8

This question already has an answer here:

HashMap<String,Integer> map = new HashMap<String,Integer>();
map.put("a", 4);
map.put("c", 6);
map.put("b", 2);

Desired output(HashMap):

c : 6
a : 4
b : 2

I haven't been able to find anything about Descending the order by value.
How can this be achieved? (Extra class not preferred)

marked as duplicate by user180100, kabuko, Hot Licks, matsev, Jonik Jan 10 '14 at 21:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    You can't. But you can sort the Entries (once in a List or other ordered collection) by value: to start, List entries = new ArrayList<Entry<String,Integer>>(hash.getEntries()); then sort that. – user2864740 Jan 10 '14 at 21:09
  • @RC This is not the same question.. – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:13
  • 1
    (While I believe this is a "duplicate", the accepted answer in the other question is quite horrid - read over all the responses. I would also recommend using a [Array]List vs LinkedHashMap as the output collection.) – user2864740 Jan 10 '14 at 21:17
  • 1
    @GameDevGuru: Yes it is, except for trivial differences (map values being Strings instead of Integers). Read especially this answer. You could also have a look at this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/109383/… – Jonik Jan 10 '14 at 21:18
  • I want a million dollars. No, make that 10 million. – Hot Licks Jan 10 '14 at 21:18
22

Try this:

HashMap<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
map.put("a", 4);
map.put("c", 6);
map.put("b", 2);
Object[] a = map.entrySet().toArray();
Arrays.sort(a, new Comparator() {
    public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
        return ((Map.Entry<String, Integer>) o2).getValue()
                   .compareTo(((Map.Entry<String, Integer>) o1).getValue());
    }
});
for (Object e : a) {
    System.out.println(((Map.Entry<String, Integer>) e).getKey() + " : "
            + ((Map.Entry<String, Integer>) e).getValue());
}

output:

c : 6
a : 4
b : 2
  • This puts the key,value pair as a single object in an array, I need to be able to retrieve the key, values seperately after sorting – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:39
  • It puts Map.Entry you can extract key and value from it separately, see upate – Evgeniy Dorofeev Jan 11 '14 at 3:29
4

You can't explicity sort the HashMap, but can sort the entries. Maybe something like this helps:

// not yet sorted
List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>(map.values());

Collections.sort(intList, new Comparator<Integer>() {

    public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
        // for descending order
        return o2 - o1;
    }
});
  • I believe the OP wants to have the key and value together, in however the result is used. – user2864740 Jan 10 '14 at 21:15
  • 1
    This separates the key from value, without the desired result.. – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:16
  • This is true, I figured he was printing them out or something, so all he'd have to do then is make a method that calls map.getKey(value) and returns a string...or whatever he needs. – Joseph Martin Jan 10 '14 at 21:20
1

One of the characteristics of the Hash elements is their particular speed on doing operations like adding, deleting and so on, and this is precisely because they use Hash algorhythms, which means they doesn't keep the order of elements that we know as ascendant or descendant. That means that with the Hash data structures you won't achieve what you want.

  • 2
    It would be a very great suggestion to keep in mind however it does not answer the question. – Ashish Jan 10 '14 at 21:12
  • Instead of saying it's impossible, how about suggesting to cast it as an ArrayList first.. – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:14
  • @user2864740 List<String, Integer> intList = new ArrayList<String,Integer>(map); , and then working with the list. Or something to that effect. – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:18
  • @GameDevGuru But that's not a cast at all! For all casts in Java, where x is a reference type conforming to T: ((T)x) == x is true. – user2864740 Jan 10 '14 at 21:20
  • @user2864740 I have used the wrong terminology, i apologize for the confusion but I think you know what i meant. – GameDevGuru Jan 10 '14 at 21:41

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