34

What is the right way to initialize char** ? I get coverity error - Uninitialized pointer read (UNINIT) when trying:

char **values = NULL;

or

char **values = { NULL };
5
  • 1
    That's fine for initializing them to be no strings at all; you will still need to point them somewhere valid before you use them (using malloc or similar). – tabstop Jan 9 '14 at 15:02
  • Linux r-mgtswh-130 2.6.18-348.el5 #1 SMP Tue Jan 8 17:53:53 EST 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux – Lior Avramov Jan 9 '14 at 15:03
  • 1
    This compiles using gcc. Are you saying this doesn't compile for you, or that you're getting an error when you run your program? – Keeler Jan 9 '14 at 15:14
  • char ** values is a pointer to a pointer to char, nothing more. values is no array of "strings". – alk Jan 9 '14 at 15:46
  • is there a problem to do char *values[] = to allocate the array on stack? – V-X Jan 9 '14 at 16:14
61

This example program illustrates initialization of an array of C strings.

#include <stdio.h>

const char * array[] = {
    "First entry",
    "Second entry",
    "Third entry",
};

#define n_array (sizeof (array) / sizeof (const char *))

int main ()
{
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < n_array; i++) {
        printf ("%d: %s\n", i, array[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

It prints out the following:

0: First entry
1: Second entry
2: Third entry
2
  • Hi, it works! But i have a question, why i have to use #define n_array here? I have tried with: int n_array, and my app crashes, i'm new to C and dont understand this behavior - #define instead of simple variable int. Thanks. – andymcgregor Nov 25 '17 at 9:38
  • @teMkaa Using #define is just a question of style; personally I wouldn't have done it. Within the main function you could easily define another int variable and assign it to sizeof (array) / sizeof (const char *). – Duncan Jones Apr 20 '18 at 7:20
13

Its fine to just do char **strings;, char **strings = NULL, or char **strings = {NULL}

but to initialize it you'd have to use malloc:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(){
    // allocate space for 5 pointers to strings
    char **strings = (char**)malloc(5*sizeof(char*));
    int i = 0;
    //allocate space for each string
    // here allocate 50 bytes, which is more than enough for the strings
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++){
        printf("%d\n", i);
        strings[i] = (char*)malloc(50*sizeof(char));
    }
    //assign them all something
    sprintf(strings[0], "bird goes tweet");
    sprintf(strings[1], "mouse goes squeak");
    sprintf(strings[2], "cow goes moo");
    sprintf(strings[3], "frog goes croak");
    sprintf(strings[4], "what does the fox say?");
    // Print it out
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++){
        printf("Line #%d(length: %lu): %s\n", i, strlen(strings[i]),strings[i]);
    } 
    //Free each string
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++){
        free(strings[i]);
    }
    //finally release the first string
    free(strings);
    return 0;
}
3
  • 3
    (I'd expext some c-grammar nazzi commenting about the typecast before malloc) – V-X Jan 9 '14 at 15:28
  • I guess it's just habit from writing C++ and having to do that – Nick Beeuwsaert Jan 9 '14 at 15:49
  • Thank you so much. It help me a lot. – ToanVnET May 26 '20 at 9:19
9

There is no right way, but you can initialize an array of literals:

char **values = (char *[]){"a", "b", "c"};

or you can allocate each and initialize it:

char **values = malloc(sizeof(char*) * s);
for(...)
{
    values[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * l);
    //or
    values[i] = "hello";
}
2
  • using malloc() is the way to go – Brian Tracy Jan 9 '14 at 15:13
  • I get compiler error taking address of temporary array when trying to compile char **values = (char *[]){"a", "b", "c"}; ... char *values[] = {"a", "b", "c"}; works however – Sebastian Jul 3 '20 at 13:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.