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I am attempting to figure out what

 >> 3 

does in the code shown below. Is >> a redirect and if so, then what is 3? Can someone help?

#define BYTESIZE(bitsize)       ((bitsize + 7) >> 3)
  • As an aside, the other meaning of >> is called the "extraction operator," not "redirect." Perhaps you were thinking of shell syntax, where > redirects output to a file. – Brian A. Henning Jan 9 '14 at 21:13
  • @Lotharyx: In shell syntax, >> appends to a file (which has nothing to do with the C operator that happens to look similar). – Keith Thompson Jan 9 '14 at 21:15
  • You're right. > by itself overwrites the file. I was just trying to correct the OP's jargon. :-) – Brian A. Henning Jan 9 '14 at 21:16
  • BTW, the macro definition should parenthesize its arguments to avoid operator precedence problems: #define BYTESIZE(bitsize) (((bitsize) + 7) >> 3) – Keith Thompson Jan 9 '14 at 21:16
  • I added the bit-shift tag. @user2936723 I realize you did not know this is what it is but it is the relevant category. – Radiodef Jan 9 '14 at 21:16
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>> is the right shift operator. Right-shift takes a binary value and shifts it right by the right-hand operand. For example:

0100 >> 1 == 0010
00010000 >> 4 == 00000001

In decimal terms, this is the same as dividing by powers of two. >> 1 divides by two, >> 2 divides by four, >> 3 divides by 8, etc.

  • 3
    The + 7 part is actually interesting too: effectively it rounds up to the nearest multiple of 8. So for example BYTESIZE(14) returns 2. – Radiodef Jan 9 '14 at 21:13
  • It's a pretty clever macro, but the OP was only asking about >>. (-: – Brian A. Henning Jan 9 '14 at 21:13
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    Yep! Just an addendum. – Radiodef Jan 9 '14 at 21:20
  • Nothing especially "clever" about the +7 thing -- it's an old, very well-established idiom. – Hot Licks Jan 9 '14 at 22:00
  • @HotLicks I know that, I'm just being polite to Radiodef, as I thought it was worth mentioning. – Cloud Jan 9 '14 at 22:24

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