8

Unfortunately, as of 0.9.5, TypeScript doesn't (yet) have algebraic data types (union types) and pattern matching (to destructure them). What's more, it doesn't even support instanceof on interfaces. Which pattern do you use to emulate these language features with maximal type safety and minimal boilerplate code?

6

I went with the following Visitor-like pattern, inspired by this and this (in the example, a Choice can be Foo or Bar):

interface Choice {
    match<T>(cases: ChoiceCases<T>): T;
}

interface ChoiceCases<T> {
    foo(foo: Foo): T;
    bar(bar: Bar): T;
}

class Foo implements Choice {

    match<T>(cases: ChoiceCases<T>): T {
        return cases.foo(this);
    }

}

class Bar implements Choice {

    match<T>(cases: ChoiceCases<T>): T {
        return cases.bar(this);
    }

}

Usage:

function getName(choice: Choice): string {
    return choice.match({
        foo: foo => "Foo",
        bar: bar => "Bar",
    });
}

The matching itself is expressive and type-safe, but there's lot of boilerplate to write for the types.

  • Maybe you can use sweetjs to create a macro for 'match' and wrap around multiple types of Choice so you have type-checking but the actual implementation would be provided by the macro. – Johnny Everson Jul 11 '14 at 14:57
4

TypeScript 1.4 adds union types and type guards.

2

To answer

it doesn't even support instanceof on interfaces.

Reason is type erasure. Interfaces are a compile type construct only and don't have any runtime implications. However you can use instanceof on classes e.g. :

class Foo{}
var x = new Foo();
console.log(x instanceof Foo); // true
  • 3
    Thank you for this insight, it is interesting, but it doesn't answer the question itself, so I suggest converting it to a comment instead. – thSoft Jan 10 '14 at 14:32
2

Example to illustrate the accepted answer:

enum ActionType { AddItem, RemoveItem, UpdateItem }
type Action =
    {type: ActionType.AddItem, content: string} |
    {type: ActionType.RemoveItem, index: number} |
    {type: ActionType.UpdateItem, index: number, content: string}

function dispatch(action: Action) {
    switch(action.type) {
    case ActionType.AddItem:
        // now TypeScript knows that "action" has only "content" but not "index"
        console.log(action.content);
        break;
    case ActionType.RemoveItem:
        // now TypeScript knows that "action" has only "index" but not "content"
        console.log(action.index);
        break;
    default:
    }
}
1

Here's an alternative to the very good answer by @thSoft. On the plus side, this alternative

  1. has potential interoperability with raw javascript objects on the form { type : string } & T, where the shape of T depends on the value of type,
  2. has substantially less per-choice boilerplate;

on the negative side

  1. does not enforce statically that you match all cases,
  2. does not distinguish between different ADTs.

It looks like this:

// One-time boilerplate, used by all cases. 

interface Maybe<T> { value : T }
interface Matcher<T> { (union : Union) : Maybe<T> }

interface Union { type : string }

class Case<T> {
  name : string;
  constructor(name: string) {
    this.name = name;
  }
  _ = (data: T) => ( <Union>({ type : this.name, data : data }) )
  $ =
    <U>(f:(t:T) => U) => (union : Union) =>
        union.type === this.name
          ? { value : f((<any>union).data) }
          : null
}

function match<T>(union : Union, destructors : Matcher<T> [], t : T = null)
{
  for (const destructor of destructors) {
    const option = destructor(union);
    if (option)
      return option.value;
  }
  return t;
}

function any<T>(f:() => T) : Matcher<T> {
  return x => ({ value : f() });
}

// Usage. Define cases.

const A = new Case<number>("A");
const B = new Case<string>("B");

// Construct values.

const a = A._(0);
const b = B._("foo");

// Destruct values.

function f(union : Union) {
  match(union, [
    A.$(x => console.log(`A : ${x}`))
  , B.$(y => console.log(`B : ${y}`))
  , any (() => console.log(`default case`))
  ])
}

f(a);
f(b);
f(<any>{});

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