7

This question already has an answer here:

This seems like a simple sort, yet JavaScript is giving an incorrect result.

Am I doing something wrong or is this a language quirk?

[5, 10, 1].sort();

[ 1, 10, 5 ]

marked as duplicate by Bergi, adeneo, George, Tibos, T.J. Crowder Jan 9 '14 at 12:16

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23

Javascript sorts alphabetically. This means that "10" is lower than "5", because "1" is lower than "5".

To sort numerical values you need to pass in numerical comparator like this:

function sorter(a, b) {
  if (a < b) return -1;  // any negative number works
  if (a > b) return 1;   // any positive number works
  return 0; // equal values MUST yield zero
}

[1,10, 5].sort(sorter);

Or you can cheat by passing simpler function:

function sorter(a, b){
  return a - b;
}

[1, 10, 5].sort(sorter);

Logic behind this shorter function is that comparator must return x>0 if a > b, x<0 if a < b and zero if a is equal to b. So in case you have

a=1 b=5
a-b will yield negative(-4) number meaning b is larger than a

a=5 b=1
a-b will yield positive number(4) meaning a is larger than b

a=3 b=3
a-b will yield 0 meaning they are equal
  • This is WAY too much code! – Kelly J Andrews Jan 9 '14 at 12:17
  • @KellyJAndrews where ? Second approach is widely used. Of course you can inline it directly and minify if you prefer size > readability – lukas.pukenis Jan 9 '14 at 12:19
  • I did my example in one line, The smallest you are using is 3. – Kelly J Andrews Jan 9 '14 at 12:21
  • 4
    @KellyJAndrews talking about reusability if you use yoursort 5 times, my code will beat yours by readability, reusability, DRY approach and if you're not happy with my approach, simply delete two newlines – lukas.pukenis Jan 9 '14 at 12:23
  • 1
    This code can be shortened using an Arrow Function. numberArray.sort((a, b) => (a - b)); Note: check if your JS engine supports Arrow Functions. – Константин Ван Dec 28 '15 at 9:49
4

You have to pass a function to the sort method.

var points = [5, 10, 1];
points.sort(function(a,b){return a-b});

Here is a working fiddle.

  • Also - this is the W3C schools details about this. – Kelly J Andrews Jan 9 '14 at 12:16
  • W3C schools is a bad reference – Jacob Jan 9 '14 at 12:30
  • 3
    It gets a bad rap, but I think for the simple basics, it's accurate. – Kelly J Andrews Jan 9 '14 at 12:31
0

Default sort order is alphabetic and ascending. If you want to sort the number you could do something like this:

function sortNumber(a,b) {
    return a - b;
}

var numArray = [140000, 104, 99];
numArray.sort(sortNumber);
0
function sortit(a, b){ return (a-b); }
[1, 5, 10].sort(sortit);
0

You may try:

[5, 10, 1].sort(function(a, b){ return a - b })   # print [1, 5, 10]
0

you can try

[5, 10, 1].sort(function(a,b){return a-b})

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