3

Okay I have been attempting to find the best way to evenly space li menu items horizontally for a variable amount of menu items. I have found that applying text-align:justify to the containing div, display:inline to the ul, display:inline-block to the li, and adding a span after the ul with a width:100%,display:inline-block,height:0 will generate the desired effect. However, there is a lot of inexplicable extra space under the ul. After many hours of headaches I figured out that it appears only in an html file with an HTML 5 Doctype. If it has the old XHTML Transitional Doctype it displays exactly as expected. My question is, why is this extra space there and how do I get rid of it?

Here's the markup I've been toying with:


    body{
        margin:0;
        padding:0;  
    }
    .nav{
        width:900px;
        margin:0 auto;
        position:relative;
        text-align:justify;
        background-color:#666;
        font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    }
    .nav ul{
        display:inline;
        width:100%;
        padding:0;
        margin:0;
        list-style:none; 
     }
     .nav li{
        display:inline-block;
        font-size:1.2em;
     }
     .nav li a{
        display:inline-block;
        color:#FFF;
        text-decoration:none;
        padding:10px;
     }
     span{
        display: inline-block;
        width: 100%;
        height: 0;
        color:#F00;
     }

<div class="nav">
<ul>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a></li>
<li> <a href="">tex</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">text</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">text</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttext</a> </li>
</ul>
<span></span>
</div>

jsfiddle

  • The span is unnecessary for styling this list. Try it the way I listed below. It looks great! ;) link – bboysupaman Jan 9 '14 at 20:32
1

Add line-height:0 to the div with class nav, line-height:1.2 to the ul and vertical-align:top to the span.

Also consider replacing the span with a .nav:after pseudo-element.

Like this: http://jsfiddle.net/frhxS/13/

The principle behind the changes is to remove the effect of the strut on the two line boxes. The strut has no effect on the height of the line boxes when using XHTML 1.0 Transitional doctype or the HTML 4.01 Transitional doctype but does set a minimum height for the line boxes when used with either the HTML5 doctype or the XHTML 1.0 Strict or HTML 4.01 Strict doctypes.

  • Beautiful. Thanks! – DaveDavidD Jan 10 '14 at 13:15
  • Hi, do you know why there is an area at the bottom of the grey bar that is unclickable, when it should be? It happens in latest Chrome for Windows (39.0.2171.71 m) but doesn't happen for latest Firefox for Windows (33.1.1) nor IE 10 (appears to be okay in browser mode for IE 8 and 9, too.) I solved it with making the anchors position: relative; but I'd prefer to know why it's happening, than just the hack to fix it. – Ming Nov 26 '14 at 0:41
  • @setek - Good question. To the best of my knowledge neither HTML or CSS precisely defines the click area of anchor elements. But the line box of the :after pseudo-element is overlaying the line box of the ul in Chrome for the area that isn't clickable. (the line-height is 0, but the glyphs extend outside that line height). One fix is to set the font-size of the nav element to 0 and give the ul a font-size in pixels. Then the glyphs as well as the line-height in the pseudo-element will be 0 height. position:relative is probably changing the paint order, to bring the anchor text to the top. – Alohci Nov 26 '14 at 1:24
  • Hmm interesting, thanks for that :) I don't like giving things a font-size too small, I know Safari has an "ignore font sizes smaller than 9pt" setting, so I don't like relying on it to work .. I'll just fudge the look with the position: relative; lol ... thanks! – Ming Nov 26 '14 at 2:25
0

did you try:

 .nav ul{
    display:inline;
    width:100%;
    padding:0;
    margin:0;
    list-style:none; 
 }

instead of:

 .nav>ul{
    display:inline;
    width:100%;
    padding:0;
    margin:0;
    list-style:none; 
 }
0

Try setting the width property of the li to 12% and getting rid of the span element.

body{
        margin:0;
        padding:0;  
    }
    .nav{
        width:900px;
        margin:0 auto;
        position:relative;
        text-align:justify;
        background-color:#666;
        white-space:no-wrap;
        font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
    }
    .nav>ul{
        display:inline;
        width:100%;
        padding:0;
        margin:0;
        list-style:none; 
     }
     .nav li{
    display:inline-block;
    font-size:1.2em;
    width: 12%;
    text-align:center;
 }
     .nav li a{
        display:inline-block;
        color:#FFF;
        text-decoration:none;
        padding:10px;
     }

and

<div class="nav">
<ul>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a></li>
<li> <a href="">tex</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">text</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">text</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttexttext</a> </li>
<li> <a href="">texttext</a> </li>
</ul>
</div>
  • I tried your suggestion but this ends up creating uneven spacing between the elements. – DaveDavidD Jan 9 '14 at 20:35
  • Plus I'm trying to create a solution that does not require a manual or scripted recalculation each time and item is added or deleted. Thanks for your suggestion! – DaveDavidD Jan 9 '14 at 20:40
  • This is not possible without the use of Javascript. You will always have to recalculate if you want to get a good looking list, unless you use the flex-box property. However, That will require a javascript plugin if you want to have backwards compatibility with older browsers. – bboysupaman Jan 9 '14 at 20:44
  • Let me ask you this, if you take the code I posted above and put it in an editor or run it in a browser with the XHTML 4 Transitional doctype does it display correctly without the extra space at the bottom? and not work for the HTML 5 Doctype? – DaveDavidD Jan 9 '14 at 20:48
  • You are correct. The reason is that you are using the span to assist with the layout styling and that is not the purpose of the span element. Anytime you are using an element for its unintended purpose, you run the risk of compatibility issues with other browsers or standard versions. – bboysupaman Jan 9 '14 at 20:53
0

.nav{ white-space:nowrap; } not white-space:no-wrap. This will fix your problem

  • Oops, good eye but with the nowarp woking it actually breaks the justify. I removed it from the above code since it breaks it and I removed it on my local machine. Thanks – DaveDavidD Jan 9 '14 at 20:36
  • @DaveDavidD no it doesnt. The span does :) remove the span and everything is ok – n1kkou Jan 9 '14 at 20:38
  • If I remove the span the items will not stretch the full width of the container. – DaveDavidD Jan 9 '14 at 20:49

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