foreach ($computer in $computerlist) {
    if((Test-Connection -Cn $computer -BufferSize 16 -Count 1 -ea 0 -quiet))
    {
        foreach ($file in $REMOVE) {
            Remove-Item "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\$file" -Recurse
            Copy-Item E:\Code\powershell\shortcuts\* "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\"            
        }
    } else {
        Write-Host "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\"
    }
}

I want to export Write-Host "\$computer\$DESTINATION\" to the CSV files so I know which computers were offline when the script ran.

I am running this from a Windows 7 machine

up vote 26 down vote accepted

This solution creates a psobject and adds each object to an array, it then creates the csv by piping the contents of the array through Export-CSV.

$results = @()
foreach ($computer in $computerlist) {
    if((Test-Connection -Cn $computer -BufferSize 16 -Count 1 -ea 0 -quiet))
    {
        foreach ($file in $REMOVE) {
            Remove-Item "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\$file" -Recurse
            Copy-Item E:\Code\powershell\shortcuts\* "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\"            
        }
    } else {

        $details = @{            
                Date             = get-date              
                ComputerName     = $Computer                 
                Destination      = $Destination 
        }                           
        $results += New-Object PSObject -Property $details  
    }
}
$results | export-csv -Path c:\temp\so.csv -NoTypeInformation

If you pipe a string object to a csv you will get its length written to the csv, this is because these are properties of the string, See here for more information.

This is why I create a new object first.

Try the following:

write-output "test" | convertto-csv -NoTypeInformation

This will give you:

"Length"
"4"

If you use the Get-Member on Write-Output as follows:

write-output "test" | Get-Member -MemberType Property

You will see that it has one property - 'length':

   TypeName: System.String

Name   MemberType Definition
----   ---------- ----------
Length Property   System.Int32 Length {get;}

This is why Length will be written to the csv file.


Update: Appending a CSV Not the most efficient way if the file gets large...

$csvFileName = "c:\temp\so.csv"
$results = @()
if (Test-Path $csvFileName)
{
    $results += Import-Csv -Path $csvFileName
}
foreach ($computer in $computerlist) {
    if((Test-Connection -Cn $computer -BufferSize 16 -Count 1 -ea 0 -quiet))
    {
        foreach ($file in $REMOVE) {
            Remove-Item "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\$file" -Recurse
            Copy-Item E:\Code\powershell\shortcuts\* "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\"            
        }
    } else {

        $details = @{            
                Date             = get-date              
                ComputerName     = $Computer                 
                Destination      = $Destination 
        }                           
        $results += New-Object PSObject -Property $details  
    }
}
$results | export-csv -Path $csvFileName -NoTypeInformation
  • anyway to Append the file instead of overwrite? I tried the -NoClobber flag but didn't seem to help – software is fun Jan 10 '14 at 15:29
  • 2
    As a minor improvement, you can use $details = [ordered] @{... This will make sure the columns in the csv file appear in the same order as specified. – vmb100 Jan 10 '17 at 16:16

what you are searching for is the Export-Csv file.csv

try using Get-Help Export-Csv to see whats possible

also Out-File -FilePath "file.csv" will work

  • I tried that already but my file is created with no data.Write-Host "\\$computer\$DESTINATION\" | Export-Csv E:\Code\powershell\logs\offline.txt – software is fun Jan 10 '14 at 14:55
  • 5
    Don't use Write-Host. Use Write-Output. Write-Host does not go to the pipe. – EBGreen Jan 10 '14 at 15:01

simply use the Out-File cmd but DON'T forget to give an encoding type: -Encoding UTF8

so use it so:

$log | Out-File -Append C:\as\whatever.csv -Encoding UTF8

-Append is required if you want to write in the file more then once.

You can always use the

echo "Column1`tColumn2`tColumn3..." >> results.csv

You will need to put "`t" between the columns to separates the variables into their own column. Here is the way I wrote my script:

echo "Host`tState" >> results.csv
$names = Get-Content "hostlist.txt"
foreach ($name in $names) {
    $count = 0
    $count2 = 13490

    if ( Test-Connection -ComputerName $name -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) {
        echo "$name`tUp" >> results.csv
    }
    else {
        echo "$name`tDown" >> results.csv
    }

    $count++
    Write-Progress -Activity "Gathering Information" -status "Pinging Hosts..." -percentComplete ($count / $count2 *100)

}

This is the easiest way to me. The output I get is :

Host|State
----------
H1  |Up
H2  |UP
H3  |Down

You can play around with the look, but that's the basic idea. The $count is just a progress bar if you want to spice up the look

  • Hey, stumbled upon your answer and it works great, thank you! Only problem I have is if I use the hostname, it automatically shows it as offline aka "Down". If I use the hostname's IP address, it will show as online aka "Up". Could you possibly assist? Thanks again – Lasagna Cat Mar 23 '17 at 18:47

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