7

Given the following array in Shell Programming

foo=(spi spid spider spiderman bar lospia)

I would like to use GREP to search for all words in the array which has the 3 letters spi

Correct output : spi spi spider spiderman lospia

I have tried something like this

foo=(spi spid spider spiderman)

grep "spi" foo

But it seems it is wrong , what is the correct way to go about it ???

2

The following will print out all words that contain spi:

foo=(spi spid spider spiderman bar)
for i in ${foo[*]}
do
    echo $i | grep "spi"
done
18

The simplest solution would be to pipe the array elements into grep:

printf -- '%s\n' "${foo[@]}" | grep spi

A couple of notes:

printf is a bash builtin, and you can look it up with man printf. The -- option tells printf that whatever follows is not a command line option. That guards you from having strings in the foo array being interpreted as such.

The notation of "${foo[@]}" expands all the elements of the array as standalone arguments. Overall the words in the array are put into a multi-line string and are piped into grep, which matches every individual line against spi.

1
  • It may worth to translate it back into an array bar=$(printf -- '%s\n' "${foo[@]}" | grep spi | tr '\n' ' '); – 2i3r Mar 7 '20 at 16:58
2
IFS=$'\n' ; echo "${foo[*]}" | grep spi

This produces the output:

spi
spid
spider
spiderman
lospia
0

If the requirement is to run the script/extract under the exit-on-error shell flag ('-e') and unnecessarily exiting the script/extract whilst also avoiding the tedium of wrapping the code in "set +e" … "set -e", I always use case since unlike grep(1) or test(1), it (case) doesn't update $? …

for e in "${foo[@]}" ; do 
    case "$f" in
        *spi*) echo $f ;;
    esac
done

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