10

Is there a difference between defining member functions for a template class inside the class declaration versus outside?

Defined inside:

template <typename T>
class A
{
public:
    void method()
    {
        //...
    }
};

Defined outside:

template <typename T>
class B
{
public:
    void method();
};

template <typename T>
void B<T>::method()
{
    //...
}

For non-template classes, this is the difference between inlined and non-inlined methods. Is this also true for template classes?

The default for most of my colleagues is to provide definitions inside the class, but I've always preferred definitions outside the class. Is my preference justified?

Edit: Please assume all the above code is provided in the header file for the class.

  • I've never seen a reference anywhere that indicates that defining a method body inside the class declaration makes that method inline. Have I been missing something? – Dathan Jan 20 '10 at 17:53
  • 4
    @Dathan: You've been missing §9.3/2 of the C++ standard, which says: "A member function may be defined (8.4) in its class definition, in which case it is an inline member function ..." Edit: Also note that this is a class definition -- a class declaration is something like: class x; – Jerry Coffin Jan 20 '10 at 17:58
  • Thanks for the clarification. (c: – Dathan Jan 20 '10 at 18:05
  • We seem to have two conflicting answers, but the discussion surrounding them leads me to believe that the two methods are essentially technically equivalent. – Ben Jan 22 '10 at 23:34
4

Yes, the exact same is true for template classes.

The reason why method definitions for template classes are usually preferred to be inline is that with templates, the entire definition must be visible when the template is instantiated.

So if you put the function definition in some separate .cpp file, you'll get a linker error. The only general solution is to make the function inline, either by defining it inside the class or outside with the inline keyword. but in either cases, it must be visible anywhere the function is called, which means it must typically be in the same header as the class definition.

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  • Just out of curiosity, is the linker error universally true now? I know in the past some compilers provided different template instantiation options. The SGI Irix CC compiler, for example, defaulted to link-time instantiation and actually seemed to encourage putting template function definitions in their own .cpp file (i.e., not in header, non-inlined, not visible to calling code, just like any other non-inline function definition). Just wondering if inline template function definition has changed from being a compiler preference to a requirement of the language. – Darryl Jan 20 '10 at 18:37
  • @Darryl, you're describing extern templates. It's a non-standard extension, and not all compilers support it. The new standard, C++1x, is adding extern templates, though I believe it requires the keyword. – greyfade Jan 20 '10 at 18:49
  • Templates are compiled at each and every compilation unit that uses that particular instantiation, but they are 'weak' symbols (gcc terminology, I don't know how standard that is) and having the same symbol defined in more than one compilation unit will not be a link error. So there is no need to add the inline to template functions/methods. Another remark is that inline is a hint to the compiler, but it can be disregarded by the compiler (but it will affect how the symbols are created so that the linker won't complain about a double definition). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 20 '10 at 19:45
2

There's no difference, aside from having to type more. That includes the template bit, the inline and having to use more "elaborate" names when referring to the class. For example

template <typename T> class A { 
  A method(A a) { 
    // whatever
  } 
}; 

template <typename T> inline A<T> A<T>::method(A a) { 
  // whatever
} 

Note that when the method is defined inside you can always omit the template parameter list <T> when referring to A<T> and just use A. When defining it outside, you have to use the "full" name in the return type and in the name of the method (but not in the parameter list).

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  • You're making "method" inline in both cases, which could be bad if the function body is large. That's what I'm trying to avoid. – Ben Jan 20 '10 at 18:14
  • 3
    The inline keyword has less to do with actually optimizing code, and more with whether multiple definitions of the same function are allowed or not. If a function is defined in a header (which is unavoidable with templates, or the case when a function is defined within a class declaration), and multiple compilation units include that, the linker will finally end up with multiple (identical) definitions of the same function/method. The inline keyword (which should be implicit with templates) tells the linker that it is OK, otherwise it would be a linker error. – UncleBens Jan 20 '10 at 18:22
  • The point is Ben that with a template you don't have any choice. It has to be marked inline or the template will not work. This is one reason some people dislike templates. Its also worth noting that the compiler doesn't actually HAVE to inline the thing it can do whatever it likes behind your back. – Goz Jan 20 '10 at 18:23
  • 2
    @Ben: I'm making it inline in order to obtain to equivalent declarations/definitions and thus better illustrate the fact that you need to type more in order to achive the same effect. If what you are trying to do is to obtain a non-inline method, you have no choice but to use the out-of-class definition. In that case, I don't understand why you are even considering (asking about) the in-class definition. – AnT Jan 20 '10 at 18:38
  • @Goz: Why does it have to be marked inline? No, it doesn't. The only reason I marked it inline is to make both declarations equivalent. – AnT Jan 20 '10 at 18:45
0

I know this..I think it must be some what help full to u?

defining a member function outside of its template

It is not ok to provide the definition of a member function of a template class like this:

 // This might be in a header file:
 template <typename T>
 class xyz {
    void foo();
  };

// ...

 // This might be later on in the header file:
  void xyz<T>::foo() {
// generic definition of foo()
   }

This is wrong for a few reasons. So is this:

      void xyz<class T>::foo() {
         // generic definition of foo()
      }

The proper definition needs the template keyword and the same template arguments that the class template's definition was declared with. So that gives:

       template <typename T>
          void xyz<T>::foo() {
           // generic definition of foo()
                 }

Note that there are other types of template directives, such as member templates, etc., and each takes on their own form. What's important is to know which you have so you know how to write each flavor. This is so especially since the error messages of some compilers may not be clear as to what is wrong. And of course, get a good and up to date book.

If you have a nested member template within a template:

    template <typename T>
      struct xyz {
      // ...
      template <typename U>
       struct abc;
        // ...
       };

How do you define abc outside of xyz? This does not work:

     template <typename U>
    struct xyz::abc<U> { // Nope
      // ...
  };

nor does this:

 template <typename T, typename U>
 struct xyz<T>::abc<U> { // Nope
// ...
 };

You would have to do this:

     template <typename T>
       template <typename U>
           struct xyz<T>::abc {
            // ...
           };

Note that it's ...abc not ...abc<U> because abc is a "primary" template. IOWs, this is not good:

// not allowed here: template template struct xyz::abc { };

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