6

This part of code is rejected by pmd in sonar:

public String getFoo() {
    String foo = System.getProperty("foo");

    if (foo == null) {
        foo = System.getenv("foo");
    } else if (foo == null) {
        foo = "defaultFoo";
    }

    return foo;
}

It says "Avoid Literals In If Condition". Can someone tell me what's wrong with this or what this rule try to effect?

4
  • 1
    btw the second if is absolutely useless since you are trying to check something that was checked before
    – ITroubs
    Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:08
  • 1
    Avoid using hard coded literals in conditional statements, declare those as static variables or private members.
    – Kick
    Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:10
  • 1
    I edited the question and removed unsed part, bacause the answers are all focused to wrong part Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:14
  • Now also you are facing same reject ? If yes then create the static variable assigning null and then compare in if condition
    – Kick
    Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:18

2 Answers 2

6

Why don't you use:

public String getFoo() {
    String foo = System.getProperty("foo", "defaultFoo");

    return foo;
}

It will return "defaultFoo" if no property is found.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#getProperty(java.lang.String, java.lang.String)

1
  • 1
    The question was focusing to reason why pmd rule dosen't compliant. But +1 becasue this is also good idea. Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:34
4

What does Sonar try to say is that you should avoid hardcoded literals (like null) in the if condition.

Suppose the following example:

Let's say we have this if statement, for which Sonar warns with Avoid Literals In If Condition:

if (i == 5) { 
    //do something
}

By declaring the hardcoded literal as (final) variable with descriptive names maintainability is enhanced:

final int FIVE = 5;
if (i == FIVE) {
    //do something
}

and Sonar doesn't warn anymore.

7
  • How to declarate null as final variable? Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:19
  • How about final Object NULL = null; ? Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:19
  • 3
    Yes, this is the reason. But in this case I think I'll remove this rule. Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:28
  • 5
    @kocko That seems like a mad thing to do, the same as final int FIVE = 5;, it gains you nothing but "inner platform effect". Coding it as final int TARGETVALUE= 5; would be more useful though Commented Jan 10, 2014 at 13:33
  • 3
    This is the reason why some people hate static code analysis tools. I don't. But they do require configuration and customization in order to really help. Here, you could either limit yourself to magic numbers and use Checkstyle's MagicNumber check instead, or exclude null and other useful literals from this check.
    – barfuin
    Commented Jan 11, 2014 at 12:41

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