66

Is there any simple/fast way to copy a file in Go?

I couldn't find a fast way in the Doc's and searching the internet doesn't help as well.

64

Warning: This answer is mainly about adding a second link to a file, not about copying the contents.

A robust and efficient copy is conceptually simple, but not simple to implement due to the need to handle a number of edge cases and system limitations that are imposed by the target operating system and it's configuration.

If you simply want to make a duplicate of the existing file you can use os.Link(srcName, dstName). This avoids having to move bytes around in the application and saves disk space. For large files, this is a significant time and space saving.

But various operating systems have different restrictions on how hard links work. Depending on your application and your target system configuration, Link() calls may not work in all cases.

If you want a single generic, robust and efficient copy function, update Copy() to:

  1. Perform checks to ensure that at least some form of copy will succeed (access permissions, directories exist, etc.)
  2. Check to see if both files already exist and are the same using os.SameFile, return success if they are the same
  3. Attempt a Link, return if success
  4. Copy the bytes (all efficient means failed), return result

An optimization would be to copy the bytes in a go routine so the caller doesn't block on the byte copy. Doing so imposes additional complexity on the caller to handle the success/error case properly.

If I wanted both, I would have two different copy functions: CopyFile(src, dst string) (error) for a blocking copy and CopyFileAsync(src, dst string) (chan c, error) which passes a signaling channel back to the caller for the asynchronous case.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

// CopyFile copies a file from src to dst. If src and dst files exist, and are
// the same, then return success. Otherise, attempt to create a hard link
// between the two files. If that fail, copy the file contents from src to dst.
func CopyFile(src, dst string) (err error) {
    sfi, err := os.Stat(src)
    if err != nil {
        return
    }
    if !sfi.Mode().IsRegular() {
        // cannot copy non-regular files (e.g., directories,
        // symlinks, devices, etc.)
        return fmt.Errorf("CopyFile: non-regular source file %s (%q)", sfi.Name(), sfi.Mode().String())
    }
    dfi, err := os.Stat(dst)
    if err != nil {
        if !os.IsNotExist(err) {
            return
        }
    } else {
        if !(dfi.Mode().IsRegular()) {
            return fmt.Errorf("CopyFile: non-regular destination file %s (%q)", dfi.Name(), dfi.Mode().String())
        }
        if os.SameFile(sfi, dfi) {
            return
        }
    }
    if err = os.Link(src, dst); err == nil {
        return
    }
    err = copyFileContents(src, dst)
    return
}

// copyFileContents copies the contents of the file named src to the file named
// by dst. The file will be created if it does not already exist. If the
// destination file exists, all it's contents will be replaced by the contents
// of the source file.
func copyFileContents(src, dst string) (err error) {
    in, err := os.Open(src)
    if err != nil {
        return
    }
    defer in.Close()
    out, err := os.Create(dst)
    if err != nil {
        return
    }
    defer func() {
        cerr := out.Close()
        if err == nil {
            err = cerr
        }
    }()
    if _, err = io.Copy(out, in); err != nil {
        return
    }
    err = out.Sync()
    return
}

func main() {
    fmt.Printf("Copying %s to %s\n", os.Args[1], os.Args[2])
    err := CopyFile(os.Args[1], os.Args[2])
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Printf("CopyFile failed %q\n", err)
    } else {
        fmt.Printf("CopyFile succeeded\n")
    }
}
  • 51
    You should add a big warning that creating a hard link is not the same as creating a copy. With a hard link, you have one file, with a copy you have two different files. Changes to the first file will not affect the second file when using a copy. – topskip Jan 13 '14 at 10:00
  • 1
    Good point. I assumed that was implicit by the definition of a link, but it's really only clear if already known. – markc Jan 16 '14 at 2:03
  • 18
    The question was about copying a file; not creating more partition links to it. A hard link (or soft link) should be an alternative answer if the user simply wants to reference the same file from multiple locations. – Xeoncross May 21 '15 at 18:12
  • Theoretically, you should also check that there is enough space in the dst. – edap Nov 22 '17 at 9:20
44

You've got all the bits you need to write such a function in the standard library. Here's the obvious code to do it.

// Copy the src file to dst. Any existing file will be overwritten and will not
// copy file attributes.
func Copy(src, dst string) error {
    in, err := os.Open(src)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    defer in.Close()

    out, err := os.Create(dst)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    defer out.Close()

    _, err = io.Copy(out, in)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    return out.Close()
}
  • 4
    Depending on your application, you might want to fail if the output file exists, otherwise you will overwrite the contents of the file. You can do that by calling os.OpenFile(dst, syscall.O_CREATE | syscall.O_EXCL, FileMode(0666)) rather than os.Create(...). That call will fail if the destination file already exists. Another optimization would be avoid copying the file if the two files are already the same (e.g. if they were linked). You – markc Jan 11 '14 at 20:06
  • One aspect that can't be accomplished with just the standard library is transparent support for copy-on-write, which may be desirable in some situations. However, c-o-w is only supported on some file systems and there isn't a syscall for it as far as I can tell (apart from ioctl). – kbolino Oct 5 '18 at 22:52
12

If you are running the code in linux/mac, you could just execute the system's cp command.

srcFolder := "copy/from/path"
destFolder := "copy/to/path"
cpCmd := exec.Command("cp", "-rf", srcFolder, destFolder)
err := cpCmd.Run()

