I am trying to setup a diskless client which will mount over nfs to the server. When I try to boot the client I get the following error message:

VFS: Cannot open root device "nfs" or unknown-block(0,255) Please append a correct "root=" boot option Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block(0,255)

I've set up my kernel parameters as follows:

kernel=192.79.143.131:/linuxboot,192.168.100.14 <-- tftpboot parameters....(which works)

Linux PPC load: root=/dev/nfs rw nfsroot=192.79.143.131:/diskless/client01 ip=dhcp

The kernel is found via tftpboot, so I know the 'kernel' parameter above works. The kernel is loaded and start executing, but hits the above error eventually.

The mount point is properly exported from the server, as I can mount it manually from other machines.

I've read several threads about this topic (at least very similar), but none, as far as I've seen so far, has addressed mounting a nfs drive. I've only seen topics talking about local hard drives.

Any ideas,guidance is very appreciated...thanks...

closed as off-topic by Paul Roub, rene, thanksd, jkucharovic, DeanOC Aug 7 '17 at 21:15

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I had similar problem, my kernel config needed this:

  • Root file system on NFS (CONFIG_ROOT_NFS).

Topic on Gentoo forums

I believe you aren't loading "initrd.img".

Your kernel parameters have "kernel=192.79.143.131:/linuxboot,192.168.100.14". You need to add a line, and it should look something like this :

kernel=192.79.143.131:/linuxboot,192.168.100.14

append initrd=initrd.img.

You can get the initrd.img after downloading the Base rootfs by using the command

yum groupinstall base.

  • initrd isn't mandatory, you can boot a kernel without usingit. – binarym Nov 9 '16 at 18:05

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