80

Is there a difference between these two lines?

MyName = (s.MyName == null) ? string.Empty : s.MyName

or

MyName = s.MyName ?? string.Empty
  • 3
    They are the same – xspydr Jan 10 '14 at 19:10
  • 8
    Check IL of them, that way you will have a better idea if they will produce the same code or they are being handled differently – manman Jan 10 '14 at 19:16
  • 12
    @manman If someone doesn't understand the high level code what gives you the impression that the IL code will be more readable? – Servy Jan 10 '14 at 19:54
  • 11
    @Servy When some is that curious about learning the difference and everybody else is covering the high level discussions, it's a good idea to point out other ways to understand the difference and if he's very curious, he can go and just compare the result, no need to read the whole IL – manman Jan 10 '14 at 20:12
  • 6
    The only difference is whether you evaluate s.MyName once or twice. – Tim S. Jan 10 '14 at 21:38
166

UPDATE: I wrote a blog post that discusses this topic in more depth. http://www.codeducky.org/properties-fields-and-methods-oh-my/


Generally they will return the same result. However, there are a few cases where you will experience noticeable differences when MyName is a property because the MyName getter will be executed twice in the first example and only once in the second example.

For example, you may experience performance differences from executing MyName twice:

string MyName
{
    get 
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
        return "HELLO";
    }
}

Or you may get different results from executing MyName twice if MyName is stateful:

private bool _MyNameHasBeenRead = false;

string MyName
{
    get 
    {
        if(_MyNameHasBeenRead)
                throw new Exception("Can't read MyName twice");
        _MyNameHasBeenRead = true;
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
        return "HELLO";
    }
}

Or you may get different results from executing MyName twice if MyName can be changed on a different thread:

void ChangeMyNameAsync()
{
    //MyName set to null in another thread which makes it 
    //possible for the first example to return null
    Task.Run(() => this.MyName = null);
}

string MyName { get; set; }  

Here's how the actual code is compiled. First the piece with the ternary expression:

IL_0007:  ldloc.0     // s
IL_0008:  callvirt    s.get_MyName       <-- first call
IL_000D:  brfalse.s   IL_0017
IL_000F:  ldloc.0     // s
IL_0010:  callvirt    s.get_MyName       <-- second call
IL_0015:  br.s        IL_001C
IL_0017:  ldsfld      System.String.Empty
IL_001C:  call        set_MyName

and here is the piece with the null-coalescing operator:

IL_0007:  ldloc.0     // s
IL_0008:  callvirt    s.get_MyName       <-- only call
IL_000D:  dup         
IL_000E:  brtrue.s    IL_0016
IL_0010:  pop         
IL_0011:  ldsfld      System.String.Empty
IL_0016:  call        s.set_MyName

As you can see the compiled code for the ternary operator will make two calls to get the property value, whereas the null-coalescing operator will only do 1.

  • 3
    MyName = s.MyName ?? string.Empty won't execute the getter twice if MyName is a property. So if you don't want to execute the getter twice, then you should use the second line. – Steven Wexler Jan 10 '14 at 20:57
  • 2
    I took the liberty of adding IL examples of the two pieces of code. For a full LINQPad example, look at dropbox.com/s/x6zqdsjlkosxchf/SO21052437.linq – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Jan 10 '14 at 21:49
  • 1
    I think you missed an "s" on the last part of the IL code; currently it reads et_MyName, which should be set_MyName. – AJMansfield Jan 11 '14 at 1:04
  • 2
    Also, the long version with ?: might actually result in null for the above reasons. It might be more illustrative if "Value from other thread" above was actually a null string. Then that would show that the result could be null. Same could happen with the stateful object if the object decided to return a string instance on the first invocation of the get accessoor and return null on the second invocation only. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 11 '14 at 8:01
  • 2
    Also note that the C# 4.0 language specs ensure (in §7.14) that MyValue gets indeed evaluated twice thus preventing the jitter to optimize out that double call (as I thought it would at first) – BlackBear Jan 11 '14 at 12:57
26

If the property is more than a simple getter, you might be executing a function twice in the non-null case for the first one.

If the property is in a stateful object, then the second call to the property might return a different result:

class MyClass
{
    private IEnumerator<string> _next = Next();

    public MyClass()
    {
        this._next.MoveNext();
    }

    public string MyName
    {
        get
        {
            var n = this._next.Current;
            this._next.MoveNext();
            return n;
        }
    }


    public static IEnumerator<string> Next()
    {
        yield return "foo";
        yield return "bar";
    }
}

Also, in the non-string case, the class might overload == to do something different than the ternary operator. I don't believe that the ternary operator can be overloaded.

  • Ternary operator definitely cannot be overloaded. Even C++, which lets you overload practically every other operator, has no way of overloading ?:. I've not seen any language which does. – Darrel Hoffman Jan 12 '14 at 17:52
  • @DarrelHoffman There's always Scala, where you can roll your own ;) – jdphenix Mar 18 '14 at 9:22
9

The only difference is whether you evaluate s.MyName twice or once. The first will do it twice in the case that s.MyName is not null, the second will only ever evaluate it once.

In most cases, this difference doesn't matter, and I'd go with the second because it's more clear and concise.

5

Yes, both are the same, and it is the null-coalescing operator.

It returns the left-hand operand if the operand is not null; otherwise it returns the right hand operand.

If we talk about efficiency then

string MyName = (s.MyName == null) ? string.Empty : s.MyName;
string MyName2 = s.MyName ?? string.Empty;

If I use a dissembler then I can see that the first statement needs 19 statements to be executed by the compiler whereas the second statement required only 12 statements to be executed.

  • Thanks for mentioning the name. I wanted to see if Java also has this ?? operator. And it doesn't, so I'll stick with the ternary operator for both. – developerwjk Jan 10 '14 at 22:36
0

Yes, they do the same. ?? is shorthand for checking for null.

0

They accomplish the same task.

Only difference would be readability as to whether your coworkers or whomever is reading the code understands the syntax.

EDIT: Additionally the first option can evaluate the property MyName twice.

-1

No. Both are doing the same thing. Second one is efficient. Which returns the actual value if it is not null. Else the right-hand side value will be returned.

Refer this http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173224.aspx

Hope this helps.

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