It's treating go a bit like a script, but it gets the job done. Also, you need to import "os/exec"

  • 8
    Does this give me guarantees what happens if the srcFolder or destFolder are invalid or even maliciously crafted by the user? Say destFolder := "copy/to/path; rm -rf /", SQL injection style. – user7610 Mar 24 '14 at 8:38
  • 2
    If specifying source folder and destination folder from the user, I recommend a different approach. This code assumes valid paths. – Dandalf Mar 24 '14 at 18:11
  • 3
    @user1047788 While any path from user needs to be scrubbed/validated, just in case you're curious, ";" will not be evaluated by os.Exec as exectuting a new command. Your example would actually send the exact value "copy/to/path; rm -rf /" to the cp command as an argument (spaces and other characters included). – Yobert Nov 2 '14 at 2:21
  • This is a neat trick that works on windows too! However, go on windows will do name sustitution in srcFolder path, go on linux does not. srcFolder := "copy/from/path/*" OK on win, error on Linux. – smile-on May 15 '15 at 13:02
  • @smile-on, how does this work on windows? There is no cp command...? – Xeoncross May 21 '15 at 18:42
9
import (
    "io/ioutil"
    "log"
)

func checkErr(err error) {
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}

func copy(src string, dst string) {
    // Read all content of src to data
    data, err := ioutil.ReadFile(src)
    checkErr(err)
    // Write data to dst
    err = ioutil.WriteFile(dst, data, 0644)
    checkErr(err)
}
  • 1
    Could you add a few lines of explanation or comments to your code, to help the OP understand it. – Morten Jensen Feb 6 '15 at 18:57
  • 3
    In case there is a file of few gigs size in the folder, this program will eat gigs of memory. Use io.CopyN() instead. – smile-on May 15 '15 at 13:08
2

In this case there are a couple of conditions to verify, I prefer non-nested code

func Copy(src, dst string) (int64, error) {
  src_file, err := os.Open(src)
  if err != nil {
    return 0, err
  }
  defer src_file.Close()

  src_file_stat, err := src_file.Stat()
  if err != nil {
    return 0, err
  }

  if !src_file_stat.Mode().IsRegular() {
    return 0, fmt.Errorf("%s is not a regular file", src)
  }

  dst_file, err := os.Create(dst)
  if err != nil {
    return 0, err
  }
  defer dst_file.Close()
  return io.Copy(dst_file, src_file)
}
0

Here is an obvious way to copy a file:

package main
import (
    "os"
    "log"
    "io"
)

func main() {
    sFile, err := os.Open("test.txt")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer sFile.Close()

    eFile, err := os.Create("test_copy.txt")
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    defer eFile.Close()

    _, err = io.Copy(eFile, sFile) // first var shows number of bytes
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }

    err = eFile.Sync()
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
}
  • I tried this method but it resulted in the file not working properly. – snorberhuis Apr 11 '18 at 12:39
  • What does the e in eFile mean? – Roland Illig Apr 29 at 19:18
0

If you are on windows, you can wrap CopyFileW like this:

package utils

import (
    "syscall"
    "unsafe"
)

var (
    modkernel32   = syscall.NewLazyDLL("kernel32.dll")
    procCopyFileW = modkernel32.NewProc("CopyFileW")
)

// CopyFile wraps windows function CopyFileW
func CopyFile(src, dst string, failIfExists bool) error {
    lpExistingFileName, err := syscall.UTF16PtrFromString(src)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    lpNewFileName, err := syscall.UTF16PtrFromString(dst)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    var bFailIfExists uint32
    if failIfExists {
        bFailIfExists = 1
    } else {
        bFailIfExists = 0
    }

    r1, _, err := syscall.Syscall(
        procCopyFileW.Addr(),
        3,
        uintptr(unsafe.Pointer(lpExistingFileName)),
        uintptr(unsafe.Pointer(lpNewFileName)),
        uintptr(bFailIfExists))

    if r1 == 0 {
        return err
    }
    return nil
}

Code is inspired by wrappers in C:\Go\src\syscall\zsyscall_windows.go

0

You can use "exec". exec.Command("cmd","/c","copy","fileToBeCopied destinationDirectory") for windows I have used this and its working fine. You can refer manual for more details on exec.

-6

Have a look at go-shutil.

But be aware, it doesn't copy metadata though. Also need someone to implement things like move.

Might be worth while just using exec.

  • 3
    I had a quick look at the linked package and I would not recommend it. Although it states "We don't expect it to be perfect, just better than whatever your first draft would have been" … they're wrong. They make many basic mistakes, such as ignoring errors, having lots of races (e.g. checking if if a source/destination filename exists separately from later trying to open/create them; don't ever do that!!), etc. – Dave C Aug 10 '15 at 13:59
  • @DaveC Do you have an example for "such as ignoring errors"? I had a quick look at the code, and I couldn't spot any obvious mistake in the error handling part. The code hasn't changed since 2014. – Roland Illig Apr 29 at 19:22
  • 1
    @RolandIllig it was a long time ago so I'm not sure exactly what I was referring to but a 30sec check found an example at github.com/termie/go-shutil/blob/master/shutil.go#L128 ; never ignore errors when closing a file you've been writing to, many times an error during write doesn't show up until the data is flushed during a close. Given the tone of my previous comment I'm guessing there were other things I noticed when I looked at it more seriously in 2015. – Dave C May 2 at 17:02

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