x for x in countries if x != 'nan'] – MarshalSHI Jan 9 '14 at 4:52
  • 3
    if condition == True is unnecessary, you can always just do if condition. – reem Jan 9 '14 at 5:35
  • No solution provided so far are not satisfying. I have the same problem. Basically, it does not work for strings. Therefore in your case np.isnan('USA') will send the same error message. If I find some solution I will upload it. – Yohan Obadia Jan 26 '17 at 12:52
90

The question has changed, so to has the answer:

Strings can't be tested using math.isnan as this expects a float argument. In your countries list, you have floats and strings.

In your case the following should suffice:

cleanedList = [x for x in countries if str(x) != 'nan']

Old answer

In your countries list, the literal 'nan' is a string not the Python float nan which is equivalent to:

float('NaN')

In your case the following should suffice:

cleanedList = [x for x in countries if x != 'nan']
  • 1
    Logically, what you say is true. But it didn't work out with me. – user3001937 Jan 9 '14 at 5:02
  • Then the problem is in another area, the array you gave is strings which math.isnan will naturall through errors with. – user764357 Jan 9 '14 at 5:06
  • Yes ! when I print the output, I got this : [nan, 'USA', 'UK', 'France'] – user3001937 Jan 9 '14 at 5:07
  • 1
    @user3001937 I've updated the answer based on the new information – user764357 Jan 9 '14 at 5:15
  • 2
    zhangxaochen: it is not a string, it is a float. Look carefully at the updated answer; Lego Stormtroopr's converting x to a string so you can compare it. nan always returns false for ==, even when compared to nan, so that's the easiest way to compare it. – Chad Miller Jan 9 '14 at 6:30
13

The problem comes from the fact that np.isnan() does not handle string values correctly. For example, if you do:

np.isnan("A")
TypeError: ufunc 'isnan' not supported for the input types, and the inputs could not be safely coerced to any supported types according to the casting rule ''safe''

However the pandas version pd.isnull() works for numeric and string values:

pd.isnull("A")
> False

pd.isnull(3)
> False

pd.isnull(np.nan)
> True

pd.isnull(None)
> True
11
import numpy as np

mylist = [3, 4, 5, np.nan]
l = [x for x in mylist if ~np.isnan(x)]

This should remove all NaN. Of course, I assume that it is not a string here but actual NaN (np.nan).

  • 1
    This gives me error: TypeError: ufunc 'isnan' not supported for the input types, and the inputs could not be safely coerced to any supported types according to the casting rule ''safe'' – Zak Keirn Jan 9 at 23:46
  • Why not simply: x[~ np.isnan(x)] ? No list comprehension needed in numpy. Of course, I assume x is a numpy array. – bue May 29 at 3:18
  • I assumed x is not going to be a numpy array as the question suggested. – Ajay Shah May 29 at 5:41
5

use numpy fancy indexing:

In [29]: countries=np.asarray(countries)

In [30]: countries[countries!='nan']
Out[30]: 
array(['USA', 'UK', 'France'], 
      dtype='|S6')
5

Using your example where...

countries= [nan, 'USA', 'UK', 'France']

Since nan is not equal to nan (nan != nan) and countries[0] = nan, you should observe the following:

countries[0] == countries[0]
False

However,

countries[1] == countries[1]
True
countries[2] == countries[2]
True
countries[3] == countries[3]
True

Therefore, the following should work:

cleanedList = [x for x in countries if x == x]
  • 1
    This is the only answer that works when you have a float('nan') in a list of strings – kmundnic Jun 15 at 21:56
3

if you check for the element type

type(countries[1])

the result will be <class float> so you can use the following code:

[i for i in countries if type(i) is not float]
1

In your example 'nan' is a string so instead of using isnan() just check for the string

like this:

cleanedList = [x for x in countries if x != 'nan']
-1

I noticed that Pandas for example will return 'nan' for blank values. Since it's not a string you need to convert it to one in order to match it. For example:

ulist = df.column1.unique() #create a list from a column with Pandas which 
for loc in ulist:
    loc = str(loc)   #here 'nan' is converted to a string to compare with if
    if loc != 'nan':
        print(loc)

protected by Sheldore Jul 12 at 14:45

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